Debt of Honor (Jack Ryan, #7)
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Debt of Honor (Jack Ryan #7)

3.97 of 5 stars 3.97  ·  rating details  ·  25,959 ratings  ·  300 reviews
Razio Yamata is one of Japan's most influential industrialists, and part of a relatively small group of authority who wield tremendous authority in the Pacific Rim's economic powerhouse.

He has devised a plan to cripple the American greatness, humble the US military, and elevate Japan to a position of dominance on the world stage.

Yamata's motivation lies in his desire to...more
Paperback, 990 pages
Published August 1st 1995 by Berkley (first published January 1st 1994)
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The Bourne Identity by Robert LudlumTinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy by John le CarréThe Spy Who Came In from the Cold by John le CarréThe Hunt for Red October by Tom ClancyThe Day of the Jackal by Frederick Forsyth
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Community Reviews

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Stephen
5.5 to 6.0 stars. This is my favorite Tom Clancy book. I don't want to give away any spoilers but the scope of the plot and the multi-pronged attack on the U.S. was amazing. Add to that the superb way in which the good guys fight back and an "over the top" ending and you have a memorable piece of fiction by one of the masters of the genre.
Paul Cude
The very first Tom Clancy book I ever bought, and by mistake as well. (Through a book club in case you were wondering. I was too lazy to send it back) After reading this, I had to go back and get all of his previous books. Having reread this recently, I marvelled at the complexity of everything going on, and how wonderfully well it all comes together at the end. It's hard to fathom how the author can write in some much detail, with so much knowledge, combining it all in an intricate plot. Great...more
Wesley
Jan 21, 2010 Wesley added it
Debt of Honor, among other things, is the story of Jack Ryan and his role in a conflict between the Japan and the United States that eventually leads to war between the two countries. Personally, I found this book to be very boring because of the fact that it was overly long. Throughout the book, I saw multiple parts where the author, Tom Clancy could have just ended the book, but he kept going on and on. Eventually, I just found that he dragged out the events to the point where I was, instead o...more
Nick Black
A more enjoyable outing than The Sum of All Fears or the lamentable Without Remorse; Clancy managed here to get it up one last time following the CCCP's dissolution, and I've got to admit that one of my first thoughts on 2001-09-11 was "holy gawd some Montana nutcase has brought his Debt of Honor recreation society to a horrible climax". Everything fell apart in the followup effort Executive Orders, which was to close the door on my teenage fascination with Old Man Clancy.

One of the best essays...more
Curtiss
This is by far my favorite of Tom Clancy's Jack Ryan novels, in which Jack and the NSA 'discover' that Japan's business interests have coerced their government into launching a modern-day sneak attack on the US and get away with it almost without the US even being aware of it. Together with the usual supporting cast from the previous novels, Jack is able to restore the status-quo-ante by the end of the book, that is up to the surprise finish which leaves Jack 'in charge.'

My favorite scene is the...more
Will
SUBJECTIVE READER REVIEW FOLLOWS:

I've become a Clancy fan, and Debt of Honor--in its totality--may be one of the best novels ever written. I will quickly caveat that statement by saying that Clancy is one of the most prolific writers in history, as I had to ready 500 pages to get to the point where the book got really exciting. Then it was spellbinding. Now I sometimes think I'm a long writer, but my cursory review says this book is 390,000 words, or about five times the length of most commercia...more
Seth Benzell
Tom Clancy's novels decline pretty quickly in quality beyond The Hunt For Red October. The good guys become too invulnerable, the villains too mustache twirling, the thrills less thrilling.

This is the last good one. Rather than be confronted with a problem that can be solved through direct military action, the US must deal with asymmetric attacks on its economy, navy, and some allied islands. No essential US interest is at stake from the overt attacks, and the enemy claims to have a nuclear det...more
Trevor
This was by far my most favorite of the Jack Ryan series!

Uniquely, as I was enjoying the whole thing, I thought to myself that one would be hard pressed to enjoy it as much without the entire backstory of all the collective other Jack Ryan books, up to that point.

So, in light of all the others, this one stands on the mountaintop as a shining crown!
Dan
I've been making my way through the Jack Ryan universe since college reading one book every couple years. I hadn't read one in a long time so I was due. These books are bricks so it took me a while to get through this one.

