Little Lit: Folklore and Fairy Tale Funnies
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Little Lit: Folklore and Fairy Tale Funnies (Little Lit #1)

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3.82 of 5 stars 3.82  ·  rating details  ·  282 ratings  ·  20 reviews
Little Lit: Folklore And Fairy Tale FunniesA treasure and a treasury!Innovative cartoonist and renowned children's book artists from around the world have gathered to bring you the magic of fairy tales through the wonder of comics. The stories range from old favorites to new discoveries, from the profound to the silly. A treat for all ages, these picture stories unlock the...more
Hardcover, 64 pages
Published October 31st 2000 by RAW Junior / Joanna Cotler (first published 2000)
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Ronyell
Little Lit

Did you ever think that fairy tale stories can be converted into comic strips? Well, it seems like they can since there is a brilliant collection of fairy tales stories being told through comic strips called “Little Lit: Folklore and Fairy Tale Funnies!” “Little Lit: Folklore and Fairy Tale Funnies” is a collection of various fairy tales that are shown in comic book strips and it is edited by Art Spiegelman and Francoise Mouly. For anyone who loves reading fairy tales and comic books, this graph...more
Wendy
Genre: Children’s, Fairytale, Graphic

Summary:

In this collection of slightly altered fairytales, each story is rendered as a comic strip with each cartoon reflecting the respective author and illustrator. The tails are reminiscent of the original, however, their perspective changes the outcome and provides a new story altogether.

Humpty Dumpty, The Princess and the Pea, and other classic tales accompany search and find and what’s wrong with this picture games. While on the surface this might app...more
Josephus FromPlacitas
Beautiful comics, amazing art, whether you're a kid or grown-up, you can lose yourself completely in these huge, ornate images by brilliant artists. One thing to review before giving it to a little kid might be to decide whether a couple of the more intense and grotesque stories would jive well with your little brain-voyager's personality. Not that kids can't or shouldn't handle weirdness, but it's worth feeling out beforehand.
Nicole Doerr
This is an amazing collection of folklore.The authors did a wonderful job with the stories and illustrations. This is intended for school age and up. This book contains many short fairy tales. The stories are told in comic strip form. The tails are similar to the original ones but the outcomes are slightly different, which provides a new out look. Children and adult can enjoy the funny and sweet tales such as The Princess and the Pea, Humpty Dumpty, and Rapunzel. It is very interesting the way s...more
Myrza
Spiegelman, A. (2000). Little Lit: Folklore and Fairy Tale Funnies. New York:
HarperCollins.
What a unique way to capture the young readers with a graphic novel that indulges them with a variety of folk and fairy tale favorites. With a twist to these favorite stories and captivating illustrations the kids will be enjoying the book. Honestly who doesn’t enjoy hearing these stories and in this captivating way, it’s really entertaining.
Megan Kirby
I had somehow never heard of these RAW-for-kids story adaptations edited by Spiegelman and Mouly until yesterday, when I found it at a used book store. These are stories for kids with plenty of smart writing and heavy-hitting comics artists to keep adults searching for more editions. Ware, Burns, Clowes, Kaz-- when I started flipping through I almost hyperventilated. And even better, it was a fun read with a good mix of classic fairy tales and more obscure folk tales.
Moe
Most of the stories had valuable lessons. Like one of them was do as you're told or else it change your whole entire life. The best parts was when there was this picture that had all these spooky pictures in black and white and it was a maze. It had creatures I don't even know about. What I liked best was the illustrations and how it was funny. The one about Rupunzel is really funny and full of mistakes.
Robin
A fun collection. Wonderful artwork by many different artists (William Joyce, David Macaulay, Walt Kelly and more) to tell/retell some familiar fairy tales, such as Jack and the Beanstalk, the Princess and the Pea, and the Gingerbread Man. Plus some fun interactive elements (what's wrong with this picture, find the hidden objects.) Large format, plus nice thick creamy paper.
Emily
This is a very cool collection of comic-style fairy tales done by some of the best comic artists around. Some are retellings of classic tales, others are stories you've never heard before. A variety of visual styles means there is something for every taste. A truly wonderful collection that recalls the Sunday comics of the early 20th century.
Eden
This is a collection of fairy tales, but they are comics and slightly different than the tales they originate from. Most of the tales tend to be funny and cute. The one tale I really enjoyed was The Fisherman and The Sea Princess. It was really a nice story, but had a very sad ending.

Overall, it was a fun collection of fairy tales.
Brandon Kurtich
Great short stories told for kids! It's not often that brand new fairy tales and fables are created (usually it's a new take on classic stories), but Spiegelman and the other great comic artists have created great works of arts for kids and adults.
Bears Library
These are fairy tales told in comic format. They are delightful and remind you of the books you read as a child. My favorite may have been the Fisherman and the Sea Princess. The Gingerbream Man drawings reminded me of yesteryear. :)
Juana "Darkness" Duran
It was really funny I recommend to everyone. Very cool how they portrayed the fairies and other characters of the story.
Elizabeth
Feb 19, 2013 Elizabeth marked it as to-read
As heard on The Writer's Almanac.
Deirdre Keating
Very cool and interesting, and possibly not the most appropriate gift for Santa to have given Aidan this year.
Miguel Gonzalez
Not for the kids. Well at least until they reach preteen age. Then it's too cool for school.
Kayleigh
A bunch of awkward fairy tales by graphic novel artists and illustrators and stuff. Very cute.
BookShorts  MovingStories.TV
I've had this book for years, but dip into it whenever I need a hit of inspiring whimsy.
Callie Rose Tyler
I think this would be a great book to grow up with
Emelia
Has a lot of funny comics! 8D
Amy
Amy is currently reading it
Sep 19, 2014
Karl Dotter
Karl Dotter marked it as to-read
Sep 12, 2014
Bardin
Bardin marked it as to-read
Sep 12, 2014
Sean Stevens
Sean Stevens marked it as to-read
Sep 10, 2014
Kathleen Kenny
Kathleen Kenny marked it as to-read
Sep 04, 2014
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Art Spiegelman (born Itzhak Avraham ben Zeev) is New-York-based comics artist, editor, and advocate for the medium of comics, best known for his Pulitzer Prize-winning comic memoir, Maus.
More about Art Spiegelman...
Maus, I: A Survivor's Tale: My Father Bleeds History (Maus, #1) Maus, II: And Here My Troubles Began (Maus, #2) The Complete Maus (Maus, #1-2) In the Shadow of No Towers MetaMaus: A Look Inside a Modern Classic, Maus

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