Daughter of the Forest  (The Sevenwaters Trilogy, #1)
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating

Daughter of the Forest (Sevenwaters #1)

by
4.28 of 5 stars 4.28  ·  rating details  ·  27,855 ratings  ·  2,162 reviews
Juliet Marillier is a rare talent, a writer who can imbue her characters and her story with such warmth, such heart, that no reader can come away from her work untouched. Daughter of the Forest is a testimony to that talent, a first novel and the beginning of a trilogy like no other: a mixture of history and fantasy, myth and magic, legend and love that only Juliet Marilli...more
Turtleback, 411 pages
Published April 28th 2002 by Turtleback Books (first published April 1st 1999)
more details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.
This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 3,000)
filter  |  sort: default (?)  |  rating details
Kat Kennedy
***Warning**** Mention of rape and discussion of such follows.

I gave this book four stars so obviously I did enjoy it. There are actually many, many enjoyable elements to this book and I promise to get to them in a moment...

I had rather sad conversation with a very good friend of mine a while back. She had the rather unfortunate (formal word that neglects so much) experience of being brutally raped twice in different situations by different people. She then swore off sex and love and life. So a...more
Tatiana
May 28, 2010 Tatiana rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: all fantasy/fairy tale retellings fans
Recommended to Tatiana by: Harper Bell
4.7 stars

Aside from a couple of minor qualms, Daughter of the Forest is pretty much an example of an almost perfect debut novel.

This book is a beautiful retelling of the Celtic "Swans" myth, which has been familiar to me since childhood through the Hans Christian Andersen's version - The Wild Swans. Sorcha is the seventh child and the only daughter of Lord Colum of Sevenwaters. When Colum remarries after being widowed for almost 13 years, the evil stepmother (and witch) puts a dreadful spell on...more
 Danielle The Book Huntress (Angels Weep For Goodreads)
I have always loved the fairy tale about the sister with numerous brothers who had a wicked stepmother who enchanted her brothers to turn them into birds. The number of brothers and the type of birds can vary. I have seen it with ravens and with swans. In Daughter of the Forest, Ms. Marillier used the version in which the heroine has six brothers and they are all turned into swans. I must say I truly enjoyed (and devoured) this heartbreaking, emotionally wrenching novel based on that fairy tale....more
Keertana
Incredible. I know I've said I've been speechless when reading books before, but this time, I genuinely don't have the words to express what a masterpiece this novel is. I actually finished this novel early today morning, at around 1:30, but it was only at 2:30-ish that I actually got up to go to sleep. I couldn't get this story out of my head; I simply kept thinking about it. If Juliet Marillier hadn't already made a fan out of me with Heart's Blood, then I'd be tripping over myself to fall at...more
AH
What a breathtakingly beautiful book!

It’s hard to describe Daughter of the Forest. It is a fantasy, a historical, and a romance. It reads like a fable or a fairy tale. It has all the elements of a fairy tale – the evil stepmother, a fairy godmother (sort of), an enchantment, an impossible task to accomplish, a prince charming, and a happily ever after.

This has to be my all time favorite book now. I was captivated by the story, mesmerized by the voice of Sorcha, our heroine. I did not put this b...more
Vinaya
How do you know when a book is a great book?
- When the line between reality and fiction begins to blur, so that you could be sitting on a sunny balcony off a busy street, and still feel like you are in the cool, dark confines of the ancient Irish forests. When you are struck with sympathetic muteness because talking means the difference between life and death for the heroine, and it takes an actual, conscious effort to unlock your throat and answer when someone calls out to you. When you sudden...more
Meridyforgot
Jul 29, 2009 Meridyforgot rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: adults
I just want to say that I have very mixed feelings about this book. It is one of my favorite love stories of all time. It is not some mere trite story. It is meaningful and deep.

However be warned, it does have what I have referred to before as "content". There is a part near the beginning where she is abused. Skip it. There is a part at the very end after they are married. There you go. So if you read it, and want to come away unscathed, be careful. Start at the part where Red finds her(maybe s...more
Adrienne
Such a gem to read and have on your bookshelf, full of magic and mysticism, love and romance. One the most beautifully crafted books I've read in a long time, the story line is very simple and has been written about in other reviews ,what makes it extra special is the voice of the narrator Sorcha (sor-ca), she tells her story with such a simple yet very emotive voice that can bring the reader to tears in just a few beautifully put together words. Altho this is a hefty book it didn't seem to matt...more
Rane
May 28, 2009 Rane rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to Rane by: new_user
It's been such a long time since one book has made me feel one strong emotion from another. From tears to rage
This book will make you feel something wether you like it or not

This was an beauitful book with sometimes some harsh underlining factors that made me cringe and at one time wanna rip out the pages, but as I read I couldn't help by be drawn even more deeply into the story.

