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The Imaginary Indian: The Image of the Indian in Canadian Culture
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The Imaginary Indian: The Image of the Indian in Canadian Culture

3.9 of 5 stars 3.90  ·  rating details  ·  40 ratings  ·  5 reviews
Now entering a seventh printing, and with over 18,000 copies sold, "The Imaginary Indian" is a fascinating, revealing history of the "Indian" image mythologized by popular Canadian culture since 1850, propagating stereotypes that exist to this day. Images of the Indian have always been fundamental to Canadian culture. From the paintings and photographs of the nineteenth ce ...more
Paperback, 260 pages
Published July 1st 2002 by Arsenal Pulp Press (first published January 1st 1992)
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Malcolm
It is a notable characteristic of colonies of settlement that their indigenous peoples are often used as a way to mark distinctiveness even when there seems to have been a colonial policy of extermination (the US is an exception to the first but not second part of that statement). In this engaging, accessible and carefully developed account Francis explores various ways that the Canadian state (and its colonial predecessors) grasped the means to define 'Indianness' by writing them out of the pas ...more
Jarrah
The Imaginary Indian: The Image of the Indian in Canadian Culture (originally published in 1992, re-issued in 2011) is an interesting study of how First Nations Canadians have been portrayed in many facets of Canadian culture through history. It’s widely used as a textbook and tries its hardest to be sensitive to the potential problems that arise from being a book on First Nations written by white men (the use of the term “Indian” is only used to refer to the white-constructed image of Aborigina ...more
Whitney
A good overview of mainstream images of Native Americans (Canadians). I especially appreciated the Canadian-centricity - aiming a lens north of our border to bring into focus events from a new point of view.
Timothy Favelle
Great book, easy to read and understand, well organized and full of information contrasting the first nations of Canada with the indians of Canadian imagination. I quite enjoyed it.
Su Abeille
The author being white felt wrong some how
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