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God in the Wasteland: The Reality of Truth in a World of Fading Dreams

4.21  ·  Rating Details ·  187 Ratings  ·  24 Reviews
In this sequel to the widely praised No Place for Truth, David Wells calls for the restoration of the church based on a fresh encounter with the transcendent God. By looking anew at the way God's transcendence and immanence have been taken captive by modern appetites, Wells argues convincingly for a reform of the evangelical world.
Paperback, 288 pages
Published October 5th 1995 by William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company (first published July 1st 1994)
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William Dicks
The five books by Wells are a must read for every Christian today. They show the theological and moral bankruptcy of the modern church and calls for a theological reformation.

The books are:
1. No Place for Truth or Whatever Happened to Evangelical Theology?
2. God in the Wasteland: The Reality of truth in a World of Fading Dreams
3. Losing our Virtue: Why the Church Must Recover its Moral Vision
4. Above All Earthly Pow'rs: Christ in a Postmodern World
5. The Courage to be Protestant: Truth-lovers, M
...more
David Campton
Oct 31, 2012 David Campton rated it liked it
Shelves: general-theology
This was written nearly 20 years ago, and the subsequent trajectory of the evangelical wing of the church shows that it wasn't widely enough read. Throughout the book I found myself agreeing with the author and being frustrated by him in roughly equal measures... Dealing with the frustrations first there are times where it simply reads like a "the church just isn't what it was" rejection of the contemporary in favour of some Utopian yesteryear, but this is an issue of tone rather than substance, ...more
John
Jan 10, 2012 John rated it really liked it
Shelves: 2012
This is Wells' followup to "No Place For Truth." It spends the first third of the book summarizing and expanding on his thesis that modernity has almost thoroughly infected the evangelical church and the ramifications of such syncretism (my word). He then goes on to show the path out of the confusion, essentially stating that modernity is just a contemporary form of worldiness. He then argues theologically for the restoration of pure Christian doctrine, the centrality of theology in the life of ...more
Thomas
Apr 05, 2012 Thomas rated it it was amazing
As the twenty year anniversary of No Place for Truth approaches, I am slowly re-reading David Wells monumental series. Not only has it aged well, but it seems more trenchant in its critique, more prophetic in its call, than it did when first published. This volume, #2 in the series, builds on the first work and its treatment of modernity within the church, but exceeds it in constructive capacity. The final chapter, with its clear call to a counter-cultural existence in the world, is worthy of re ...more
Todd Wilhelm
Sep 07, 2016 Todd Wilhelm rated it it was amazing
A great read. Author David F. Wells is a precise critic of what is wrong with American evangelicalism and what needs to be done to right the ship.

"Moreover, when God becomes weightless, as I believe he is so often today, we lose the doctrinal signals that might otherwise warn us that some profound change has taken place - the sorts of signals that once warned of the threat of heresy. Too often in Our Time, there is only peace and quiet. The traditional doctrine of God remains entirely intact whi
...more
Lee Button
Aug 25, 2015 Lee Button rated it it was amazing
I agree wholeheartedly with the publisher's summary. "In this sequel to the widely praised No Place for Truth, David Wells calls for the restoration of the church based on a fresh encounter with the transcendent God. By looking anew at the way God's transcendence and immanence have been taken captive by modern appetites, Wells argues convincingly for a reform of the evangelical world." Wells' analysis is so current it is hard to believe the book was written 20 years ago. It turns out he was prop ...more
Debi
Feb 16, 2015 Debi rated it really liked it
Shelves: library
"We have turned to a God that we can use rather than to a God we must obey; we have turned to a God who will fulfill our needs rather than to a God before whom we must surrender our rights to ourselves. He is a God for us, for our satisfaction - not because we have learned to think of him in this way through Christ but because we have learned to think of him this way through the marketplace. In the marketplace, everything is for us, for our pleasure, for our satisfaction, and we have come to ass ...more
Peter Coleman
In the wasteland of a theologically desolate church that has shifted its focus from traditional doctrines toward the emphases of modernism, David Wells (Th.M. Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, Ph.D. Manchester University) seeks to identify the current state of the church. Furthermore, he wants to give a solution to reclaim the strength of the church, freeing it from the distractions that have come upon it. This solution, he feels, will come by the church returning to a depth in its theologica ...more
Richard Minor
Jan 05, 2016 Richard Minor rated it it was amazing
This book is over 20 years old and because of his tremednous accuracy it has stood the test of time. Wells does an excellent job of critiquing modernity and postmodernity and how it has crept into churches. I believe that even over 20 years removed from the writing that this is an excellent resource for Christian leaders to read and think through.
Andy Thaxton
Feb 17, 2015 Andy Thaxton rated it it was amazing
Excellent. Written in 1994, but amazing to see how many of Wells' thoughts have played out over the last 20 years.
Justin
Mar 28, 2014 Justin rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A bit dated, but really challenging in its God-centeredness.
John Rabe
Apr 11, 2008 John Rabe rated it really liked it
The second of Wells' four volume trilogy. (Yeah, yeah, I know, four volumes does not a trilogy make.) All four volumes are excellent and necessary. I've realized something, however. While there is no doubt a difference between each of the four books--i.e. I'm sure he's laying out a different thesis in each one--I realize I can't really tell them apart. They're all good, but they all seem to be explications of the same thing.