I won't lie and say I wasn't PO'd at the abuse Sorcha suffered but your showed she was stronger and was able to b...more
Emily
Aug 03, 2008 Emily rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: fantasy lovers, fans of Robin McKinley, people who love folktales and Celtic folklore
Recommended to Emily by: I saw it on the shelf at my brother and sister-in-law's appartme
If you are looking for a review that is more about the plot and characters, you'll have to look elsewhere. However, these are my thoughts on my experience of reading this book:

This is now one of my favorite books. It was amazing. There are several reasons I loved this book but there is one that explains all the others - somehow I really identified with the protagonists even though on the surface I am nothing like her. However, I must have found something in her to identify with because I actuall...more
Angela
I would not recommend it, especially to young adults. The story was beautifully woven and the writing is very engrossing, but there is graphic description of abuse that did not strengthen the book and was very unnecessary. It pretty much ruined the book for me.
Ridley
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Kathleen
3.5 stars. Wondrously evocative and lyrical. Enthralling. Suspenseful. Redundant. Too redundant.

This is a popular romantic fairy tale for YAs (yet I question that classification, as explained below).

Summary, with big spoilers hidden and italicized comments:

Daughter of the Forest is an über-extended take on The Six Swans, set in medieval Ireland, when Druidic and Christian cultures first started to overlap.

Sorcha of Sevenwaters is about 16 years old when the story ENDS. She is deeply attached...more
Angie
The time has come. I knew that at some point I would have to review Daughter of the Forest. Do you ever go through your book reviews and realize you haven't reviewed one of your favorite books of all time? And the reason is simply that you read it before reviewing was even a twinkle in your eye. You may have talked about it here, there, and everywhere. You may have heckled dear friends shamelessly until they broke down and read it. But you haven't actually reviewed it. And the other day I realiz...more
Isamlq
Photobucket
I went from
Photobucket
to this,
Photobucket
to this,
Photobucket
to this,
Photobucket

There are books that you take little sips from then are those you devour… this a little bit of both. It’s intricately told with a cast of characters each as nuanced as the other that I couldn’t help but get drawn in. That it’s lengthy is of no issue, in fact, I loved that aspect of it. Particularly since it allowed the reveal of who was close to whom and which sibling had what role. But this is mainly about Sorcha though, youngest of the seven among whom...more
Misty
What can I say, I saved the best for last. Daughter of the Forest is my favorite fairy tale retelling of all time. (So far. Let me know your faves and try to prove me wrong!) I did a mini-review of this once before, but I want to expand on that now, and get a little gushy fangirly.

I read this for the first time after having just finished Wildwood Dancing (also by Marillier). It came highly recommended by a friend, so I was pretty gung-ho. But the first 30 pages almost made me put it down. It's n...more
Catie
I am a huge fan of fairy tales; however, I think that the ones I am drawn to the most tend to fit into two categories. I love the dark, realistic retellings with grey characters that are both villains and heroes and endings where nothing is truly resolved. I also love the black and white versions with clear cut uber villains and endings chock full o’ sweet sweet comeuppance. This book is somewhere in-between those two extremes. Although I really liked it, I found myself alternately wishing for m...more
Allison (The Allure of Books)
Daughter of the Forest by Juliet Marillier tells the story of Sorcha and her six older brothers. See, Sorcha should have been the seventh son of a seventh son – but she ended up being a girl instead. Fate is funny that way (turns out not so much ha-ha funny as cruelly ironic). What follows is the story of how Sorcha will do almost anything to keep her family together.

To say that Juliet Marillier starts off Daughter of the Forest a little slow is like saying it might get slightly boring to watch...more
Emily May
Jun 17, 2012 Emily May marked it as dnf  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fairy-tales

No Rating

I cannot fairly rate this book so I'm going to leave it as it is. I was originally attracted by the high ratings and positive reviews but I discovered early on that, for whatever reason, this book simply isn't for me. I couldn't appreciate the story enough to read on and that is why I won't insult it by giving the kind of low rating I usually give to abandoned books. In this instance, it was definitely me and not the story or writing.
Elise
Five stars doesn't seem to be enough. In fact, I want to go back and give all of my five star books four stars because they just can't compare. These characters will be in my heart forever, and this book has forever changed what books I choose to read.

My only regret is that I chose this book when I had to actually DO things, like work and SLEEP.
Carmo Santos
A Filha da Floresta foi, sem dúvida nenhuma,um dos livros de fantasia mais bonitos que li. Não vou comparar com O Senhor dos Anéis, porque são obras muito diferentes(foi só um aparte para quem conhece a minha devoção à Terra Média e a minha opinião de que não há melhor fantasia que a de Tolkien).
Adiante.
Esta fantasia, é uma fantasia mais suave; apesar da magia e feitiçaria sempre presente, a autora focou-se mais na humanidade das personagens, nos seus sentimentos e no que as move e as conduz ao...more
Sandra
Beautifully readable, well drawn characters, well woven plot. Loosely based on the old tale of the six brothers turned into swans by their evil step mother, Marillier enriches the tale with a likable heroine and six well defined brothers as well as other interesting people along the way.

Lyrical descriptions of the enchanted forest with its magical creatures enrich the tale, beautifully woven to draw us in and surround us with this world.

Straight forward without layers and hidden meanings, it is...more
Brigid *Flying Kick-a-pow!*
Okay, it's been like a week since I finished this, so I suppose I should probably review it now. This review probably won't be too long, since I don't have much to criticize.

