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Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach
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Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach

3.68  ·  Rating Details ·  194 Ratings  ·  15 Reviews

Human Physiology: An Integrated Approachbroke ground with its thorough coverage of molecular physiology seamlessly integrated into a traditional homeostasis-based systems approach . The newly revised Fourth Edition strengthens the coverage of the “big picture” themes in the study of physiology and helps students tie concepts together in a logical framework for learning.

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Hardcover, 912 pages
Published March 23rd 2006 by Pearson (first published 1997)
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Community Reviews

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Sadia
Jan 03, 2010 Sadia rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
excellent book, although i read it as a course material i learnt greatly from the book. The author has done a wonderful job making the book easy to understand yet grasp all the details and terms required for a physiology class. Highly Recommend the book - the CD is great as well!
Melissa
Jan 20, 2011 Melissa rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Wonderful textbook!
Madhavi Bhojraj
Jul 19, 2016 Madhavi Bhojraj rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This book is so good at laying things out clearly for a subject that is highly complex and dynamic. Although the book lacks a bit of the integration that is required for a discipline like Physiology, it gives the basic outline of how Physiology should be approached, mastered, and reviewed for better understanding (and grades haha). It also has VERY helpful images and diagrams that help to think through the material when the text isn't making sense. I would recommend this book to anyone taking an ...more
Myra Sullivan
A very good book with interesting case studies spread throughout each chapter. The language was easy, the explanations were thorough and overall it was readable. My only complaint is that it had a LOT of detail, but maybe it was written for a course that covered things in more depth than mine did. A lot of the time I skimmed over sections because there was just so much that I didn't need. Overall a good book.
Maria
May 10, 2007 Maria rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: science, schoolreads
Not my favorite class ever but that's what happens when you take something hard senior year. Also, I did not have and still do not have a desire to study any sort of medicine and this was directed towards future doctors.
Zachary Lawson
Jun 25, 2016 Zachary Lawson rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: science
One of the better texts out there. The writing is clear and concise. There are a plethora of diagrams and charts that really illuminate the concepts.
Chen
Oct 24, 2015 Chen rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: textbook
McGill, ANSC 323 - Mammalian physiology. Not a good textbook: general, vague and not-so-informative.
Jared Johnson
Jared Johnson rated it did not like it
Dec 17, 2015
Sunil
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Ali Azawi
Aug 03, 2016 Ali Azawi rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A book to learn many facts about human body, not sure how help it is with our school system. :)
Na
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“The common embryological origin of the endothelium and blood
cells perhaps explains why many cytokines that control hematopoiesis are released by the vascular endothelium.”
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“Ancient Chinese physicians linked blood to energy flow in
the body. They wrote about the circulation of blood through the
heart and blood vessels long before William Harvey described
it in seventeenth-century Europe. In China, changes in blood
flow were used as diagnostic clues to illness. Chinese physicians
were expected to recognize some 50 variations in the pulse. Because blood was considered a vital fluid to be conserved and
maintained, bleeding patients to cure disease was not a standard
form of treatment.”
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