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The Latest Answers to the Oldest Questions: A Philosophical Adventure with the World's Greatest Thinkers

3.52  ·  Rating Details ·  60 Ratings  ·  10 Reviews
The work of the classic philosophers is well known. But where can the general reader discover what today’s philosophers believe about what it is to be a human being? In his serious, challenging, and remarkably accessible new book, Nicholas Fearn turns to contemporary philosophers to ask the age old questions: Who am I? What do I know? What should I do? In a work that is pa ...more
Hardcover, 256 pages
Published January 16th 2007 by Grove Press (first published March 21st 2006)
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Anand Gopal
Aug 14, 2008 Anand Gopal rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: philosophy
The book's subtitle reads: The Latest Answers to the Oldest Questions.

Fearn interviews the best of the living philosphers--John Searle, Richard Rorty, Peter Singer, Noam Chomsky, David Chalmers, Jerry Fodor, Daniel Dennett and more--in a series of expositions about free will, the mind-body problem, postmodernism, pragamatism, the language of thought, etc.

The result is a sometimes useful but mostly pointless rendering of these philosophical problems. The "interviews" are too poorly presented (e
...more
Kaitlin
Sep 20, 2012 Kaitlin rated it really liked it
This is a fantastic intro-philosophy book covering a broad range of topics and philosophers. Fearn included a ton of high level, academic information and made it interesting and relevant.

You do have to be paying full attention while reading this, and I found myself rereading certain passages to understand them completely. However, on the whole I found it very readable though not dumbed down.

This works as a leisure read if you are interested in philosophy and willing to do some thinking. It woul
...more
Gerhard
Dec 23, 2010 Gerhard rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: philosophy
A book that tries to bridge the, admittedly large, gap between academic philosophy and the layperson. The end result is something that errs on the side of the former rather than the latter. I would recommend it to anyone interested in the “frontiers” of the subject, but YOU HAVE TO BE INTERESTED IN PHILOSOPHY to enjoy it. If this sounds like your cup of tea, expect something that is satisfying at times and challenging throughout.
Steve
Jul 14, 2011 Steve rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A great little book introducing important philosophical questions and some of the contemporary "answers" offered by modern philosophers. Claims to be a conversation with these philosophers but never really feels like it. Nonetheless, worth reading for those who want a short introduction without wanting the whole history of philosophy.
Andrew
Sep 27, 2008 Andrew rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: philosophy
This is an interesting book because it isn't just a collection of previously printed ideas of dead thinkers. Most of the philosphers quoted in this book are still alive and were interviewed for the book about timeless questions. Those that weren't interviewed are mainly 20th century figures at least.
David Gross
Aug 06, 2007 David Gross rated it liked it
Shelves: non-fiction
Kind of like being a tourist in a classy foreign city, your mind gets to wander aimlessly and wherever it goes it sees something interesting, delightful, or worth taking a snapshot of.
Subhash Jha
Feb 11, 2016 Subhash Jha rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
The book gives the reader a deep insight into the self as well as the environment and the world at large of which he/she is a part.
It's a deeply intriguing and compelling read.
David Williamson
Sep 17, 2011 David Williamson rated it really liked it
Shelves: philosophy
This book is much better than the earlier 'Zeno and the Tortoise', engaging ideas expressed with depth and clarity.
Ron
Jan 17, 2009 Ron rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
A nice introduction into perennial (and personally relevant) philosophical problems.
Chris
May 05, 2011 Chris rated it really liked it
Solid stuff. Good read.
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