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Equality and Partiality

3.92  ·  Rating Details ·  36 Ratings  ·  1 Review
Derived from Thomas Nagel's Locke Lectures, Equality and Partiality proposes a nonutopian account of political legitimacy, based on the need to accommodate both personal and impersonal motives in any credible moral theory, and therefore in any political theory with a moral foundation. Within each individual, Nagel believes, there is a division between two standpoints, the ...more
Paperback, 208 pages
Published March 19th 1995 by Oxford University Press, USA (first published 1991)
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Magda
Nov 14, 2011 Magda rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: kati, essay
Now, this is a book with a rich political argument. Nagel tries to find a way to support the idea that equality and impartiality can build the society of the future.
What is always charming about Nagel is his clever writing, his intellectual humor and the methodic presentation of all the theoretical aspects of his argument.
What I really distinguish from this book is the chapter about utopia, the arguments about charity and benevolence, the strength of the imagination on the possible future societ
...more
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Thomas Nagel is an American philosopher, currently University Professor and Professor of Philosophy and Law at New York University, where he has taught since 1980. His main areas of philosophical interest are philosophy of mind, political philosophy and ethics. He is well-known for his critique of reductionist accounts of the mind in his essay "What Is it Like to Be a Bat?" (1974), and for his con ...more
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