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The Ship Who Sang (Brainship, #1)
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The Ship Who Sang (Brainship #1)

3.96 of 5 stars 3.96  ·  rating details  ·  14,815 ratings  ·  236 reviews
Helva had been born human, but only her brain had been saved and implanted into the titanium body of an intergalactic scout ship. But first she had to choose a human partner, to soar with her through the daring adventures and exhilarating escapades in space.
Paperback, 256 pages
Published December 12th 1985 by Del Rey (first published 1969)
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Ender's Game by Orson Scott CardDune by Frank Herbert1984 by George OrwellFahrenheit 451 by Ray BradburyBrave New World by Aldous Huxley
Best Science Fiction & Fantasy Books
146th out of 4,330 books — 15,752 voters
Old Man's War by John ScalziStarship Troopers by Robert A. HeinleinPandora's Star by Peter F. HamiltonRevelation Space by Alastair ReynoldsOn Basilisk Station by David Weber
Excellent Space Opera
23rd out of 273 books — 1,421 voters


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Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 3,000)
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Aunt Edie
It was Thanksgiving, I was out of town, had just gotten ready to head out for dinner when I heard that Anne McCaffrey had passed. It hit me like a punch in the gut. I couldn't quite shake it all evening. What was going on? Sure, I've read her books but she has never been on a list of favorite authors, why was I so affected? I knew L'Engle would be a tough one for me. Butler was just so unexpected. Le Guin is going to turn me into a wreck. But McCaffrey? I've never listed her as an influence or p ...more
Freya
As with it seems all Anne McCaffrey's books I was hooked and found it very difficult to put down - made worse by the fact that it's quite easy to hold, being so small, at the dinner table...

The Ship Who Sang is about Helva who's body is disfigured and fairly unusable from birth, however her mind being unaffected she is raised to be a shell-person and become a brain ship. I really love the ideas of brain ships, the extra things they are capable of despite lacking the mobility of their human body,
...more
Michael
You could structure an entire college course around the ethical questions raised in this book. Is it ethically justified to take children with sound minds but no control of their bodies and then hook them up to galaxy class spaceships to work off the medical expense through government contracts? What ethics are involved for such a ship in making choices about their missions and their destiny? Would other humans want to compete for such an honor, or would it still be a secondary existence to livi ...more
Jim
I think I read this before I read her Pern series, at least about the same time in the early 1970's. I was really impressed by her take on a cyborg. It was different than anything I'd read before. She looked at it with a lot of humanity. A perennial favorite of mine.
Mark Johansen
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Alex Satrapa
Anne Mccaffrey was a prolific writer of Science Fantasy. The first Anne Mccaffrey book I read was this one, "The Ship Who Sang." Anne's writing (all through the books I have read from Dragonriders, Petaybee and Crystal Singer) has always struck me as optimistic, romantic, and not at all concerned about physics. If you are a hard science fiction fan (i.e.: you love Asimov and Arthur C Clarke) you might be left feeling cheated by The Ship Who Sang: there are gaping plot holes on just about every p ...more
Raj
Helva has been wrapped in a titanium 'shell' since birth, a shell that protects and nurtures her, as her own body is broken and useless. Inserted into a spaceship that becomes her body, she travels the stars with her partnered 'brawn', working for the Central Worlds government as a medical ship, trying to pay off the debt she incurred for her upbringing and spaceship body. But Helva is unique amongst Brainships, she is the ship who sings.

This book brings together several short stories about Helv
...more
Helen
This was the first Anne McCaffrey book I read, and I fell in love with it.
I love singing, which attracted me to the title, and I was entranced by the idea that Helva had been born with severe physical disabilities but was mentally bright, so her brain was wired up to control spaceship parts rather than limbs, and to access computer data storage as well as what is in her brain.
But she still has human needs, and develops this extraordinary talent to sing as a hobby and a way of engaging her feeli
...more
Angus Mcfarlane
The ship who sang is a historical science fiction piece that comprises short vignettes which exercise both technological speculation and contemporary commentary. I liked the angle on time and space travel that is taken: interstellar travel is routine, but apart from the very long times needed to get to faraway places, the days weeks or years needed for the trips taken in the various stories is never mentioned. Ambiguity is also retained throughout regarding the trustworthiness of the central wor ...more
Valerie
I have a collection of short stories by McCaffrey, but I realized when I got it down to reread and review it that one was a sequel to this book. So I searched around until I found a copy, which took longer than I expected.

First, the table of contents:

The Ship Who Sang
The Ship Who Mourned
The Ship Who Killed
Dramatic Mission
The Partnered Ship.

