How Chipmunk Got His Stripes: A Tale of Bragging and Teasing
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How Chipmunk Got His Stripes: A Tale of Bragging and Teasing

4.03 of 5 stars 4.03  ·  rating details  ·  29 ratings  ·  14 reviews
When Bear and Brown Squirrel have a disagreement about whether Bear can stop the sun from rising, Brown Squirrel ends up with claw marks on his back and becomes Chipmunk, the striped one.
Hardcover, 32 pages
Published April 14th 2003 by Turtleback Books
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Megan
I'm reading this aloud tomorrow to help kick-off the culture unit for fables, folktales, fairy tales, and myths for Language Arts. Tomorrow's class is devoted to folktales and this is a fine example of a North American Native American folktale. Even though the illustrations are a bit juvenile, I think my class will like the story and it certainly demonstrates all of the elements of a folktale.
Jamie Davis
Bear believes he is the greatest of all the animals and brags that he is so great that he can command the sun. Chipmunk has a different view so the two animals wait through the night to see if the sun will not come up. They both bicker back and forth. When Chipmunk is right he goes too far with his "I told you so". Bear decides to take revenge.

This is a good story for children to decide on a story theme and follows many Native American tales in the porquoi vein.

The illustrations are a bit lacki...more
Cristen
The story itself was fine, but the illustrations really detracted from the tale. At one point the animals all come out to watch the sun rise, and a hawk is specifically named, but there is no hawk present.
Dalton Miller
This book is a great tale for young children.It will teach them life lessons and how Bragging and Teasing could get you in to trouble. It shows the kids how the little chpmunk knows more then other animails but is teasing them that they are not as smart. This got him in to trouble and made other feel bad.
Eden
When Bear said he could do anything, Brown Squirrel asked him if he could keep the sun from rising and Bear said he could. When the sun does rise and Brown Squirrel learns a lesson about bragging.

This is a good story about teaching it's not good to brag, or think that you know everything.
Rebecca Brandes
How did a chipmunk get his stripes? Children have the tendency to ask why, why, why? Well, here is a fun way to explain to children how a chipmunk got his stripes. Children will love to make their own par quoi after reading this one.
Kathy
A folklore/fable about teasing. Great read aloud book! Especially when the striped chipmunk is native to your state. (Very common on the Colorado plains and most students have seen one before).
Ada
Used this as part of my Celebrate with Stories program for our series on Porquoi tales. Great story to tell or read aloud because there are a lot of different characters you can do fun voices with.
Alicia Scully
The book presents a fable look at how a regular brown squirrel turned into a chipmunk. Warns against bragging and bullying in a cute way to help kids get more out of it.
Dana
I was surprised at how good this book was. The Native American folk tale comes to life in both the text and the accompanying pictures.
Katie Hauser
Chipmunk challenges the boasting bear and wins. But when he taunts bear he is taught his lesson.
Eloise
Fun read aloud that worked well with the 6-8-year-olds for summer reading.
Ashley
An excellent folk tale about how chipmunk got his stripes.
Bob
Bob added it
Jun 04, 2014
babyhippoface
babyhippoface marked it as to-read
Feb 05, 2014
Erin
Erin added it
Dec 02, 2013
Ashley
Ashley marked it as to-read
Dec 01, 2013
Linda
Linda added it
Oct 25, 2013
Alexa Dice
Alexa Dice marked it as to-read
Oct 01, 2013
Megan
Megan added it
Sep 09, 2013
Alicia
Alicia marked it as to-read
Jun 09, 2013
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