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A Common Life: Four Generations of American Literary Friendships and Influence
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A Common Life: Four Generations of American Literary Friendships and Influence

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really liked it 4.0  ·  Rating Details ·  9 Ratings  ·  1 Review
In this splendid group portrait, David Laskin tells the stories of four friendships that helped to define the course of American literature: Nathaniel Hawthorne and Herman Melville, Henry James and Edith Wharton, Katherine Anne Porter and Eudora Welty, Elizabeth Bishop and Robert Lowell. Written with uncommon grace and insight, A Common Life is a fascinating narrative of t ...more
Paperback, 464 pages
Published September 6th 2007 by Simon & Schuster (first published 1994)
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James Murphy
Jan 16, 2012 James Murphy rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Laskin has written a book of criticism and biography centered around 4 important friendships: Herman Melville and Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edith Wharton and Henry James, Eudora Welty and Katherine Anne Porter, Robert Lowell and Elizabeth Bishop. That these friendships have influence upon the individuals of each pair there's no doubt. Perhaps this is most famously demonstrated in Melville's changing the elemental character of Ahab after he met the brooding, introspective Hawthorne, turning Moby-Dick ...more
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92055
Born in Brooklyn and raised in Great Neck, New York, I grew up hearing stories that my immigrant Jewish grandparents told about the “old country” (Russia) that they left at the turn of the last century. When I was a teenager, my mother’s parents began making yearly trips to visit our relatives in Israel, and stories about the Israeli family sifted down to me as well. What I never heard growing up ...more
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