This book is definitely a slow burn, but instead of the simmering coals of other slow burn books I've read, this is more of a candle, it is interesting the whole way through and never did I look ahead dreading how much I still had left. Clancy is great at weaving technical det...more
Ron
900 pages of waffle, very disappointing.
Victoria Moore
I don't usually read espionage novels but once I started reading Tom Clancy's "Debt of Honor" I felt ready for the challenge. Written in a lengthy format where a wide range of characters in the United States, Japan, Saipan and Russia struggled to exist in a world changed by war, technology and loss it was both detailed and intense. Central to all of the action, was the continuing saga of John (Jack) Patrick Ryan who impressed me immensely with his superior political skills. He handled himself s...more
Bruce Snell
Book number 8 in the Jack Ryan series by Tom Clancy. After a serious automobile accident kills four people, the US congress initiates trade restrictions with Japan - and that leads to war. A Japanese businessman, Razio Yamata, takes it upon himself to get even with America for all the differences they have had in several generations. Yamata plots a stock market crash devaluing the dollar, the hostile takeover of Saipan and the Mariana Islands, the sinking of two submarines, and the crippling of...more
Mike Edwards
Perhaps 1 star is a bit harsh; maybe I should give it 1.5 instead. Clancy remains a skilled writer, in terms of dialogue, character development, and the build-up of suspense. If you've gotten this far in the Jack Ryan series, Debt of Honor will be an easy and enjoyable read for you.

The problem is the plot. The gymnastics that Clancy needs to go through to set up a half-way plausible explanation for a war between the United States and Japan--not to mention a reason why Japan has half a chance aga...more
Jerome
I've heard it said that this book is too long. I don't see how it could be shortened without chopping out the political arc of the story. That would leave us with two powerful nations butting heads, and no real idea of how the conflict came about. Some writers might be content with that. Tom Clancy is not. He knows that you cannot begin to understand any event or action until you understand the forces responsible for its creation. How do nations plunge, leap, stumble, or blunder into war? Mr. Cl...more
Alec
Tom Clancy’s purpose for writing Debt of Honor is purely for thrilling entertainment. As always, his novels are bursting with detail and overflowing with suspense. In the book, many different institutions are introduced and explained. At several points in the novel, multiple pages are used to describe how the stock market works, how different people interact, and how Japanese bathhouses stay in business. This novel warns against the comfort of security via superiority. America became so powerfu...more
Curtiss
After what appears to be a pair of "accidents" during U.S. Naval manuevers, results in the crippling of one of America's front-line aircraft carriers and the loss of one of her SSN attack submarines, is followed by the melt-down of Wall Street's Stock Exchanges, Jack Ryan concludes that what has actually occurred is that Japan has launched another surprise attack against the U.S. to recover the Mariana Islands of Guam and Saipan.

A retired Coast Guardsman contacts the pentagon and confirms that J...more
David Roberts
I used to enjoy Tom Clancy's novels. He's done some excellent stuff. This one I found to be a little too contrived. His research is once again beyond reproach but it felt like it took a long time getting anywhere and when it did, it was over too quickly. A sort of 'And with one bound Jack was free' scenario.
Having said that, I did read it all. Maybe it's just because politics and time have made some of the scenario feel a little dated. I did read it when it came out and enjoyed it then.
Lauren
Debt of Honor is basically about what happens when the Americans mess with the Japanese. Our main character, Jack Ryan, has been called in as the National Security Advisor and must deal with all the problems that take place over the course of the book.

