Beruang Dan Naga (John Clark, #3)
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Beruang Dan Naga (John Clark #3)

3.71 of 5 stars 3.71  ·  rating details  ·  14,032 ratings  ·  268 reviews
Sebuah Mercedes S-Class hancur berkeping-keping di Moskow, Rusia. Ladang harta karun luar biasa telah ditemukan di sebelah timur Siberia. Negara tetangga yang besar mengincar temuan kekayaan yang tak ternilai tersebut.

Presiden John Patrick Ryan bertanya-tanya apakah ini pertanda akan terjadi sesuatu yang jauh lebih berbahaya. Namun sementara para penyelidik bekerja di Mosk...more
Paperback, 1008 pages
Published 2006 by Gramedia (first published January 1st 1999)
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Jonathan
“The Bear and the Dragon” is 1137 pages long. It could have been less than 600 if Clancy had left out the political propaganda.

The book’s focus is anti-China rhetoric. President Jack Ryan’s trusted SecTreas calls them “little slant-eyed fucks” and “Chink bastards”. SecState uses “our little yellow brothers” followed by “conscienceless motherfuckers” (“motherfuckers”, “cocksuckers”, and “barbarians” are primary descriptors of the Chinese). A Treasury hero calls them “little chinks”, “backwards c...more
Hoai
This is one of the worst book I have ever read. what a waste of time. I lost alot of respect for Tom Clancy after this book.
George
Ok, so I've read probably half a dozen Clancy novels over the course of time, most recently this and Executive Orders.

What's interesting is that today, in 2013, how wrong Clancy has been about practically everything, from both foreign and domestic policy. Clancy has made a career of using an encyclopedic knowledge of weapons systems to create spy and military dramas, with no small amount of flag-waving.

But eventually, it grows tiresome. In the case of The Bear and the Dragon, it becomes flat out...more
Mike
This is something of a mash of previous Clancy plots with 600 extra pages thrown in for good measure. China, who is facing a major economic problem ( Red Storm Rising ), decides to start a war with Russia. The Chinese are lead by a cadre of arrogant, out of touch oligarchs ( Debt of Honor ) who are unable to see that they are in over their heads. This culminates in the US coming to Russia's aid, where they wreck all comers (Just about every Clancy book ever), and the Chinese attempting to nuke a U...more
Claire
I wanted to die while reading this book. It is awful. Clancy picks about seven key phrases - "six five and pick 'em", "the Navy makes great coffee", for example - and repeats them every two pages and then calls it writing. Oh, and he repeatedly calls Chinese people "Klingons". I'm not joking.
Exoticbrett
There is no way this book should be 1137 pages. It is seriously too long. Most of Tom Clancy's books are oversized, but generally they remain entertaining and the prose is for the most part worthy of being kept in for the final printing, but this is the first time in a TC novel where I've felt major pain in getting to the end. This book needed an editor.
I believe the Clancy universe jumped the shark with the previous book, Rainbow Six. The plot for the Bear and the Dragon seems to involve much r...more
J.D. Swinn
THis is the book that made me quit Clancy's Ryan series.

**Spoiler alert***

Well, I kind of wish I could spoil this, but it was all so cliche and predictable.

It seems Clancy has found his Novel script, and the only thing that differs is the name of the good and bad guys.

In this one, Russia is the good guy that is being attacked by the bad guy China. RUssian characters are oh-so-noble and the Chinese evil or bland (they're gonna die anyway, so why bother making them human)

It's all just too obviou...more
Bill
OK...so I like Tom Clancy's "Jack Ryan" books. Guilty pleasure I suppose. By this point the Jack Ryan Universe is so far removed from the real world that it may as well be science fiction. Still, the books ARE page-turners, and they make great "vacation/at the beach" books. When you devour books the way I do (usually a couple hundred pages at a sitting), a 600-900 page book that holds your interest is a fun read! Still, this series is getting a little TOO formulaic and this one (more than the re...more
Nikki Golden
Here's another complaint about Tom Clancy books--yeah, still not sure why I end up reading them--it takes him 400 pages to get to a plot. For 400 pages, he's meandering among too many potential plot lines, and really, it's a lot of work to keep track of them all. But hey, he still sells books, and I still keep reading them, so that's my fault.