Nonetheless, it's a message we desperately need to hear in this day and
...more
Timothy Bertolet
Aug 01, 2011 Timothy Bertolet rated it really liked it
This is a great book looking at how evangelicalism has shifted from its roots. It shows how the evangelical view of God is shallow and lacking. It points to significant compromises within evangelical life and thought. Some of the statistics are a bit dated (1993) nevertheless they ring true. Indeed evangelicalism has fallen further into the morass that Wells exposed. This book is a great reflection on the need to recover the doctrine of God in the church today.
Brian Reagan
Jul 28, 2011 Brian Reagan rated it it was ok
An excellent book for telling the reader everything that is wrong. Very little in this book is helpful, and over 85% of it is like an infomercial. The book excels in being stilted academically, and so it is easy to get lost in thinking that Wells says anything that is genuinely helpful. My only regret is that I actually read the book instead of just skimming it.
Jennifer
Feb 22, 2013 Jennifer rated it really liked it
A frank examination of the evangelical church and its submersion into modern culture, abandoning the doctrines of God's transcendent holiness and man's original sin in favor of a radically individualistic view of God as our personal assistant.
Pj Berner
Jan 04, 2011 Pj Berner rated it really liked it
Shelves: theology
Great treatment of the wake of modernism and its impact on the Church. Although it was written in 1994 its thesis and content is quite relevant today. Good read.
Wes Hodges
Jun 27, 2009 Wes Hodges rated it it was amazing
Book 2 of a 4 part series - a classic. The idea of God being belived but of no real cvonsequence to those who believe is powerful.
Matt
Nov 17, 2009 Matt rated it liked it
Pessimistic about modern American evangelicalism; optimistic about Reformation evangelicalism.
Brian
Mar 02, 2012 Brian rated it it was amazing
Shelves: theology, sociology
This is the second (and best, IMO) of Wells' quintology on theology in the postmodern world.
Jeff
Aug 29, 2010 Jeff marked it as to-read
Recommended by David McCullough
Montag
Mar 25, 2013 Montag rated it it was amazing
Read. Be disturbed. Act.
Daniel Alvers
Jul 27, 2011 Daniel Alvers rated it it was amazing
Very good book!
Douglas Wilson
Feb 23, 2009 Douglas Wilson rated it really liked it
Quite good.
Jonam
Jonam marked it as to-read
Sep 13, 2016
Alisa Wilhelm
Alisa Wilhelm marked it as to-read
Sep 07, 2016
charissa.clvgs
charissa.clvgs marked it as to-read
Sep 01, 2016
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BookDB marked it as to-read
Aug 27, 2016
Terry
Terry marked it as to-read
Aug 23, 2016
Danny Foulkes
Danny Foulkes marked it as to-read
Aug 17, 2016
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David F. Wells (PhD, University of Manchester) is the Distinguished Senior Research Professor at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary.

In addition to serving as academic dean of its Charlotte campus, Wells has also been a member of the Lausanne Committee for World Evangelization and is involved in ministry in Africa.

He is the author of numerous articles and books, including a series that was initi
...more
More about David F. Wells...

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