Emergence: Labeled Autistic
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating

Emergence: Labeled Autistic

4.08 of 5 stars 4.08  ·  rating details  ·  1,135 ratings  ·  115 reviews
An inspiring firsthand account of a courageous and determined autistic woman who makes a remarkable discovery that eventually helps her control her condition and virtually cure her disorder captures the isolation and fears suffered by autistic children.
Paperback, 200 pages
Published September 1st 1996 by Grand Central Publishing (first published 1986)
more details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.
Running Scarred by Jackie WilliamsSebastian by Christoph FischerThe Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark HaddonThe Memory Keeper's Daughter by Kim EdwardsLook Me in the Eye by John Elder Robison
Stories about Individuals with Disabilities
20th out of 247 books — 127 voters
Forever, Christian by Tina TraverseThe Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark HaddonAutism & Asperger's Syndrome in Layman's Terms. Your Guide to... by Raymond Le BlancBeyond the Austic Plateau - A Parent's Story and Practical He... by Stephen PitmanAutism - What Do You Need To Know? A Parent's Guide To Autism... by Raymond Le Blanc
Books About Autism
12th out of 78 books — 80 voters


More lists with this book...

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 2,708)
filter  |  sort: default (?)  |  rating details
Catherine
Temple Grandin is autistic. This - her first autobiography - is more complex a work than I expected from someone with autism, and also a more simple work than anything written by most people who study it. That Grandin is able to write a narrative of her life is an incredible achievement, due in no small part to her mother's diligence in finding great teachers for her daughter. It's also indicative of the fact that autism can "improve" over time - or at least an autistic individual adds to their...more
Mom
This was an amazing book written by an amazing woman. I admire her so much. I wish I could have achieved in my life at least half of what she has. Her advice and message in this book stand true. My experience with working with those afflicted with autism has led me to the same conclusions as what she presents in her book. I recommend this book highly to everyone. It is a window to the inner-workings of the mind.
Katsumi
Temple Grandin succeeds in pulling her audience into her world. That world is as mysterious to those of us who are "normal" as an alien planet is to earthlings. We can now understand a little better what is going on in the mind of an autistic person. I highly recommend this book, especially for all of us who are blessed to have an autistic loved one in our families.
Joy H.
Feb 02, 2011 Joy H. marked it as decided-not-to-read-it
I watched a film adapted from this book, _Emergence_.
Below is a copy of my comment (at my group) concerning the film:
===============================================================
I just finished watching the Netflix DVD of "Temple Grandin". I gave it 5 stars out of 5. It won many Emmy Awards. I found it amazing.
"Temple Grandin" (2010)
http://www.netflix.com/Movie/Temple_G...
"Claire Danes stars as Temple Grandin, a brilliant young woman coping with the stigma of autism ..."

http://www.imdb.com/tit...more
Kakihara
Aug 17, 2010 Kakihara rated it 5 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: Adults with or without autistic Children
Recommended to Kakihara by: Sachiel
Autism is a world beyond our world, a world we can only access if we really want to do it. I would like to congratulate Temple Grandin for being so brave in sharing with us all her knowledge she has accumulated during these years, if we learn to understand how this world works for autistic people, that is for sure we are going to make it a better place for everybody. Now that I know little bit more about autism and asperger than I knew before, I am glad to say that I am actually applying all of...more
Rachel
Grandin's first autobiography outlines her story of growing up in an era when autism was poorly understood to become a successful, functioning adult who has contributed extensively to animal studies as well as serving as an advocate for individuals with autism. The memoir is short, less than two hundred pages, and includes her own recounting as well as letters that her mother sent to various specialists, educators, as well as to Grandin. What emerges is the fact that Grandin's life would have be...more
Dahlene
Wow! If you've never heard of Temple Grandin you need to find out about her. She is an amazing woman. A friend told me to rent the movie, "Temple Grandin" from Netflix. I was so in awe as I watched this true story unfold. Temple was born in the 1950's with autism. The doctor told her mother that all they could do for her is to institutionalize her. Her mother refused and made her attend a boarding school. She pushed her from there to go to college knowing how brilliant Temple's mind was. After w...more
Irene
Mar 08, 2010 Irene rated it 3 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: Teenagers and people interested in autism
Recommended to Irene by: Inspired to read it after seeing "Temple Grandin" movie
Shelves: biography-memoir
I was inspired to read this book after watching the HBO movie Temple Grandin, which I highly recommend. The movie takes some artistic license, but overall, it really seems to portray Temple Grandin well.