This one--which is hopefully the last of this ridiculously long series--was WAY too heavy on the anti-abortion stance. I think that we could have done away...more
Greg
This will be the last Clancy book I read. His writing has gotten sloppy, and his personal politics have taken over his story lines. I'd like to think he was a better writer than this back in his "Hunt for Red October" and "Cardinal of the Kremlin" days - and that my love for his writing wasn't purely a lack of maturity on my part.

Bear & Dragon has all of the granular over-detailed descriptions of every little working part of every military piece of hardware one would expect, with a completel...more
Evan
Definately not my favorite Tom Clancy novel. It took a while for the plot to unravel, and even then it was a little bit of a stretch. Took too long to get the real battle, and once there it was over too quickly and too hokey. Clancy is usually rock-solid on this stuff, but missed the mark on this one. Not horrible by any means - still finished it, at least - but definately a couple notches below what i would expect from Tom.
Kelli
I didn't get very far in this book. I read just a couple chapters- enough to see that swearing was going to be commonplace.
I stopped reading because of that. If I want to hear the F-word, I can just come to school and not tell the kids to knock it off... Too bad- the story was very promising. I was excited for the exciting read.
Kyler
Tom Clancy’s The Bear and The Dragon was an amazing read. This book is for anyone who wants to read and has the time to take in a thousand page book. It doesn’t fell like a thousand pages once you start the book flies by with relative ease. The book starts off with a Russian head of state being caught up in an attempted murder and narrowly escaping with his life. The first few pages set the tone for the whole book. This book starts off explosive and continues to keep a fast pace and action throu...more
Bradley Woods
Fictional conflict between Russia and the People's Republic of China. President Ryan, upon finding intel that the Chinese were planning a hasty invasion of far eastern Siberia, asks NATO to allow Russian entry, so Russia, fragmented after the collapse of the USSR would be under NATO protection. NATO agree's and Russia is allowed entry. The PLA skeptical about the NATO-Russian alliance goes ahead with preset invasion plans. The NATO response is a destroyed PLA Navy by US carrier fighters, the des...more
Brian
This was my first Tom Clancy novel. It was a fascinating genre leap for me. I do love international politics, but I've only ever encountered them in a present tense sense, i.e. reading the news. It was intriguing to try and put myself into the perspective of the story, being about modern times but written a decade ago in a parallel universe where some events from the past are the same as ours and some are different. It's entirely believable. I thought it was funny that China was the country that...more
Lu
The first 300 pages were tough to get through, but, finally, Clancy got the hook in. The last 600 pages had my interest reading about the turmoil a president must go through daily, the cultural differences between countries which affects their political decisions,i.e. China, Russia, and the Unites States, and the military technology that can almost read minds.
Joni Parker
I guess I missed the book where Jack Ryan became President of the United States. It seems to be a strange career step for a CIA analyst. While I liked the intrigue overall in this book, I found a few flaws which was quite unusual for a Clancy book. Russia was brought into NATO on the decision of the President and virtually overnight. This process would have taken months if not years to get done, if at all. Also, there was no presence of U.S. forces in the area, but suddenly there were. Once agai...more
pomponette
not really my taste, but i just want to try politics, CIA, NSA and government stuff once...got a difficult time to get used to the details and espionage vocabs, but finally enjoying it... hopefully cud finish this as its my first try having several heavy reading materials at a time :P
Mel
Well, it's apparent the Muses that served Clancy so well for his first few books have all but abandoned him. Starting with Executive Orders he departs from his military/political/spy genres into the social pontificating arena. With The Bear and the Dragon he's really on his high horse regarding social issues - about which I'd have to say he's either lacking in information from the 21st century or he's choosing to ignore it. His repeated comments about shopping being imbedded in women's genes is...more
Jon
This is easily the worst Clancy book I've read. The only way this gets two stars is that—like all Clancy books—it's a thrilling ride. I could handle the political propaganda, because books aren't written in an ideological vacuum. And Clancy isn't writing in a real world, either. It's a world where the president gets to unilaterally go to war whenever he wants and one where countries are clearly divided into good and evil. It's an uncomplicated world that's fun for novels and completely irrelevan...more
Josh Glover
As usual with Tom Clancy, a great story with lots of technical detail on the military and intelligence communities. Zhang, the Chinese minister without portfolio, is a great character. I love the portrayal of post-Soviet Russia as it should have been, and it breaks my heart when I think of the current state of Russian politics.

