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March Toward the Thunder
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March Toward the Thunder

3.81 of 5 stars 3.81  ·  rating details  ·  147 ratings  ·  30 reviews
A unique perspective on the Civil War as only Joseph Bruchac could tell it. Louis Nolette is a fifteen-year-old Abenaki Indian from Canada who is recruited to fight in the northern Irish Brigade in the war between the states. Even though he is too young, and not American or Irish, he finds the promise of good wages and the Union?s fight to end slavery persuasive reasons to ...more
Hardcover, 304 pages
Published May 1st 2008 by Dial Books
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Kristin
I will readily admit that The Civil War is not my favorite time period in history. However, after having created a thorough unit on The Holocaust teaching solely through literature, I came to realize how much more interested my students were about learning about historical events. To that end, I am in the process of creating a literature unit for early American History. March Toward The Thunder is a story about The Civil War from a Canadian Indian boy's point of view.


Louis is barely 15, but he l
...more
Adam Berhow
March Toward the Thunder, by Marcus Bruchac is a very good book. It takes place in the civil war times. Louis is an indian boy, about 14 years old who some how in lists into the army. (Apparently he looked old enough to fight). He was doing it for money, and pride. He got caught up in the moment, and couldn't help himself.

I have interests in books where there is action yet there is enough information for the story to make sense. In this book it had just the right mixture in between the two. Th
...more
Ann
BBYA
Bruchac is one of the best in writing native american Indian fiction. During the Civil War the fighting 69th(Irish brigade) were known as fierce fighters but they also lost more men than most. late in the war the military began recruiting anyone so indians young and old were allowed to fight in the white man's war. great detail of the battles.
Dotty
As he lay in the stinking mud of the trench, Louis reloaded. Minie balls were whizzing past them from all sides. This Irish Brigade seemed an odd place for Louis, an Abenaki Indian. But they had one thing in common. Defeat the South and free the slaves. Would they be able to outlast the Rebs?
Bobbyjamla
Technically I didn't even read this. but. what I. did. read was /waaaaaaaaay. boring
Mara
Not Joseph Bruchac's best novel. While he presents stunning historical detail when it comes to battles, dress, and the like, Louis Nolette is simply not that likable of a hero. It didn't take long for him to come across as more than a little whiny. The other soldiers couldn't make the slightest little tease towards him without Louis sticking out his bottom lip and whimpering, It's just because I'm an Indian. Even though the soldiers teased each other as unmercifully as they did Louis, and they w ...more
Ste Ven
So far this book as been tough to read. I find no reason to continue on with this. It hasn't made a impact to me yet. Let's hope the story gets better.

The book had no further interesting plot developments. I guess it was just kind of hard to understand the text, as it skips ideas and organizes chapters from specific dates. The story is about a indian- canadian teen called Louis. When he was a few years younger, he loses his dad in a drowning accident. He had gone off the another town for a battl
...more
Ellen
War stories are not my first choice when looking for a genre, but I picked this one up with a particular student in mind who truly enjoys them. That being said, I found March Toward the Thunder to be a very good book. As I have said in other reviews, the power of a true story well told is captivating, and this was no exception. The author bases this story on the life of his own ancestor, a young Native from Canada who joined up in the Civil War mostly for the promised money that would go to give ...more
Christopher Clark
Louis Nolette is a young Abenaki Indian living during the Civil War. When he meets a white recruiter who convinces him to sign up for the Union Army, he convinces himself that he is doing it for the money. He is drawn into a regiment of Irish nationals fighting for the Union Army, and after a few weeks training, they are sent into battle. The fighting changes him. He watches friends die and courageous acts as a southern general breaches their lines, is shot and valiantly retrieved by his men. Th ...more
English Education
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Ricki
Joe Bruchac always shows care and accuracy in his incorporation of historical data in his narrative tales. Louis is a 15-year-old Native American boy from Canada who wants to be a part of something great. He joins the Civil War Union and lies about his age. While he encounters a lot of prejudice, his comrades develop a deep respect and admiration toward him.

While I think some readers may be turned off by the battle names and statistics, I appreciated learning about this time in our history. I a
...more
Me
I thought that this was an okay book. I don't have much to say. It went at a decent pace and turned out fine.I got boring at parts when i thought they could have possibly spiced it up a bit. But other than that the book was what i expected.
Jack
This book was... Interesting, I guess you could say. I'm not a big reader of Civil War books, but I gave this one a try. I'm conflicted about it though.
For one thing, it's definitely well written, and told from an unusual perspective. However, the book seemed repetitive. The main character's story went something like this: Fight, miraculously survive, hang out at the base while ignoring the constant danger, repeat. As a result, it wasn't very exciting or grabbing. Even so, I think the writing c
...more
Kacy Harsha
Great view of civil war and addresses prejudice as well.
Margaret
Abenaki Indian in the civil war. For folks who know the civil war, battle by battle, it's even better because (I'm told by my reading buddy) there's lots of good historical detail. What I loved is a 15 year old's vision of war, race, the cameraderie he feels with the men in his Irish unit, but the easier bond he feels with the other Indian he meets (Mohawk), and with his family back home...
Tommy C.
This book was about Louis, a 15 year old indian who wants to make a difference in the fight against slavery. He joined up with the 69th Irish Brigade and marched for virginia. After 3 months of fighting he had made many friends and lost many more. During those months you were told of the pain and hardship of being a soldier at that time.
Brent Tompkins
Personally this is one of the greatest books I have ever read! It is fiction and I do not useually read fiction, but this is historical fiction and it adds enough realism to give it a compelling storyline. In addition the characters are one of the many highlights in ths amazing story.I give it five out of five and I deffinitly recomend it.
Anthony Gonzales
When I first started reading this book I thought it was going to be a boring old informational book but as soon as I started reading I couldent put it down. I wanted to read a bigger book and this was one that I could read. It was longer pages and more descriptive than any other book I have ever read.
Alice
I really enjoyed this; it doesn’t attempt to sugarcoat or glorify war, or diminish the prejudices that our main character faces. It focuses on the relationships that form under fire, and does an excellent job. But why does every war book have to have a girl disguised as a boy?
Fred V Provoncha
I don't read civil war books, and this book sat unread on my shelf for over a year. I picked it up a few days ago, and now I can't put it down. I love this book, I love the way the author helps me to care for these people, it's a simple but compelling style. It suits me.
Kathy
Historical fiction with an Indian tribe that is not often written about, the Abenaki. Combined with New York state's Irish brigade during the Civil War makes a good read.
Tori
I liked the perspective of this book... the civil war from the point of view of a Native American soldier. The writing didn't draw me in immediately, but I did enjoy the story.
Derek Ni
This was an amazing book. It shows what life as a soldier in the civil war might've been like, and describes the bravery of the men who fought in the war.
Michelle
Very good historical fiction about Civil War; really descriptive and interesting!
Angie
excellent guy book! good action, history, blood, cannons, rifles, amputations.
John Pae
A really good read. I recommend it to anyone who likes the civil war
Trisha Owens
Compelling story of native son who enlists in the Civil War.
Kari
Civil War, Irish Brigade, Abanaki's, male relationships.
Ai
This is a very interesting historical fiction book...
Tristynn
Nov 23, 2009 Tristynn is currently reading it
lots of things about the civil war
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15337
Joseph Bruchac lives with his wife, Carol, in the Adirondack mountain foothills town of Greenfield Center, New York, in the same house where his maternal grandparents raised him. Much of his writing draws on that land and his Abenaki ancestry. Although his American Indian heritage is only one part of an ethnic background that includes Slovak and English blood, those Native roots are the ones by wh ...more
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