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What Science Offers the Humanities: Integrating Body and Culture

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3.97  ·  Rating Details ·  32 Ratings  ·  3 Reviews

What Science Offers the Humanities examines some of the deep problems facing current approaches to the study of culture. It focuses especially on the excesses of postmodernism, but also acknowledges serious problems with postmodernism's harshest critics. In short, Edward Slingerland argues that in order for the humanities to progress, its scholars need to take seriously co

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Paperback, 370 pages
Published February 1st 2008 by Cambridge University Press (first published October 1st 2007)
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William1
Dec 08, 2011 William1 marked it as to-read
Shelves: nonfiction, 21-ce, science
This one's a bit of a mindbender for me. Like most readers, I've taken only passing interest over the years in postmodernist theory. No doubt there's some brilliant writing out there engaging that subject. I, however, have never come across it. Theoretical literary texts--how many have I tried to read?--have always left me cold. I read books because of a fascination with the source material, the artist's conception, and whether he or she has brought it off. This is something the postmodernist ...more
Ben
Jul 13, 2010 Ben rated it really liked it
I have mixed feelings about this book. I support the central premise that the humanities can benefit from the sciences, and the author does an excellent job showing the weaknesses of the poles of objectivism and postmodernism by introducing insights and analyses gleaned from cognitive studies. He lost me, however, in the digression into Darwinism and the two "bad boys" of Dawkins and Dennett. Still the conclusion is well earned and I feel many in the humanities could benefit from this ...more
Chris Callaway
Aug 08, 2009 Chris Callaway rated it liked it
A challenging read, but thought-provoking. At the end of the day, though, I'm not sure I accept his argument that we need a substitute for what he calls "objectivism."
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I'm Professor of Asian Studies and Canada Research Chair in Chinese Thought and Embodied Cognition at the University of British Columbia. I work in a lot of academic areas, including early Chinese thought, comparative religion, cognitive science of religion, virtue ethics, cognitive linguistics and science-humanities integration.

My first trade book, Trying Not to Try, is forthcoming from Crown/Ra
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