Catullus (Oxford Readings in Classical Studies)
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Catullus (Oxford Readings in Classical Studies)

4.33 of 5 stars 4.33  ·  rating details  ·  6 ratings  ·  1 review
Oxford Readings in Catullus is a collection of articles that represent a sampling of the most interesting and important work on Catullus from around 1950 to 2000, together with three very short pieces from the Renaissance. The readings, selected for their intrinsic interest and importance, are intended to be thought-provoking (and in some cases provocative) and to challeng...more
Paperback, 606 pages
Published December 1st 2007 by Oxford University Press, USA (first published September 13th 2007)
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Daniel
Dec 08, 2007 Daniel rated it 5 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: Everyone
This is my favorite poet. He has a satirical wit and a serene flow of thought. I say, he is the greatest poet. To be followed by Horace, Terence and etc...
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Gaius Valerius Catullus (ca. 84 BC – ca. 54 BC) was a Roman poet of the 1st century BC. His surviving works are still read widely, and continue to influence poetry and other forms of art. Catullus invented the "angry love poem."
More about Catullus...
The Complete Poems The Student's Catullus Catullus. Tibullus. Pervigilium Veneris Catullus Writing Passion: A Catullus Reader

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