This book is written mostly as a memoir, with information about autism studies, and Temple's own opinions about autism-related matters, interspersed in relevant places. Though Temple Grandin is neither a doctor nor a researcher, she writes with authority on a wide range of topics related to autis...more
Mary
Temple Grandin has been a super-hero of mine for quite some time. Oliver Sachs first introduced her to me but I hadn't read any of her work until this book found its way into my heart. I wish I would have read this book earlier, it now makes so much sense . . . the fixations, the high sensitivity to the tactile feeling of clothes on one's skin, the temper tantrums, etc. For those challenged with special children (or adults), reading this book is sure to bring comfort and hope. Temple brings us i...more
Diana (Bever) Barber
In trying to understand my boys better, I picked up this book. It blessed me to do what I set out to do with the added measure of understanding myself better. Now I'm absolutely sure that "Asperger's" is not only the label that fits my boys, but it is what I have been dealing for as long as I can remember (as well as dyslexic and dyspraxic which often accompany Austism-spectrum challenges). We can learn to work around our challenges--to learn from them--and become productive members of society....more
Kathy
I saw this book and thought it was amazing that an autistic person could be the writer, and be living a 'normal' life. I want to know more, as my nephew is autistic. So far, it's an amazing view inside the head of an autistic person!
A little repetitive over all, but what an interesting insight.
Natalie
This book was more complex than I was expecting, but it was very interesting. I work with children with Autism, so this gave me a better look into the world of Autism. I am very inspired by Temple Grandin and all that she has done with her life.
Kit
I thoroughly enjoy Dr. Grandin's writing for its raw honesty and sensible reasoning. This, her first book, is an invaluable insight into the early days of awareness and help for ASD children and adults.

She emphasizes above all that it is caring concern and loving guidance that is of most benefit to Autistic people. Now, nearly 20 years after the publication of this book, that essential truth remains. Regardless of advances in understanding and therapies, it is the family, friends, and teachers...more
McKenzie Richardson
Temple Grandin is such an amazing person. I really enjoyed this book. It was well put-together and easy to follow. Grandin's insight into her experience with autism is awe-inspiring. Having read her book Thinking in Pictures: My Life with Autism first, this book clarified a lot of important concepts that I did not fully understand the importance of previously, such as the symbol of doors. If you are at all interested in Autism Spectrum Disorders, I highly recommend this book. It's a quick read a...more
Lydia LaPutka
I was fortunate to be gifted this book from a sweet friend. This allowed me to read it with a highlighter in hand, noting parts that I felt were important to me as an educator. I love that Ms. Grandin's beliefs often matched my own when it comes to medication. She stated, "In young children with a new diagnosis of autism, it is often best to try some of the biomedical approaches such as the casein-free (milk) and gluten-free (wheat) diets. Special diets have helped some children." I would add th...more
Marci
My book club selection for this month was Emergence: Labeled Autistic, by Temple Grandin. I found the book quite interesting and it was a rather quick read. It is written, with help, by an autistic woman who has been able to, in a sense, overcome her disability to make some wonderful discoveries and developments in livestock equipment. While I enjoyed reading the book, what I really found fascinating was our book club discussion on it. Two of the women in our group have autistic children and I f...more
Alice
I'd been reading a lot of nonfiction books this year, and I'd noticed that most of them left out the experiences of people with disabilities or mental illness. Over the last few weeks, I've been making a concerted effort to pick up more books about disabilities. So, somehow, this is the second book by Temple Grandin I've read in the last month.

Emergence: Labeled Autistic is a familiar story if you've seen the HBO movie with Claire Danes in the title role. It covers Temple's growing up with autis...more
Katie
I found out about Temple Grandin in an odd bout of serendipity.

First, I saw her newest book at the UCI bookstore (already in itself a serendipitous meeting, since that entire trip was a whim). A few days later, I read a great paper that she wrote in 2009, "How does visual thinking work in the mind of a person with autism? A personal account." The following afternoon, Chuck pointed me to an autism conference, where Grandin happened to be the keynote speaker - at the Oshman JCC of all places, a t...more
Jafar
One of the chapters of Oliver Sacks’s An Anthropologist on Mars was about Temple Grandin – an autistic animal scientist. As a matter of fact, that book was named after her. During a conversation with Sacks, Grandin mentions that she feels like she’s an anthropologist on Mars: with her brain not having the innate ability of understanding other people’s emotions and motives and the intricacies of social interactions, she constantly feels like she’s in an alien territory.

