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Growing Up Weightless

3.65 of 5 stars 3.65  ·  rating details  ·  104 ratings  ·  10 reviews
Talented, imaginative, and self-confident, Matthias Ronay has never known any life but that on the moon, and he clashes with his brilliant politician father, Albin Ronay, in an attempt to change his future. Reprint. NYT.
Paperback, 246 pages
Published July 1st 1994 by Spectra (first published 1993)
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Nicholas Barone
Winner of the 1994 Philip K Dick award, Growing Up Weightless is an impressive coming of age story set on the moon 4 generations after permanent settlements have been established. The story is not action packed, by any means, but it does a wonderful job of sketching out a Lunar civilization that has only recently seceded from earth to form its own nation. The setting is revealed in the background as we follow the story of Matt Ronay - teenage son of one Luna's leaders. Matt and his friends are t...more
SA
This book sticks with you long after you've first read it.

So, this was published in the mid ninties, as I recall, and the descriptions of the tech and structure of the colony don't quite hold up to what we now know about tech. But that doesn't really matter, because what Ford does so expertly is create a culture and society that is at once alien and familiar; his Lunar colony, divorced from Earth, told through the muddy third person omniscient narratives of his male characters, is different and...more
bkwurm
A coming of age tale set in an unspecified time in the future on the moon. Matthias Ronay lives in the lunar city of Copernicus. His father is responsible for the water supply for the lunar population and, at the time of the story, is faced with an aging fleet of ships that bring water back from the asteroids, a diminishing water supply relative to the growing lunar population and faced with a proposal that would ensure near unlimited water for the moon but at the cost of the sacrifice of a huma...more
Nigel
Coming of age on the moon, when the great adventure is over and the accomplishments of the parents completely overshadow the lives of the children. Our hero feels trapped, oppressed and monitored and searches for a chalenge that’ll make his life worthwhile. An effective story from the late, lamented Ford.
Chris
I admire dense, no-word-wasted writing as much as anyone, but maybe Ford could have spent a few extra words on making it slightly clearer what was going on? I don't expect my SF fun reading to be harder going than my academic reading.

LOVED the trains. The trains made it all worthwhile.
Gaines Post
Very inspiring and imaginative. A wonderful coming of age story, too. Six stars our of five.
Rachel
Excellent world-building; terrible pacing. Teenage Matt and his friends live on the moon and have grown up with its culture of resenting earth and being able to jump really high (a more accurate title would have been Growing Up in Low Gravity). It's a slice-of-life sci-fye, but it feels like something big is about to happen, and when nothing does, it's disappointing (I don't mind slice-of-life, just don't pretend to be something else).
John
Jan 01, 2010 John rated it 2 of 5 stars
Shelves: sf
Not too bad, but not my favorite Ford book by any stretch. I really enjoyed the setting and some of the supporting characters, but the main character was a bit of a whiner, and the ending was both completely unsurprising and weirdly rushed. Meh.
Gsmattingly
This book is okay but not great. I don't like that it has no chapters, no divisions of that which was written. Also there is action and not necessarily the best resolution. A number of things were left hanging.
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John Milo "Mike" Ford was a science fiction and fantasy writer, game designer and poet.

Ford was regarded (and obituaries, tributes and memories describe him) as an extraordinarily intelligent, erudite and witty man. He was a popular contributor to several online discussions. He composed poems, often improvised, in both complicated forms and blank verse, notably Shakespearean pastiche; he also wrot...more
More about John M. Ford...
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