The Sandman, Vol. 6: Fables and Reflections (The Sandman #6)
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The Sandman, Vol. 6: Fables and Reflections (The Sandman #6)

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4.45 of 5 stars 4.45  ·  rating details  ·  27,332 ratings  ·  495 reviews
Fables & Reflections (1993) is the sixth collection of issues in the DC Comics series, The Sandman. It was written by Neil Gaiman and illustrated by Bryan Talbot, Stan Woch, P. Craig Russell, Shawn McManus, John Watkiss, Jill Thompson, Duncan Eagleson, Kent Williams, Mark Buckingham, Vince Locke and Dick Giordano, coloured by Danny Vozzo and Lovern Kindzierski/Digital...more
Hardcover, 264 pages
Published January 1st 1993 by Vertigo DC Comics (first published April 1990)
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Algernon

Dreams are composed of many things, my son. Of images and hopes, of fears and memories. Memories of the past, and memories of the future...

Volume six is a collection of shorter stories, one-shot issues that may or may not be related to the main story arc, but they offer the author the chance to explore different aspects of the way Dreams shape our world and define our personalities. I actually believe Gaiman is better in this form than in the longer sequences, as he has more creative liberty a...more
StoryTellerShannon
THE SERIES

When introducing people to graphic novels (especially those who think they're just comic strip superheroes for kids with no depth) I point them in the direction of this beloved series. It chronicles the trials and tribulations of Dream, an Endless being who is something like an Old God who is superior to most known godly beings. He operates in many worlds most specifically Earth.

The Sandmanwas one of Vertigo's flagship titles, and is available as a series of tentrade paperbacks. It ha...more
Brooke
Fables & Reflections was probably my least favorite Sandman volume so far. While I delighted in the single-issue stories in Dream Country, the ones contained in this one didn't thrill me as much. I lost my focus a few times and wished there weren't so many grouped together without a common theme. Dream Country, on the other hand, was the perfect taste of outside-the-plot mini tales.

The stories about Orpheus were the most interesting, being the most relevant to Dream, and I found myself wishi...more
Anthony Chavez
Being the sixth volume in the Sandman series, "Reflections and Fables" takes a different twist than readers are accustomed to - a volume entirely of the past. There are nine stories in the volume, each relating to the Sandman universe in its own way, yet each remarkably different and unique in their own way (minus the Orpheus volumes).

The opening chapter, Fear of Falling, really a prologue, is in itself wonderfully written and in only a few pages it packs a powerful message. Other notable chapte...more
Teresa
Though the first seems more like a preface than a fully realized story, I was impressed by every one of the nine short stories in this volume, thus the 5 stars. While it's true that each is a standalone, some contain themes that seem to comment (reflect?) on each other; or include recurring characters, such as Orpheus, or even characters from the main storyline, such as Lyta and Johanna Constantine. I discovered another "comment/reflection" as I was, fittingly enough, falling asleep.

I was amused...more
Ronyell
After reading the fifth volume in Neil Gaiman’s fantastic “Sandman” series, “A Game of You,” I just had to read the sixth volume of the “Sandman” series called “Fables and Reflections.” In this volume, we are introduced to more miscellaneous stories that involve Morpheus and his siblings’ involvement with various characters’ dreams.

Just like the third volume of the “Sandman” series “Dream Country, “ “Fables and Reflections” is mainly a collection of different tales that detail the adventures tha...more
Rowena
I read a lot of graphic novels (Asterix, Tintin etc) as a child but this was probably my first adult graphic novel.I was seriously impressed. Despite the fact that it was a comic book, and I generally expect to see simple writing in those, the calibre of the writing was very high and the stories were quite intellectual and thought-provoking. The graphics were great too. And, as a history lover, seeing all the famous historical characters in this book was really quite cool.

Just one teensy little...more
Joey Karlin
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Andrew
Aug 29, 2007 Andrew rated it 5 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: Everyone
I used to stubbornly think that graphic novels had no intellectual merits other than for amateur entertainment (I know, pedestal). This series not only blew me away visually, but caused me to see graphic novels in a new light. Everyone should read this series.

