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Realism and the Aim of Science: From the PostScript to the Logic of Scientific Discovery

4.38  ·  Rating Details ·  29 Ratings  ·  3 Reviews
Realism and the Aim of Science is one of the three volumes of Karl Popper s Postscript to the Logic of scientific Discovery. The Postscript is the culmination of Popper s work in the philosophy of physics and a new famous attack on subjectivist approaches to philosophy of science.



Realism and the Aim of Science is the first volume of the Postcript. Popper here formulates an
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Paperback, 464 pages
Published April 10th 1992 by Routledge (first published February 15th 1985)
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Adrienne Stapleton
Jan 15, 2008 Adrienne Stapleton rated it really liked it
Shelves: philosophy, science, own
Karl Popper questions the epistemology of science (including the Scientific Method and the empirical approach) as infallible paths to truth. Popper looks at the problem of hypotheses (the infinite number that can be manufactured at the inception of an investigation and ad hoc AND infallible relationship between open-ended hypothesis/theories with experience).
Justin
Jul 29, 2012 Justin rated it it was amazing
Pretty much has the germ for what pretty much everyone after him pretty much says.
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Sir Karl Raimund Popper was born in Vienna on 28 July 1902. His rise from a modest background as an assistant cabinet maker and school teacher to one of the most influential theorists and leading philosophers was characteristically Austrian. Popper commanded international audiences and conversation with him was an intellectual adventure - even if a little rough -, animated by a myriad of philosoph ...more
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