This book is Grandin’s aut...more
Teresa Foote
I really enjoyed the HBO Movie, Temple Grandin, so when I had to choose a book to write about for my Abnormal Psych class, I decided to read her autobiography. Temple is just such a special and unique person, and her determination against all odds is really inspirational for anyone –autistic or not. She defies all expectations! A great and fascinating read for anyone who is interested in autism and anyone who knows or works with individuals diagnosed with autism....more
Jennybug
This is not a book that I ever would have picked up to read, had a friend of mine not suggested it to me. I really liked this book it was very interesting, informational, and sometimes disturbing. Not only is Temple an amazing person, but her mother's love for her, and desire to help her achieve her goals is just remarkable.
"Temple Grandin's triumph over autism affects us all-it is reaffirmed that the human spirit can overcome and even extract benefits from our extreme dysfunction's. It is a b...more
Liz
I am reading this book for a Developmental Variations grad school course and already I'm blown away. It is the autobiographical story of a functioning autistic woman (she would call herself "recovered autistic" but I still notice some qualities of autism seep out in her writing). Regardless of what you label her, she is a successful woman who overcame her disabilities characterised by intense nerve attacks and tantrums, hitting as the only form of communication with peers, and deplorable school...more
Kristi
Feb 18, 2008 Kristi rated it 4 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: teachers, parents, those with autism
Shelves: educational
I really learned a lot from the point of view in this book. I didn't read her earlier versions, but still appreciated the updates that were included as she learned more about herself and autism as a whole. This book and Born on a Blue Day (by Daniel Tammet) have been more helpful to my understanding of autism in its various forms than the many books I have received that are intended for teachers. I now think I can go back to those other books and their tips and advice will mean more to me now th...more
Amy
This was a very intresting read.
I learned who Temple Grandin is, a few years ago, and have been interested in her story for that long. She was diagnosed as Autistic when she was a child, and spent a lifetime dealing with her limitations from that.
It's exciting and awe inspiring to read the things she has overcome, and her adult analization of her behavior as a child. Also the things she thinks would have or might have helped her then. Still as she grew up, she improved herself. She overcame her...more
Gerry Huntman
For many reasons this is a very good book. As an autobiography of a truly amazing individual, this certainly excels, and for a book that allows the reader to get a glimpse of what it is like to be autistic (or Asperger's), it is invaluable. On the latter value, it certainly has special meaning for me as my daughter has Asperger's - and consequently it adds to my understanding of my daughter's needs, and Grandin's life gives me hope for my little one.

Technically, the book is written in a simple s...more
Eric
Beautiful memoir of the life of an autistic woman who worked through her developmental disorder to become a world renown animal behavior specialist. Filled with wonderful stories this book should be read by all who have compassion for others and the desire to grow within themselves.
Leyna Lavinthal
I am currently reading this book for school and I would recommend it to anyone, especially if you are interested in the VERY mysterious world of the Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Temple Grandin is a woman with Autism (very high functioning) and has a MS and PhD in Animal Science. She is an expert and pioneer in the design and construction of livestock handling facilities. She relates her reality as someone with Autism to what cattle must feel through inhumane treatment. This book is about her childh...more
Kellyanne Lynch
This book provides a great deal of insight into autism - especially Temple Grandin's personal experience. Her unique way of looking at the world is inspiring.
L8blmr
There is some controversy as to whether or not someone can "recover" from autism, but this author is a good example in favor of that concept. This book details mostly her early years and some realizations she arrived at, independent of doctors and psychologists, to improve her own condition. I read this book with my son, who is a high-functioning autistic, and now old enough (17) to appreciate, and even recognize himself and some of his characteristics in the telling of her own story. What she s...more
Anna
Apr 17, 2012 Anna rated it 3 of 5 stars
Recommended to Anna by: Julia
Have to admit that I was a little disappointed by this book. Don't get me wrong, it's an amazing and uplifting story, but I had gone in thinking that it would be more in-depth than it turned out to be. Not sure how I thought that was going to happen since it was a first-person story. Each chapter takes a section of Temple Grandin's life and explains what she learned and some of her experiences. It doesn't go much into her changes to the cattle chutes and changes that she's been the cause of in t...more
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 90 91 next »
topics  posts  views  last activity   
Autism 1 10 Feb 03, 2008 04:09AM  
  • Thorn in My Pocket: Temple Grandin's Mother Tells the Family Story
  • Somebody Somewhere: Breaking Free from the World of Autism
  • Pretending to Be Normal: Living with Asperger's Syndrome
  • There's a Boy in Here: Emerging from the Bonds of Autism
  • How Can I Talk If My Lips Don't Move?: Inside My Autistic Mind
  • Reasonable People
  • Songs of the Gorilla Nation: My Journey Through Autism
  • Not Even Wrong: Adventures in Autism
  • Freaks, Geeks & Asperger Syndrome: A User Guide to Adolescence
  • Send in the Idiots: Stories from the Other Side of Autism
  • Asperger's and Girls
  • Let Me Hear Your Voice: A Family's Triumph over Autism
  • Unstrange Minds: Remapping the World of Autism
  • Mozart and the Whale: An Asperger's Love Story
  • George and Sam
  • Ten Things Every Child with Autism Wishes You Knew
  • Autism Spectrum Disorders: The Complete Guide to Understanding Autism, Asperger's Syndrome, Pervasive Developmental Disorder, and Other ASDs
  • All Cats Have Asperger's Syndrome
1567
Temple Grandin, Ph.D., didn't talk until she was three and a half years old, communicating her frustration instead by screaming, peeping, and humming. In 1950, she was diagnosed with autism and her parents were told she should be institutionalized. She tells her story of "groping her way from the far side of darkness" in her book Emergence: Labeled Autistic, a book which stunned the world because,...more
More about Temple Grandin...
Thinking in Pictures: My Life with Autism Animals in Translation: Using the Mysteries of Autism to Decode Animal Behavior Animals Make Us Human: Creating the Best Life for Animals The Autistic Brain: Thinking Across the Spectrum The Way I See It: A Personal Look at Autism & Asperger's

Share This Book