Here's what i want to say, but someone else said it first and better than i could:
"Erudite, allusive, complex and ambitious, SANDMAN is undoubtedly the finest writing the mainstream comic book industry has ever seen. It dares to tell the st...more
Bunny
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Alex Ristea
My favourite volume so far.

Fables and Reflections is storytelling genius at its finest, and I am now convinced that Neil Gaiman has a certain mad spark, the same that can be found in Shakespeare, King, and so on.

"Ramadan," the final issue is one of the highlights of the series for me. The art and ideas were perfect, and I will be returning to this particular story over and over.

It's sometimes nice to have volumes of Sandman be a collection of short stories, so that re-reads can be done in any or...more
Airiz C
Fables and Reflections, like Dream Country, is comprised of stand-alone tales that explore the Sandman universe without directly zeroing in on the Endless themselves. There’s a lot to like here, but there are a few issues that I found a tad unsatisfying because some tales feel like they could use a sequel or something. Anyway, I guess that’s already given when it comes to compendiums—stories in them would never be of the same caliber.

I found the Vertigo preview about Todd Faber interesting. It’s...more
M. Rephun
Jul 29, 2009 M. Rephun rated it 4 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: Anyone who loves poetry, graphic novels, or good storytelling
Recommended to M. by: Discovered it on my own
This book, Fables and Reflections, is a very solid entry in Neil Gaiman's Sandman series. It features a variety of loosely connected stories that revolve around Dream of the Endless, and some of his siblings. Most of these stories are standalone issues: only one, which deals with Dream's relationship with his son Orpheus, plays a role in the larger Sandman saga. However, every one of these stories is infused with a poetic beauty and richness that showcases, if nothing else, Neil Gaiman's amazing...more
Thom Foolery
After reading two fairly profound, novel-length, "comic book" story arcs, I was expecting to that this collection of short stories would be filler, light stuff that Gaiman could crank out while catching his breath, preparing for the next run. Boy, was I wrong.

The first story in this collection, "Three Septembers and a January," brought me to tears as I read it on my lunch break. It tells the story of one Joshua Abraham Norton, the first and only Emperor of the United States, a man whose waking d...more
Gef
The last time I dove into The Sandman series was when I read Volume 5 back in May of last year. As it turns out it was this volume, Fables and Reflections, that originally garnered my interest for this series, because I had seen more than one list citing this the best of the entire series and in comics period.

Like a few of the other books in the series, this is a collection of stand-alone stories rather than one long narrative. There are some winks and nods to past storylines, though.

It started...more
Joshua Palmatier
This sixth volume in the Sandman series from Neil Gaiman is really just a compilation of various individual stories, not one continuous story like some of the other volumes. As with most such "anthologies," there are stories that I liked in here, and some that were just meh.

My favorite by far was Ramadan, the last story, not necessarily because of the story itself, but because of the artwork. After five volumes, some of the art that was once new and inventive and interesting has become old hat....more
Aliza
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Ryan Rebel
Jun 11, 2011 Ryan Rebel rated it 5 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: Anyone who enjoys a good story.
Recommended to Ryan by: Mr. K
Shelves: reviewed
This is the second time I've read this particular entry in the Sandman series, and it doesn't cease to amaze. It's no wonder an issue of Sandman won the World Fantasy Award (I believe that's what it was called) much to the chagrin of many purists who refused to accept graphic novels as a viable medium. The fact is, Sandman is scads better than almost all of the traditional books I have ever read.

This particular compilation is a must read, particularly for history lovers, particularly for those i...more
Mark
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Mary Overton
A collection of stories about fabulous people and places.
From "Soft Places":
"Time at the edge of the dreaming is softer than elsewhere, and here in the soft places it loops and whorls on itself. In the soft places where the border between dreams and reality is eroded, or has not yet formed .... In the soft places, where the geographies of dream intrude upon the real.... There were more of them in the olden days. I remember, when I was just a young vicinity, there were soft places everywhere .......more
Siria
I really liked this one; Season of Mists is still perhaps my favourite, but this isn't that far behind. It's not really moving the overall story so much as fleshing out the universe, and if you know me at all, you will know that that kind of exploration is always a serious hook for me.

