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Testosterone: Sex, Power, and the Will to Win

3.42  ·  Rating Details ·  26 Ratings  ·  3 Reviews
We inherit mechanisms for survival from our primeval past; none so obviously as those involved in reproduction. The hormone testosterone underlies the organization of activation of masculinity: it changes the body and brain to make a male. It is involved not only in sexuality but in driving aggression, competitiveness, risk-taking - all elements that were needed for ...more
Hardcover, 256 pages
Published June 30th 2015 by Oxford University Press, USA (first published March 14th 2015)
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Caidyn
Still on vacation so I'll make this a quick one.

Right away when I delved into this, I found myself at home with the discussion. I've researched some of the things he brought up in accordance to transsexualism being a medical condition not a mental illness. Specifically I've looked into CAH, PCOS, genetics, and a little bit into brain structure. And all these things are touched upon in here. Yet, for those who aren't familiar with much of the topic, he offers explanations -- and reexplaining afte
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Nick
Sep 05, 2015 Nick rated it it was ok
Despite the brevity of this book - it is a little under 200 pages - I struggled into the final chapter, and limped over the finish line with a relieved slump.

Herbert is a celebrated academic, and a clear and articulate writer. However, this book is a great example of how some subjects simply do not transfer into popular culture. It should have remained as an ongoing discussion in the peer - review literature, but instead, this book priced at 16 has been crowbarred onto the shelves.

The real probl
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Jeremy John
Dec 14, 2015 Jeremy John rated it liked it
In reading this, I learned most of what can be communicated on the subject of testosterone. There were many caveats throughout this book, as the author is an academic. However, I prefer that to the specific-theory-driven narratives of popular neuroscience that often obfuscate the debates that underlie opinions in a field.

It was not terribly easy to read for that reason, and I found the authors use of the "he" pronoun to refer to "humanity" rather confusing, as it was unclear whether he was speak
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“The human brain has evolved methods of warfare that go beyond the use of weapons. For example, greater access to information may influence those called upon to fight, or support, such wars (e.g. encouraging group cohesion or demonizing an enemy: the ‘narrative’ of war151); but there are increasingly powerful methods of disseminating misinformation by those wishing to promote conflict. It is these newer areas of the brain that enable the extraordinary and unique technological evolution in humans. One consequence of this has been to alter the biological and social advantages of going to war. But deeper in the brain lie other, more ancient mechanisms, respondent to testosterone (and other hormones) that can bias such decisions one way or another. As in so many other contexts, at some point one has to consider the brain as a whole, rather than ascribing individual actions or outcomes to specific areas. Logic, memory, cognition, and emotion are intertwined in decisions to go to war. But testosterone lies at the core of this mix. We cannot always rely on ancient tendencies being moderated by more recently developed parts of the brain.” 0 likes
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