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Uncommon Sense: The Heretical Nature of Science

4.03  ·  Rating Details ·  37 Ratings  ·  2 Reviews
Most people believe that science arose as a natural end-product of our innate intelligence and curiosity, as an inevitable stage in human intellectual development. But physicist and educator Alan Cromer disputes this belief. Cromer argues that science is not the natural unfolding of human potential, but the invention of a particular culture, Greece, in a particular histori ...more
Hardcover, 256 pages
Published November 4th 1993 by Oxford University Press, USA (first published January 1st 1993)
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David
Sep 17, 2008 David rated it really liked it
Shelves: science
This is a very interesting, and scary, book. I don't agree entirely with everything in it, but the key arguments make a lot of sense. (Basing a framework on the ideas of a single psychologist is generally a bad idea, but at least he uses Piaget instead of, say, Jung.)

Cromer argues persuasively that science is not a natural outcome of human intelligence. Science, the basis of which is objectivity, is a very unusual thing for humans to stumble upon. While many human inventions occurred independent
...more
Adam Lewis
Feb 19, 2012 Adam Lewis rated it it was amazing
What is science, how did it come about, how is it done, and how should it be taught?

Answering these questions, Alan Cromer has written a book that should certainly be read by every science educator. It should also be read by most people interested in the history and philosophy of science as all of these topics are covered.

Edward O. Wilson, in "On Human Nature" writes that "No intellectual vice is more crippling that defiantly self-indulgent anthropocentrism." It seems Cromer would enthusiastical
...more
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“This seems scientific and disarmingly undogmatic, but it ignores the fact that it is impossible to prove something doesn't exist.” 0 likes
“Scientific journals must remain the preserve of articles capable
of affecting the consensus of the scientific public. Books are the place for opinions, speculations, and fanciful accounts of ricocheting planets.”
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