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Clarissa Harlowe or the History of a Young Lady, V1 (of 9)

3.21  ·  Rating Details  ·  89 Ratings  ·  13 Reviews
Samuel Richardson (1689-1761) was a major English 18th century writer. He had been an established printer and publisher for most of his life when, at the age of 51, he wrote his first novel and immediately became one of the most popular and admired writers of his time. In 1733 he wrote The Apprentice's Vade Mecum, urging young men like himself to be diligent and self-denyi ...more
Paperback, 288 pages
Published April 14th 2004 by IndyPublish.com
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Nicole
Aug 15, 2014 Nicole rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Ooookay... so Volume 1 of 9. Here is a quick synopsis of nearly 200 pages:

Clarissa (with the back of her hand pressed to her forehead in classically melodramatic style): "I shant! I shant marry Mr. Solmes. Please just let me be single!"

Various family members: "Why must you be so obstinate and spoiled? You're locked in the house until you learn to obey."

Mr. Lovelace lurks in the shadows and plots how he can conquer Clarissa, although her family despises him since he tried to kill her brother in a
...more
Ashley W
Jan 09, 2016 Ashley W rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: classics, 1700s
This novel is over 1,500 pages and luckily, I found out that it is on the Kindle for free and printed into 9 volumes, so this review is about the first volume. The novel follows titular character, Clarissa Harlowe, a young good and virtuous woman, who is lusted after by the creepy Robert Lovelace. After her brother and Lovelace duel, Clarissa is being made to marry a horrifying man named Mr. Solmes because her family believes she is in love with Lovelace. She refuses to marry Mr. Solmes because ...more
Leah
Aug 13, 2014 Leah rated it liked it
Shelves: epistolary, classics
Epistolary novels require a certain amount of willing suspension of disbelief, and this one is no exception. Clarissa's story is a tragic one that comes across at times like a morality play, and it definitely has some strong opinions about the characters within.
Rosemary
Mar 20, 2014 Rosemary rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 1001-books
My goodness, she does witter on. Admittedly she's young but really very silly too. I will not be reading the other volumes - at least, not at any foreseeable time. However, Richardson does an amazing job of getting inside the head of his character.
Kathleen
Sep 11, 2008 Kathleen rated it it was amazing
Longer than War & Peace, told entirely in letters, practically in real time. It's like watching paint dry, only more dark, claustrophobic and creepy. This is one of the most amazing books I have ever read, but not for the faint of heart!
Corinna
Oct 16, 2012 Corinna rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
I'm just so happy I finally finished it. And I read the abridged version...
Lisa
Jan 24, 2013 Lisa rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Lot of letters between friends - could have said as much in less but there you go!
So far, Mr Lovelace has been introduced to Clarissa's sister when really he meant to be introduced to Clarissa; he therefore turns the sister down and turns his addresses to Clarissa, who is not interested. Sister Bella is not happy with this and joins forces with spoilt, selfish brother James who is displeased that Clarissa has been left independent property by their grandfather - property that would normally hav
...more
Wendy
Feb 11, 2016 Wendy rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
English 540A: English Fiction, 18th C Novel - Main characters are Clarissa, Lovelace, Anna Howe, and Clarissa's family, the Harlowes. A novel that is told completely through correspondence. A story about a young woman who tries to make decisions for herself but is thwarted by her family and societal mores of the time. A very long, confusing, boring novel (and we read the abridged version).
Niniva
Jan 24, 2015 Niniva rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
A bid longer than...

The writing is very well done, the drama very thoughtful, and impressive way put together with letters. However, the main body of the drama and arguments draw much over and over and sometimes overwhelming.
Diana
Jan 31, 2014 Diana rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2014-classics
Well - not for me!
Scott Harris
Having just forced myself to finish Vol.1 of this novel, I can't imagine reading the remaining volumes despite the fact that so much of the drama seems to lie ahead. This first volume seemed like an interminable self-examination of several characters getting nowhere in their argument about the appropriateness of a suitor. In the end, they all come across as whiny, self-absorbed prats. It felt droning and repetitive.
Kristen
Feb 27, 2015 Kristen rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Oh my goodness - I've never read a more boring book in my life. I was interested for the first quarter of the book and enjoying the writing but then it was like Groundhog day. The same thing over and over again. I forced myself to finish it but I won't be reading books 2-9.
Amy Wolf
Not going to tell you this is the most scintillating thing ever written, but it is an interesting look into the development of the novel. This one is in epistolary form. RIchardson was a big influence on Jane Austen.
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17505
Samuel Richardson was a major English 18th century writer best known for his three epistolary novels: Pamela: Or, Virtue Rewarded (1740), Clarissa: Or the History of a Young Lady (1748) and Sir Charles Grandison (1753).

Richardson had been an established printer and publisher for most of his life when, at the age of 51, he wrote his first novel and immediately became one of the most popular and adm
...more
More about Samuel Richardson...

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“For love must be a very foolish thing to look back upon, when it has brought persons born to affluence into indigence, and laid a generous mind under obligation and dependence.” 5 likes
“to be courted as princesses for a few weeks, in order to be treated as slaves for the rest of our lives.” 2 likes
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