All The Myriad Ways
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All The Myriad Ways

3.99 of 5 stars 3.99  ·  rating details  ·  1,659 ratings  ·  20 reviews
An early collection of short works. Includes: All the Myriad Ways (1968); Passerby (1969); For a Foggy Night (1968); Wait It Out [Known Space] (1968); The Jigsaw Man [Known Space] (1967); Not Long Before the End (1969); Unfinished Story No. 1 (1970); Unfinished Story No. 2 (1971); Man of Steel, Woman of Kleenex (essay, 1969); Exercise in Speculation: The Theory and Practic...more
Mass Market Paperback, 181 pages
Published June 1971 by Del Ray (first published 1971)
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Patricia
Aug 01, 2007 Patricia rated it 3 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: Idea-hunters, science-fiction fans
"All the Myriad Ways" is pretty ancient, by modern science fiction standards, but it's also more than that. It's one of Niven's collections of mixed fiction and commentary, science explanation, and basically "wild ideas" that he has either come up with or is happy to pass along to others. (Had string theory been around when it was written, I feel sure Niven would have discussed it.)

I chose this one to review because it's the one I can find my copy of and remember what's in it. But use it as a ge...more
Katie
The title story is nice, and Inconstant Moon is always a joy. There's a segment of nonfiction in the middle that drags horribly -- Niven has poor command of density for nonfic.
Chris
I liked several of the stories in this book, but I think it was a mistake to throw three non-fiction essays in the middle. They make it pretty obvious that the stories are all about the clever idea and not about anything else.

There are some clever ideas here. My favorite story was "What Can You Say About Chocolate Covered Manhole Covers?," but I also liked the two extraplanetary stories, one set on Venus and one on Pluto. "Not Long Before the End" was a clever take on the death of magic. I didn'...more
Tracey
One drawback of collecting an author's entire oeuvre (especially in the SF/F world) is the repetition of short stories in various and sundry anthologies. For example, while I'd never read this book, I had read most of its stories within other collections.

IMHO, Niven's talent really shines in his short stories; whether exploring the concepts of time travel, life on other planets, the slippery slope of organ transplantation, magic as a finite resource or Superman's sex life (really!).

While some...more
Bbrown
I only read the titular story, which was a standard piece of science fiction based on the multiverse theory. It was an okay yarn, though the idea was clearly of more importance to Niven than the characters or the story. The exploration of how people would react to the multiverse theory being proven true was trite.
Grant
Larry Niven has always been my favorite Sci Fi author. I got the chance to meet him, along with Jerry Pournelle's son, when working in the late 1990s. This book exemplifies his mastery of the craft, though old.

You can see shades of some of his longer books in this, and the development or a "known universe" set of stories. Other are, well let's just say creative. "Man of Steel, Woman of Kleenex" is an essay on whether Superman can mate with humans. The unfinished story is three paragraphs that s...more
Andreas
This short story and essay collection contains some of my favorite stories of all time. For example Becalmed in Hell is about a man and his machine partner exploring Venus. It has a very clever psychological twist. Inconstant Moon, which won the Hugo in 1972, is about a couple of people inferring a great disaster on the far side of the world. Epic stuff. Man of Steel, Woman of Kleenex is a hilarious essay about the problems Superman would have mating with the hypothetical woman “LL”. It may be o...more
Terry
Thanks to my older brother, I developed a taste for Larry Niven shortly after exhausting my middle school library's collection of Hienlien. This is a particular favorite for the essay "Man of Steel, Woman of Kleenex, or Why Superman Can't Get a Date," as well as the one on teleportation. They still hold up.
John
Some stories and some essays, all on Niven's characteristic hard-science perspective. Includes an essay on time travel and the classic consideration of Superman and Lois Lane's love life, "Man of Steel, Woman of Kleenex". I read this with great enthusiasm thirty years ago, and, surprise! found it a bit dated.
Mike
Larry Niven is truly at his best with short fiction, and though I had read a couple of these stories in other anthologies this was a very good book -- I particularly liked some of the closing stories ("Inconstant Moon" and "What Can You Say About Chocolate Manhole Covers?").
Jack
Ahhhh... these short stories were great! If you read NOTHING else out of this book of short stories, you MUST read "Man of Steel, Woman of Kleenex"... you'll never look at Clark Kent, Lois Lane, Supergirl and Superman the same way (at least, not without laughing)
Emu
This book would have been more fun if it hadn't contained like 40% recycled material from other Niven collections. What, did you think I wasn't going to read those other collections? Weak. But the new stuff was great as usual.
Erik Graff
Nov 07, 2011 Erik Graff rated it 3 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: sf fans
Recommended to Erik by: no one
Shelves: sf
The Superman/Lois Lane "essay" is quite risque and very funny--not at all typical of my mental picture of this hard-science SF writer.
Alex
Larry Niven has his moments of quality. This book isn't really one of them. But Inconstant Moon is still a fine story.
Scythan
This was great! There were a few stories that I recall reading elsewhere, though... maybe from another collection?
Emily Ellis
The classic essay "Man of steel, Woman of Kleenex" alone is worth the price of admission
Jeremy
A few brilliant short stories and a few cute premises for essays. He could use an editor.
Christopher
Sciency science fiction short stories from about 1970 by the great Larry Niven.
Danielle
Dec 29, 2008 Danielle marked it as to-read
recommended to me despite not liking ringworld
bluetyson
All the Myriad Ways by Larry Niven (1985)
Dv
Dv marked it as to-read
Jul 20, 2014
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Laurence van Cott Niven's best known work is Ringworld (Ringworld, #1) (1970), which received the Hugo, Locus, Ditmar, and Nebula awards. His work is primarily hard science fiction, using big science concepts and theoretical physics. The creation of thoroughly worked-out alien species, which are very different from humans both physically and mentally, is recognized as one of Niven's main strengths...more
More about Larry Niven...
Ringworld (Ringworld, #1) The Mote in God's Eye (Moties, #1) Lucifer's Hammer The Ringworld Engineers (Ringworld, #2) Footfall

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