Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “Growing Up in the 1850s: The Journal of Agnes Lee” as Want to Read:
Growing Up in the 1850s: The Journal of Agnes Lee
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

Growing Up in the 1850s: The Journal of Agnes Lee

3.48  ·  Rating Details ·  58 Ratings  ·  8 Reviews
Eleanor Agnes Lee, Robert E. Lee's fifth child, began her journal in December 1852 at the early age of twelve. An articulate young woman, her stated ambitions were modest: "The everyday life of a little school girl of twelve years is not startling," she observed in April 1853; but in fact, her five-year record of a southern girl's life is lively, unpredictable, and full of ...more
Paperback, 171 pages
Published September 1st 1988 by University of North Carolina Press (first published January 1st 1984)
More Details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about Growing Up in the 1850s, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about Growing Up in the 1850s

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 128)
filter  |  sort: default (?)  |  Rating Details
Delene H. Allen
Oct 09, 2013 Delene H. Allen rated it really liked it
Shelves: historical
I normally do not care for diaries, but this one appeals to me as it was written by a child in the 1850s.
Miss Agnes Lee was the fifth child of Robert E. Lee, and this book, edited by Mary Custis Lee deButts, is a diary covering five years in her life during the 1850s. Agnes began writing her journal in 1852 at age 12. She did not write every day, but rather when she felt like something was important. I felt her heartbreak as she described leaving her childhood home in Arlington VA as Robert E
...more
Julie
Nov 03, 2012 Julie rated it really liked it
I wish I would have read this book BEFORE seeing Arlington, I think I would have looked at the house and the outbuildings differently. A pre-civil war diary by the fifth child of Robert E Lee. Written by Agnes between her twelfth and sixteenth years, it's an innocent portrayal of life of the wealthy during that era. At the end of the book, there are letters between Agnes and her father. A very worthwhile read.
Mallory McClenathen
Jul 31, 2016 Mallory McClenathen rated it really liked it
Through her thoughtful and articulate journal entries, Agnes Lee, the fifth child of Robert E. Lee, provides the reader with wonderful insight into antebellum life in the 1850s, as well as what it was like growing up in the Lee family.

Some examples of 1850s life that she details are: her education, both at home and then at an all-girls boarding school; life at West Point and activities of the officers there; her father's duties in the army and where he was stationed; the importance of church and
...more
Kellymark44
May 07, 2015 Kellymark44 rated it it was ok
This is a journal written by a girl that lived in Arlington house in DC. I enjoyed the view into the history of daily life from the era. I was surprised by the end of the journal that became mostly religious rants.
Gena
Jan 19, 2016 Gena rated it it was ok
Somewhat interesting diary of a young teenager in the antebellum period in Virginia. Not one of the more riveting of the historical diaries I have read, but it does give you a taste of the time.
Caroline Kipps
Apr 11, 2011 Caroline Kipps rated it liked it
A quick read of Agnes Lee's girlhood diary, from about 12 to 16. She was a middle daughter of Robert E. Lee. The diary all takes place prior to the Civil War, during her idyllic days at Arlington House and West Point. It offers a bit of insight into the Lee family during these years.
Becky Cornforth
Jan 02, 2013 Becky Cornforth rated it liked it
While this is not the most exciting book I've read, it is rather interesting to "see" the Lee family from the viewpoint of one of their daughters. They were rather distraught at having to leave their Arlington home.
Kimberly
Apr 21, 2014 Kimberly rated it really liked it
Shelves: at-hand
Interesting insight into the life of Robert E. Lee. His daughter's perspective.
BookDB
BookDB marked it as to-read
Sep 22, 2016
Deb Gaby
Deb Gaby marked it as to-read
Sep 14, 2016
Tehreem Hassan
Tehreem Hassan marked it as to-read
Aug 25, 2016
Sarah Gray
Sarah Gray marked it as to-read
Aug 22, 2016
Kristina Moore
Kristina Moore marked it as to-read
Aug 21, 2016
Lois
Lois marked it as to-read
Aug 09, 2016
Sarah
Sarah marked it as to-read
Jul 15, 2016
Winona
Winona marked it as to-read
Jul 03, 2016
Erick
Erick marked it as to-read
Jun 05, 2016
Mary Armstrong
Mary Armstrong rated it it was amazing
Jul 02, 2016
Megan Tiede
Megan Tiede rated it liked it
Apr 29, 2016
Maria Lake
Maria Lake marked it as to-read
Mar 30, 2016
Sam Rayburn
Sam Rayburn marked it as to-read
Feb 09, 2016
Beth
Beth rated it really liked it
Feb 23, 2016
Betsy
Betsy rated it really liked it
Feb 01, 2016
Anneharris Rahe
Anneharris Rahe rated it really liked it
Jan 23, 2016
Kim Boulden
Kim Boulden rated it liked it
Aug 16, 2016
Joe Walker
Joe Walker rated it really liked it
Dec 26, 2015
Kim Hampton
Kim Hampton marked it as to-read
Nov 10, 2015
Becky Roupp
Becky Roupp marked it as to-read
Oct 20, 2015
« previous 1 3 4 5 next »
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »
Eleanor Agnes Lee, Robert E. Lee's fifth child, began her journal in December 1852 at the early age of twelve. An articulate young woman, her stated ambitions were modest: "The everyday life of a little school girl of twelve years is not startling," she observed in April 1853; but in fact, her five-year record of a southern girl's life is lively, unpredictable, and full of interesting detail.
More about Agnes Lee...

Share This Book