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Nuclear Turnaround: Recovery from Three Mile Island and the Lessons for the Future of Nuclear Power
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Nuclear Turnaround: Recovery from Three Mile Island and the Lessons for the Future of Nuclear Power

did not like it 1.0  ·  Rating Details ·  1 Rating  ·  1 Review
A Book for all who have an interest in Nuclear Power, whether pro or anti-nuclear. This story is based on interviews with over a score of people who participated in the Three Mile Island Accident, the Clean up, and the Recovery of General Public Utilities. The book covers Financial, Legal, Regulatory, Public Relations, Crisis Management and Technology areas and has Lessons ...more
Paperback, 156 pages
Published October 9th 2003 by Authorhouse
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Scott McCulloch
Feb 25, 2011 Scott McCulloch rated it did not like it
Not very good at all. Basically a PR move from someone who worked at the company that the Three Mile Island incident happened at. It's not outright biased, but it's also pretty clear that the author isn't worrying too much about presenting all sides to the story. Does give some interesting information about the recovery process from a non-technical standpoint.
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William Murray was an educational adviser at a borstal and later headmaster of a "school for the educationally subnormal" in Cheltenham. From research undertaken in the 1950s by Murray with Professor Joe McNally, an educational psychologist at Manchester University, Murray realised that only 12 words account for ¼, 100 words account for ½, and 300 words account for ¾ of the words used in normal ...more
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