I though 'Fear of Falling' was perhaps the weakest - maybe because I've never really seen Morpheus as someone who would just show up randomly and start offering advice or revelation - but the rest of the stories we...more
Nikki
Fables & Reflections is another volume that instead of having a story running through it, collects nine different stories. I didn't like this as much as I do the ones that have a whole story running through the whole volume -- which doesn't mean it's bad, that's just my preference.

The stories are interesting, in themselves. I particularly liked the one about Orpheus -- Calliope! -- and the last one in the volume, Ramadan. I really liked the art in both of those, as well, although the art in...more
Elías Fernández
Una cosa es crear un universo de la nada. Y otra es adaptarlo a la historia y sus mitos.

Las historias de Sandman que transcurren en la antigua Roma, o Grecia, o Egipto, o en la Revolución Francesa, o en la Inglaterra de Shakespeare son la clara prueba de que Gaiman es un hijo de puta talentoso e hiperimaginativo.

Con muy poco momentos álgidos, las siete historias de este tomo son sencillamente una delicia repleta de guiños históricos que, para qué mentir, uno puede disfrutar mucho más metiéndose...more
Yehia Shehata
I'm past the midpoint of this wonderful series. Writing the review as I read:


0. Fear of Falling: "It is sometimes a mistake to climb; it is always a mistake never to make the attempt." "If you do not climb you will not fall. This is true. But is it that bad to fail, that hard to fall?" A short intro. Didn't like the drawing style here that much, but these quotes made up for it. I don't know how this fits in with anything yet, though.

1. Three Septembers and a January: The heartbreaking story of T...more
Federiken Masters
Mar 03, 2010 Federiken Masters rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Todo el mundo.
Recommended to Federiken by: Los tomos anteriores.
Mi libro favorito de todo Sandman. No por el dibujo ni por los guiones, que son excelentes -los segundos más que los primeros-, sino porque es el que mejor representa el espíritu sandmaniano: relatos cortos, cerrados y redonditos y aparentemente inconexos que suman muchísimo al todo final. Además, tiene una de mis historietas favoritas de todos los tiempos como es Ramadán. Un clásico instantáneo que seguro se gane una relectura y una rerreseña pronta.
Scott
This was one set of stories I didn't remember much at all from my reading back when the comics were first published. I tend to prefer the contemporary tales to the historical/mythological ones collected here. These were spread out in the original run, and grouped together they made me anxious to return to the present. Still, they are very good, and I think I appreciate them more now that I'm older. "Ramadan," in particular, is exquisite.
Kat
I'm back to being utterly in love with this series. More historical figures pop up in this volume, which is more of a series of stories than a single narrative. I love seeing how people of different cultures view Dream- his appearance changes for all of them. Seeing the story Cain tells with a chibi version of Death and Dream makes the whole volume worth it- seriously. :) Very fun, on to the next.
Nada Elfeituri
This was a mixed bag for me. A total of eight (or is it nine?) short stories, some were great, some were average, and others were just yawn-worthy. I would say 'The Hunt' and "Three Septembers and a January" were my favorite, while the rest were varying levels of okay-ish.
I feel as though some of the initial charm and novelty this series had on me has begun to wear off.
Sara Forsberg
Neil Gaiman' the Sandman continues to stun and impress. This collection of stories features many famous historical figures seen in a bit of a different light, as well as the tragic story of Orpheus, Dream's son. It also features the first appearance of the Little Endless - probably the most adorable creatures concieved of in graphic literature :P. Read!
Jeannie
These nine short stories stand apart from the main arc of The Sandman, but each contributes to the larger mythos of Morpheus, the Dream King. Though sometimes sexually and violently explicit, per usual for this series, each tale was lovely in its own way. I particularly enjoyed "The Hunt," "The Song of Orpheus," and "Ramadan."
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“Sometimes you wake up. Sometimes the fall kills you. And sometimes, when you fall, you fly.” 5546 likes
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