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Naked is the Best Disguise: The Death and Resurrection of Sherlock Holmes
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Naked is the Best Disguise: The Death and Resurrection of Sherlock Holmes

3.23  ·  Rating Details ·  35 Ratings  ·  9 Reviews
Paperback, 253 pages
Published June 30th 1975 by Penguin Books
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Bev
Apr 08, 2014 Bev rated it did not like it
Naked Is the Best Disguise: The Death and Resurrection of Sherlock Holmes by Samuel Rosenberg is a literary criticism revolving around Sherlock Holmes, but unlike most Holmesian critiques it focuses on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle more than on examining the works themselves for the sake of the work. Rosenberg speculates that Doyle left clues throughout his work that reveal hidden meanings and connections between the Holmes stories (and other of Doyle's work) and Nietsche, Oscar Wilde, Dionysus, ...more
robyn
Jan 29, 2012 robyn rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: sherlockiana
It actually took me two tries to get through this book. The first time I read a few pages and then put it down thinking, this guy is manic. Crazy.

The second time, I got past that initial giddy hump and read it all the way through. Some of is really interesting; from the evidence provided in the stories themselves, I can believe Rosenberg is right in linking various Holmes characters to real people. He's good at providing supporting evidence to prove that Doyle would have known the person, and li
...more
Robert J. Sullivan
Jan 20, 2011 Robert J. Sullivan rated it it was amazing
Once you've read the Sherlock Holmes stories, this opens your eyes to what Doyle is actually doing in the stories. It adds layers that I never knew or even considered. Once you read this, you can't read the stories without thinking of this book.

Doyle wrote in people as characters (Professor Moriarty is Nietszche! Holmes is Frankenstein!), referred to classic works of literature in the plots, and played games with sex, adultery, and sexual identity.

I think a lot of literary analysis is thumb-twi
...more
Robert J. Sullivan
Once you've read the Sherlock Holmes stories, this opens your eyes to what Doyle is actually doing in the stories. It adds layers that I never knew or even considered. Once you read this, you can't read the stories without thinking of this book.

Doyle wrote in people as characters (Professor Moriarty is Nietszche! Holmes is Frankenstein!), referred to classic works of literature in the plots, and played games with sex, adultery, and sexual identity.

I think a lot of literary analysis is thumb-twi
...more
Robert J. Sullivan
Once you've read the Sherlock Holmes stories, this opens your eyes to what Doyle is actually doing in the stories. It adds layers that I never knew or even considered. Once you read this, you can't read the stories without thinking of this book.

Doyle wrote in people as characters (Professor Moriarty is Nietszche! Holmes is Frankenstein!), referred to classic works of literature in the plots, and played games with sex, adultery, and sexual identity.

I think a lot of literary analysis is thumb-twi
...more
Robert J. Sullivan
Once you've read the Sherlock Holmes stories, this opens your eyes to what Doyle is actually doing in the stories. It adds layers that I never knew or even considered. Once you read this, you can't read the stories without thinking of this book.

Doyle wrote in people as characters (Professor Moriarty is Nietszche! Holmes is Frankenstein!), referred to classic works of literature in the plots, and played games with sex, adultery, and sexual identity.

I think a lot of literary analysis is thumb-twi
...more
Nathanael Booth
Sep 14, 2013 Nathanael Booth rated it liked it
This book is a winding, endlessly idiosyncratic look at the Doylean corpus. Some of the author's interpretations are plausible; some (like his reading of "The Red Headed League") are so bizarre that they boggle the mind. All the same, this book presents an entertaining jaunt through a limitless number of suggestions--and so for that (not for scholarly value or rigor) it is to be recommended.
Evan
Jun 20, 2016 Evan rated it it was ok
Shelves: read-2016
The literary equivalent of chemtrails. But a good raconteur with some fun anecdotes.

The art of 'reading between the lines' brought to an apotheosis of subjective speculation. But it's all good fun.
Joseph Smigelski
Any fan of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories will love this brilliant, wild and crazy (maybe not so crazy) exegesis.
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