What I could do with less of, as with all of Clancy's Jack Ryan as president books, is Clancy's opinions on US domestic politics. I really like Tom Clancy, and can respect...more
Mike
If you like unsuspenseful thrillers, dimensionless characters, and Neocon philosophizing, this book is for you.
Kingston
This was a great book, but the actual war part of it was too short for my tastes.
Joe
When I read my first Tom Clancy book years ago (perhaps Red Storm Rising or something like that) I really enjoyed it.

I noticed that his writing expresses a consistent Republican-oriented point of view that I find obnoxious - so much so that I lose sight of the story line while I'm irritated that yet another character has made some feeble comment about the "left-wing."

I can't say for certain which has changed - Tom Clancy's writing has shifted to the right or my own outlook has shifted to the le...more
Florian
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Steve
Listened to an audiobook of this while traveling the desolation of West Texas. Just as hunger can make many foods more appealing, West Texas can make many audiobooks tolerable. Mr. Clancy, like many bestselling authors who crank out material like TV cranks out reality shows, doesn't improve with practice. The author seems to have lost himself in his own limited world of his own creation, where every individual is either superhuman or super-incompetent and where reality isn't relevant. The plot o...more
Jedrek Kostecki
Clany's lost it. He had it before, Red October and Red Storm Rising were fun, readable books. In contrast, this one is a disaster.

The book could easily be half the length if Clancy had decided to do two things:

* Stop repeating everything. Most memorable things people say are repeated at least two or three times, many are drilled by repetition to the point of making you want to cut somebody. Generals/leaders not happy having to kill other people, but still doing it because it's their job? Seven o...more
Jerome
Clancy's newest Ryan opus is somewhat of a disappointment in comparison to his past stories. For the record, I am a rabid Clancy fan and always grab his newest book on the first day. I have enjoyed every novel he has written, and still consider him to be my favorite author.

This time around however, I'm not satisfied with the novel as a whole. Maybe the quality of his past works has set the bar too high for me to enjoy any subsequent attempts. In any case, here's my take on this book:

1)Roll Call:...more
Becky
The Bear and The Dragon is Tom Clancy's last great work of fiction. After the disappointment of Rainbow Six, he once again hit his stride as the world's foremost military-thriller writer. His target of choice this time? Red China.

The world balance of power has shattered. The once-feared USSR is no more. In its wake is left a disoriented Russia. It is a country rife with crime. It is a country stricken with poverty. It is a country sitting atop a literal goldmine of natural resources. These are r...more
Margaret Small
I've finally finished all 1137 pages. This is a ....blokey book. President Jack Ryan (acronym POTUS, alias SWORDSMAN), reluctant president, in every scene moans about how he hates the job, can't do it, wishes he wasn't president, and will everyone please call him Jack, not Mr. president? Except of course his devoted secretary who sneaks him cigarettes (forbidden by his wife, FLOUTS/SURGEON) but is never chided when she uses his title. FLOTUS plays a cameo role, because she's way too busy being a...more
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Tom Clancy was an English major at Baltimore’s Loyola College. As a Maryland insurance broker with a passion for naval history, his dream of writing a novel came true with his first effort, The Hunt for Red October (1984).

He since wrote more than a dozen novels, which have a blend of realism and authenticity, intricate plotting, and razor-sharp suspense. Ten of the novels, including The Teeth of...more
More about Tom Clancy...
The Hunt for Red October (Jack Ryan, #3) Patriot Games (Jack Ryan, #1) Clear and Present Danger (Jack Ryan, #5) Red Storm Rising Without Remorse (John Clark, #1)

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