The book, in other words, is a collection of short stories. McCaffrey did write novels, but this isn't one. But since all the stories at least involve the 'br
...more
Sharon Malcolm
A little too much science in my science fiction and my brain skims and my interest wanes. This was almost more a series of disconnected short stories in the life of our protagonist rather than a cohesive novel. Good stories, though. And I did find the mills and boon type crisis ending quite amusing!
Amelia
Aug 11, 2014 Amelia rated it 3 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to Amelia by: Valerie
Shelves: i-read-for-free
Oh the awkward moment when you don't like someone's favourite book they've loaned you. Admittedly it would be somewhat inaccurate to say I didn't like it... I liked it fine - for the most part - until page 304. This is where we get to Anne McCaffrey's views on love and sex which are... dated, shall we say. I thought, as Valerie raved about this book, that I wouldn't be able to identify with Helva as a human being. That a spaceship experiencing emotions would be just too much for my sci-fi-is-ok- ...more
Textor Texel
Вначале сделаю оговорочку – я никогда не читал фантастику/фэнтези и не держал в руках других произведений Энн Маккефри, оттого возможно мой отзыв покажется несколько неясным и неумелым ввиду отсутствия опыта и «хваткости» читающих глаз.

Обман – это то, что мы создаем, а вовсе не то, во что верим.


Итак, произведение описывает нам будущее, век удивительных земных технологий, целиком и полностью направленных на продление жизни, чего бы это ни стоило. Главная героиня, Хельва, должна была погибнуть из-
...more
Doreen
First off, I'm late to the Anne McCaffrey oeuvre. Someone gave me a stack of her books, and I thought I'd start with Dragonflight, for which she's best known. Bad idea, as that is a novel of extremely unlikeable people who do cruel things to one another (also, the "romance" was entirely forced and grossed me out.)

The Ship Who Sang has characters that it's much easier to root for, and the scientific ideas are progressive and unique. But. Helva is exceedingly naive for someone of her experience. S
...more
Christine Ricci
At first I was a little disappointed because I felt I needed more evidence of the four years or so that Helva spent with her love to deserve such a grieving process. However, I found that I eventually, felt there was no need. The relationships throughout the novel are quite compelling and speak to the many types of relationships I see in my life. The novel seems to be an expansion of the idea that everyone you know, was put into your life for a reason. You know them for the time it was important ...more
Louise Armstrong
I remember totally enjoying this book when I was a teenager, and it holds up pretty well. What impressed me were her alien Corviki. They express themselves in human words and concepts (how could it be else?) BUT given a neat twist so they sound alien.

"'My energy group is excited to experience the total pressure dominances of these envelopes,' the Manager replied, emanating the lavender-purples Helga equated with pleasure in Corviki."

Aliens are created a bit lazily sometimes - was it James Blish
...more
Mary-Beth
Even my father was able to appreciate the ingenuity of the concept behind this series. Physically disabled children are trained so that they can pilot spaceships with their minds. These ships partner telepathically with "brawns," basically people who act as the ships hands and whatnot, a kind of secondary captain.

I bet you can guess how the romance plays out, but it's a bit fun because if you're like me and enjoy all the tension that happens before romances are a done deal, well, these characte
...more
Janine Noble
A somewhat disjointed science fiction, space adventure with a good start and a strong finish.

In this, the first book in the Brain and Brawn Ships series, we are introduced to the concept of newborn babies with healthy minds but malformed bodies who are encapsulated in a metal shell so that they are able to live a “rewarding, rich and unusual life,” in certain specialized professions, such as the ‘brain’ of a scout ship.

One such brainship is Helva, whose adventures we follow during the course of
...more
Bill Tillman
I am currently reading Anne McCaffrey books. This is one of the first award winning short stories. Helva is a ship's brain she was born with a terribly deformed body and the parents were given the option of having her trained as a spaceship brain rather than die in a few weeks. In the course of her training she interacted with a group of concerned citizens and was told she had a singing voice. A touching look at living an alternative life. Great short read.
Nose in a book (Kate)
This really felt like it had an original but somehow classic set-up. In a future with commonplace space travel and human settlements on other planets, science has found a fascinating way to help children born with certain birth defects. Those who are born with a body that is useless but a brain that is high-functioning are trained to become encapsulated brains, plugged into one of the Federation of Planets’ specially designed shells, such as a space ship, fully controlling it in every way. Each ...more
Erik Graff
Jul 30, 2009 Erik Graff rated it 3 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: sf fans
Recommended to Erik by: a girl in seminary
Shelves: sf
After the first Pern story I got pretty sick of Anne McCaffrey, but this book, written before the dragon stuff and recommended by a girl who lived across the hall from me in Hastings Hall at UTS, was actually rather moving. I guess, if the Kirkus review is to be credited, I must be an adolescent girl.
Elaine Greory
As is usual with Ms. McCaffrey's books, "The Ship Who Sang" was very well-written, both technically and creatively. Still, the premise of the story bothered me, especially the idea of euthanising "deformed" or "defective" children so that their brains might be used as organic computers.

