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Bottled Up: How the Way We Feed Babies Has Come to Define Motherhood, and Why It Shouldn't

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4.26  ·  Rating Details ·  23 Ratings  ·  1 Review
As the subject of a popular web reality series, Suzanne Barston and her husband Steve became a romantic, ethereal model for new parenthood. Called "A Parent is Born," the program’s tagline was "The journey to parenthood . . . from pregnancy to delivery and beyond." Barston valiantly surmounted the problems of pregnancy and delivery. It was the "beyond" that threw her for a ...more
Kindle Edition, 217 pages
Published October 18th 2012 by University of California Press
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Michelle
Sep 22, 2014 Michelle rated it it was amazing
Brilliant book. It doesn't matter if you're breastfeeding or bottle feeding or unsure of which way to go, this book speaks with simple honesty and asks some very important questions.
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Suzanne Barston is the former Editor-in-Chief of Los Angeles Family Magazine, and a freelance writer specializing in parenting, women’s interest, and science/health topics. She is the author of Bottled Up: How the Way We Feed Babies Has Come to Define Motherhood, and Why It Shouldn’t and blogs as her alter ego, the "Fearless Formula Feeder".
Barston began writing about infant feeding issues after s
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“What if, rather than asking women to bear the burden of responsibility for our nation’s health and intelligence, governments invested money in research for better formulas that can improve health? If what we feed our babies in the first year really has that much of an impact on lifelong health, this should be a priority. Because in reality, not all babies are going to be able to be breastfed, as long as we want to live in a world where women have the freedom to decide how to use their bodies; whether to work or stay home; whether to be a primary caregiver or not. In reality, there are going to be children raised by single dads; there are going to be children raised by grandparents; there are going to be children who are adopted by parents who aren’t able to induce lactation; there are going to be children whose mothers don’t produce enough milk, or who are on drugs not compatible with breastfeeding. Rather than demanding that every mother should be able to—should want to—breastfeed, we should be demanding better research, better resources, better options. We should be demanding better.” 1 likes
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