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Without Guilt and Justice: From Decidophobia to Autonomy
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Without Guilt and Justice: From Decidophobia to Autonomy

4.34  ·  Rating Details ·  50 Ratings  ·  8 Reviews
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fortunecake
Jun 30, 2016 fortunecake rated it it was amazing
This book really is an eye opener. Kind of how I feel with facts to back why I feel that way. Why has life, society, people become so numb and drone-like, complacent with their 9 to 5's ... no spontaneity etc. etc.

There is so much rich content to pick and choose from, but here are a few excerpts:

"Parents, teachers and societies find children much easier to live with if they can be made predictable and less spontaneous and original. Society nurtures decidophobia and makes people more, not less, a
...more
Timothy
Apr 14, 2012 Timothy rated it it was amazing
This is one of those books I read in my late teens. It concisely expressed much of my own thinking at the time. It laid down a gauntlet, so to speak, offered me a challenge. What is justice? Does it have any meaning?

I think it does, and I think Kaufmann is wrong here, wrong especially in not looking at justice as one virtue among many that gained its meaning as a means to reduce conflict in a world where conflict was king, but co-operation always possible.

These are the ideas I grappled with befo
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Socraticgadfly
Kaufmann, Nietzsche's foremost expositor, and best English translator, brings his own considerable philosophical skills to play in this volume.

It is true that some of his specific references, such as the "alienation" of mid-20th century psychology, or his riffs on Solzhenitysn, may be dated.

But his core arguments certainly are not.

Kaufmann spends a fair amount of time turning a withering moral eye to retributive justice, and another withering logical and existential eye to the idea of proportion
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Les
Nov 12, 2016 Les rated it it was amazing
Find me a better moral philosophy, and I'll stop advocating for this one. Until then, this the best moral system around. Written for laymen.
0spinboson
Jun 30, 2016 0spinboson rated it it was amazing
Very much a shame that this book seems to have been forgotten, though it doesn't surprise me, not least because it's a bit too abstract to function as a self-help book for people who are convinced by its premise. (For those who are, I would refer you to NVC, as developed by Marshall B. Rosenberg.) Will write a more substantial review later.
Bria
Nov 19, 2009 Bria rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I can't even express how absolutely on the dot this book is. Absolutely, amazingly right on, and dreadfully tragic that it practically doesn't exist anymore and you can't find it anywhere, even though it should be required reading. Even if, years from now, I decide that my gushing love and devotion to Kaufmann was childish and premature, and move on to better ideas, that would still be in line with its philosophy. 6 stars. 10 stars.
ayanami
Jun 18, 2016 ayanami is currently reading it
Shelves: non-fiction, 2016
Someone on a gifted adults blog says "Chapter 6 in particular talks about how we need to be alienated from society in order to be truly free. Since the average person lives their life passively, anyone who lives conscientiously will necessarily be alienated from the average person."
Brian Reinhart
Oct 15, 2013 Brian Reinhart rated it really liked it
Kaufmann is opposed to justice. The retributive kind and the "you deserve it" kind. It makes for an interesting, challenging book that you won't stop thinking about. I don't entirely agree, but I agree more than I wanted to.
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Walter Arnold Kaufmann was a German-American philosopher, translator, and poet. A prolific author, he wrote extensively on a broad range of subjects, such as authenticity and death, moral philosophy and existentialism, theism and atheism, Christianity and Judaism, as well as philosophy and literature. He served for over 30 years as a Professor at Princeton University.

He is renowned as a scholar an
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“The Golden Rule is intolerable; if millions did to others whatever they wished others to do to them, few would be safe from molestation. The Golden Rule shows anything but moral genius, and the claim by which it is followed in the Sermon on the Mount -- 'this is the Law and the Prophets' -- makes little sense.” 6 likes
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