Intellectually, I know the she's just telling a story and probably did not condone such practices, but the concept is disturbing. There are many, many people who are disabled from birth who do just fine, thank you
...more
Barbara
Jan 29, 2014 Barbara rated it 3 of 5 stars
Shelves: sf
If I was reading this for the first time I'd only give it 2 stars but it gets 3 from me for sentimental reasons as I loved it when I first read it as a teenager.

It was an interesting experience reading it again after so long. It would be considered wildly political incorrect if it was written today. It opens with parents of the severely physically disabled baby, Helva, given the choice of euthanasia or having her become a shell-person/cyborg. This didn't bother me the first time I read it, and d
...more
Lisa (Harmonybites)
Apr 21, 2010 Lisa (Harmonybites) rated it 4 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: Everyone
McCaffrey's one of my favorite authors. She's best known for her Pern books, which starts with Dragonflight, and I'd certainly highly recommend those. So it is not faint praise to say I would rate this particular novel of hers as highly as any of her Pern books.

The Pern stories are often mistaken for fantasy, because they involve dragons, although they're really science fiction despite the trappings. The Ship Who Sang is more classical science fiction--could be even called space opera--but what
...more
Sam
This is a book I return to over and over again. I've lost count of the number of times I've read it. A collection of short stories interlink into what is effectively a novel, centred around Helva, the heroine of the title.

I suppose this could be best described as a science fiction romance. Set in, I presume, a future where humanity has expanded to colonise other planets, Helva is the human at the core of a Brainship. Severely disabled at birth, her only chance of survival is in a titanium shell.
...more
M. J.
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Kendra Merritt
Full Review: http://kendramerritt.com/the-universe...

This is going on my shelf permanently since the last story in the book, “The Partnered Ship” kept me from meeting a deadline. Anne McCaffrey has been one of my favorites since I read Dragonsong in 8th grade, and she continues to be a best-loved author to this day. But my Pern collection is just going to have to scoot over to make room for this one.

Helva was born with some staggering physical challenges. I couldn’t tell what her disabilities we
...more
Anna
Вау. Ух ты. Ничего себе. Любимая книга Capitalistka была поглощена меньше, чем за 24 часа. Днем во время переезда на новую стоянку я открыла ее, а утром следующего дня, во время возвращения домой, закрыла. Люблю, когда книги так сильно захватывают, что на некоторое время теряешь связь с реальностью, полностью оказываясь в мире происходящего.

Космическая фантастика для девушек высокого качества - так я могла бы кратко охарактеризовать книгу. Но это настолько сухое и плоское объяснение, которое нис
...more
Jason
I have never been much of a sci-fi reader. Actually, my only other dive into that end of the pool occurred last year when I listened to the unabridged version of Dune during a long-ass road trip. So, having girded my loins on the genre's 'bible', I picked this book up for the same reason that I listened to the other one: Many MANY people appeared to have a sincere and slightly unnatural love for it.

This book was just simply a great read and extraordinarily well-written. The plot lines in each c
...more
Brian Schiebout
The Ship Who Sang by Anne McCaffrey is the first book in the Ship Who series. The six stories which make up this book were originally individual stories but they combine to create a single whole which better tells the tale of the ship who sang than any of them do on their own. The ship who sang is Helva , a cyborg which is created when severely disabled babies are entombed in metal pillars and connected to outside sensors which can allow them to control ships and cities. Helva is unique in her e ...more
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26
Anne McCaffrey was born on April 1st, 1926, in Cambridge, Massachusetts, at 1:30 p.m., in the hour of the Sheep, year of the Fire Tiger, sun sign Aries with Taurus rising and Leo mid-heaven (which seems to suggest an early interest in the stars).

Her parents were George Herbert McCaffrey, BA, MA PhD (Harvard), Colonel USA Army (retired), and Anne Dorothy McElroy McCaffrey, estate agent. She had two
...more
More about Anne McCaffrey...
Dragonflight (Pern, #1) Dragonsong (Harper Hall, #1) The White Dragon (Pern, #3) Dragonsinger (Harper Hall, #2) Dragonquest (Pern, #2)

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