Well, this is the second book by Juliet Marillier that I've read. The first was Wildwood Dancing, which I really enjoyed. However, I was hesitant to try this series because it sounded a little too "epic fantasy" for my taste. Usually I don't really enjoy this type of thing, but I thoroughly enjoyed this book.

It had very good...more
Terry (Ter05 TwiMoms/ MundieMoms)
I first read this incredible book in March of 2010. Before I had finished it I had ordered all the books in the Sevenwaters series. Before I finished the series I had purchased every book Juliet Marillier had written. She is a storyteller like no other.

A friend of mine is reading Daughter of the Forest now, so I decided it was time to re-read it. I can not tell how much I enjoyed this re-read, and I felt I had to re-write my review. Daughter of the Forest takes place in about the 5th century in...more
Nancy
This book is absolutely the gold standard in fairy tale reimaginings/retellings. It's based on "The Six Swans," which is anyway one of my favorite tales, for its psychological complexity, suffering, and mysterious, almost baffling love story. Marillier's version captured me from the first page. It's detailed and passionate and emotionally convincing, and the writing is gorgeous without being overblown. I loved the world Marrillier creates. And what a heroine is Sorcha; what a hero is Red; and GO...more
Peep (Pop! Pop!)
I judge books by their cover, I admit it, so in all honesty I would have never picked up this book on it's own. It looks too science fictiony/fantasy for me, and I can never get into those books. Also, the way the girl is on the cover kinda reminded me of Archangel (Samaria, #1) by Sharon Shinn (which I still need to finish - I will Chachic!). At any rate, I saw that most of my Goodreads friends had read it and they all seemed to enjoy it... which is surprising because usually we're all across the board.

Atnywho, I picked it up and s...more
Heidi
I think it goes without saying that I read a lot of books. I like pretty much everything (because if I don’t like it, I usually abandon it), love a good deal, but every so often a book comes along that hits me in a way I know I will remember forever.

It’s taken me nearly two months to compose my thoughts on Juliet Marillier’s Daughter of the Forest. Usually, this is a length of time in which I will give up reviewing a book altogether, it wasn’t meant to be, and that’s fine. But I can’t do that wi...more
Allison
Daughter of the Forest is an absorbing, heart-breaking story. It's a retelling of the classic fairytale of the Wild Swans, and it doesn't gloss over the darker implications. Wallowing in the misery of them is more like it.

In Ireland in the time of the Druids, Sorcha is a healer and a true child of the forest. Each of her six brothers is distinctly drawn, and the bonds of love and loyalty between them are firmly established - tangible, almost. As everything falls apart, their closeness makes the...more
Pauline
"Daughter of the Forest" by Juliet Marillier is based on "The Six Swans" a German fairy tale collected by the Brothers Grimm.

This fantasy is the story of Sorcha; she is the sister to six brothers who are turned into swans by their malevolent stepmother. The brothers can take on their human form at the seasonal equinoxes. Sorcha is left with the task to liberate her brothers from the curse by never uttering a sound and by weaving six shirts made from starwort. Construction of the shirts is a horr...more
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 99 100 next »
  • Summers at Castle Auburn
  • Kushiel's Avatar (Phèdre's Trilogy #3)
  • Deerskin
  • The Bone Doll's Twin (The Tamír Triad, #1)
  • A Senhora da Magia (As Brumas de Avalon, #1)
  • The White Mare (Dalriada Trilogy, #1)
  • Heir to the Shadows (The Black Jewels, #2)
  • Queen of Song and Souls (Tairen Soul, #4)
  • Lord of the Shadows (Second Sons Trilogy, #3)
  • Crown Duel (Crown & Court #1-2)
  • Warprize  (Chronicles of the Warlands, #1)
  • Princess of the Sword (Nine Kingdoms, #3)
  • A Última Feiticeira (A Saga das Pedras Mágicas, #1)
  • The Fairy Godmother (Five Hundred Kingdoms, #1)
8649
Juliet Marillier was born July 27, 1948 in Dunedin, New Zealand and grew up surrounded by Celtic music and stories. Her own Celtic-Gaelic roots inspired her to write her first series, the Sevenwaters Trilogy. Juliet was educated at the University of Otago, where she majored in music and languages, graduating BA and a B Mus (Hons). Her lifelong interest in history, folklore and mythology has had a...more
More about Juliet Marillier...
Son of the Shadows (Sevenwaters, #2) Wildwood Dancing (Wildwood, #1) Child of the Prophecy (Sevenwaters, #3) Heir to Sevenwaters (Sevenwaters, #4) Cybele's Secret (Wildwood, #2)

Share This Book

“He would have told her - he would have said, it matters not if you are here or there, for I see you before me every moment. I see you in the light of the water, in the swaying of the young trees in the spring wind. I see you in the shadows of the great oaks, I hear your voice in the cry of the owl at night. You are the blood in my veins, and the beating of my heart. You are my first waking thought, and my last sigh before sleeping. You are - you are bone of my bone, and breath of my breath.” 408 likes
“Perhaps this is what the stories meant when they called somebody heartsick. Your heart and your stomach and your whole insides felt hollow and empty and aching.” 215 likes
More quotes…