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Animals as Persons: Essays on the Abolition of Animal Exploitation

4.20  ·  Rating Details  ·  87 Ratings  ·  7 Reviews
A prominent and respected philosopher of animal rights law and ethical theory, Gary L. Francione is known for his criticism of animal welfare laws and regulations, his abolitionist theory of animal rights, and his promotion of veganism and nonviolence as the baseline principles of the abolitionist movement. In this collection, Francione advances the most radical theory of ...more
Hardcover, 235 pages
Published June 17th 2008 by Oneworld Pub (first published April 30th 2008)
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Jasreet Badyal
May 04, 2012 Jasreet Badyal rated it it was amazing
Gary Francione writes a convincing and accessible argument for the abolitionist theory regarding animal rights. This is a collection of academic articles that have been published in various journals compiled into one book. This means there is a certain degree of repetition between the articles.

His writing is excellent. He uses point-first writing, limited use of the passive voice, and solid organization. Moreover, it is written in a way that can be understood by a broad group of people as it is
...more
Monica Barratt
Apr 11, 2010 Monica Barratt rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
As an aspiring vegan, this book was a must read. It introduced to me a clear argument for abolitionist animal rights. I have felt something change in me in the strength and ease of my commitment to living a vegan life as I read Francione's argument and his ideas. It also gives me hope that the world can change and I can be a positive part of that change. :)
Corvus
Apr 11, 2016 Corvus rated it did not like it
Lots of talk with very little applicability. Francione's work is very devoted to narcisstic ways of lifting himself up and maligning everyone who doesn't worship him as infallible. He's done more damage to animal liberation and rights movements than many animal agricultural groups have.
virgodura
Essays that would no doubt be enjoyed by an insufferable, needlessly inflammatory, unbelievably fatuous Morrissey-type. But he's not entirely wrong.
Liza
Mar 08, 2012 Liza rated it it was amazing
Francine writes a very convincing argument promoting veganism and the necessity for a change in the legal status of animals as property. This book is a must for those thinking about going vegan as well as for those skeptics who don't understand why anyone would want to. In particular, Francione's belief that the
animal welfare movement tends to do more harm than good on a wider scale is a defining factor in the split between animal rights activists, so anyone interested in these arguments would b
...more
Rift Vegan
Jul 20, 2014 Rift Vegan rated it liked it
Shelves: 2008, vegan
I like what Francione has to say... but all these essays are reprints, and they all basically say the same thing. Sadly, not worth the insane 40$ they're charging! Get it at the library if you must read it!! :)

The most interesting essays -- same rehashing but with a few new ideas -- were at the end of the book.
Lisa
May 09, 2011 Lisa rated it liked it
Convincing but repetitive. Man, I don't wanna be a vegan! I know I should! But I don't wanna!
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A prominent and respected philosopher of animal rights law and ethical theory, Gary L. Francione is known for his criticism of animal welfare laws and regulations, his abolitionist theory of animal rights, and his promotion of veganism and nonviolence as the baseline principles of the abolitionist movement. Unlike Peter Singer, Francione maintains that we cannot morally justify using animals under ...more
More about Gary L. Francione...

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“In sum, reliance on cognitive characteristics beyond sentience to justify the use of nonhumans in experiments requires either that we assume that these characteristics are morally relevant or that we ignore the fact that we do not regard the lack of such characteristics as morally relevant where humans are concerned. We are left with one and only one reason to explain our differential treatment of animals: We are human and they are not, and species difference alone justifies differential treatment. But this criterion is entirely arbitrary and no different from maintaining that, although there is no special characteristic possessed only by whites, or no defect possessed by blacks that is not also possessed by whites, we may treat blacks as inferior to whites merely on the basis of race. It is also no different from saying that, although there is no special characteristic possessed only by men or no defect possessed only by women, we may treat women as inferior to men based merely on sex.” 2 likes
“Animal rights theory seeks to move at least some nonhumans from the “thing” side of the “person / thing” dualism over to the “person” side. There are at least two reasons to offer in favor of this move. First, there is no characteristic or set of characteristics that is possessed by all humans (whom we regard as persons) that is not possessed by at least some animals. To put the matter a different way, those who support animal exploitation argue that animals are qualitatively different from humans so animals can be kept on the “thing” side of the “person / thing” dualism; animal rights advocates argue that there is no such difference because at least some nonhumans will possess the supposedly “exclusive” characteristic while some humans will not possess the characteristic. Nor is it enough to argue that species difference is itself morally relevant; after all, to rely on species alone as morally relevant is to assume what needs to be proved by those who hold such a view, and is morally indistinguishable from using race, sex, sexual orientation, or ability to determine membership in the moral community of persons. In other words, there is no reason to exclude animals from the progressive concept of personhood that has been developed.” 2 likes
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