Ryan was a pretty boring character (at least for me, though this is the only Jack Ryan book I've read)and though he always knew what to do, he really had to flaws and was pretty flat. It seemed like Clancy just wanted to show off his favorite char...more
Mike Tueros
Another book that I started years ago and never finished (clearly not enough time on a plane back then). I enjoy the premise of the Clancy books, and the Jack Ryan character - however, it really plays out with more excitement in the movies (and I never say that about books to film). Clancy simply has too much detail - and you can get lost for pages in the technical mumbo-jumbo of the military, it's weapons, aircraft, or strategic procedures. Debt of Honor (written in 1994) starts with a wealthy...more
Jeff Brateman
Wow, that was long but worth it. I really enjoyed this book for the details, the plot line, and of course for the conclusion. I will start reading Executive orders as soon as possible because I can't wait to find out what happens. There were quite a few plots, and several connections to other books (like Mr. Clark's past) which were quite Clancy-ish coincidental, but it was enjoyable all the same. Also, I was able to forgive the Persian Gulf references, as his previous books have indicated that...more
Ithinkican2 Scott
Went through a Tom Clancy period for several years. This particular book left me literally dumbfounded at the end. Clancy weaves an intricate tale of intrigue which culminates in a brutal attack on the nation's capital. I remember not being able to stop reading during the climax - you know when you can't devour the words fast enough, your eyes skim to the next scene. I couldn't breathe and finally I sat in my chair and felt all the air sucked out of my lungs and I began to cry like a baby! This...more
Pat Norwine
It was hard to get into as there is so much going on in the beginning that it is hard to keep all the different scenarios and people straight. About half way through, it finally came together for me and then I didn't want to stop reading it. Tom Clancy has to be one of the most intelligent people around. He seemed to know intimate details for how everything works - from submarines, fighter planes, secret service agents, politics, wall street and ......
This is one of THE most complex books I have...more
Amanda
Jan 13, 2010 Amanda rated it 4 of 5 stars
Recommended to Amanda by: Optimism
Shelves: read-in-2010
A 3.5, but for the ending. After Hunt for Red October, I'll admit I wasn't too excited to get into another Clancy. I enjoyed Rainbow Six, but my attention to detail can only be held so long. Nice of Clancy to shift from Russian-bashing (though his stereotypes still grate on me- in this book, he managed to insult the Russians, Japanese, Arabs, and women from what I remember). The submarine/plane details again get a little heavy, particularly around the 600-700 page mark when you just want someone...more
Melissa Greenaway
The entire series is summed up like this: 300-400 pages of slow moving set-up, followed by action that keeps you glued to the page, so sort of military chapter that goes over my head, and an ending that makes you want to start reading the next book right away. And then you hate yourself because you have to read 400 pages of background again.

That being said, this one has the best ending.
Garrett Klein
Another stellar thriller from Tom Clancy. I really enjoyed his exposition of the mindset of the antagonists, as usual, but it was made even better by the contrast between Japanese and American culture.

Mr. Clark and Domingo Chavez make an appearance, and their part of the plot enjoyable as well.

And the ending. I won't spoil it, but it will blow. your. mind.

Highly recommended.
Indah Threez Lestari
Salah satu buku dengan ending yang mengejutkan. Spoiler alert mode on... jangan baca lanjutannya kalau belum baca buku ini!

Jack Ryan yang semula menjabat National Security Advisor diangkat menjadi Wakil Presiden. Namun ketika Jack Ryan sedang dalam perjalanan menuju Capitol Hill untuk pengambilan sumpah, seorang pilot pesawat komersil Jepang (yang anaknya tewas dalam perang singkat Jepang-AS di novel ini) menabrakkan pesawatnya ke gedung Capitol Hill, menewaskan 99% pemimpin AS yang berkumpul di...more
Nola
Of all the Jack Ryan books, this is my least favorite, though it still makes for an enjoyable read. I think the biggest reason for the lack of enthusiasm stems from the basic idea of an economic war...while both relevant and a pertinent issue, an all-out attack on the American financial system lacks the drive of a family under siege from terrorists or a president under threat from a member of the Secret Service. That said, the story and writing still top the co authored non-Ryan series, or the L...more
Robin
Sep 24, 2009 Robin rated it 4 of 5 stars
Shelves: 2009
This is the third Tom Clancy book I have read (Without Remorse and The Sum of All Fears were the others). This one got off to a slow start for me, but I really enjoyed watching as all of the incredibly detailed and intricate plot-lines wove together. And (hoo boy!) the ending is pretty spectacular. It really makes me want to run out and get the next book. But I won't. At least, not right away. Because all I've done in every spare minute over the last week is read this book, and I really have oth...more
Matthew Perry
Out of the seven Clancy books I've read HfRO, RR, PG, CotK, CaPD, SoAF, and now DoH, Debt of Honor is my alltime favorite. Perhaps it is just a personal like. The story begins with a Japanese industrialist who dreams of turning Japan into a national powerhouse. He accomplishes this by attacking America's financial superstructure and her Pacific defense systems. The way that Clancy tells this story is very riveting.
Mark Kaye
Wow!!!!!!!!! What a great book. It was a typical long wordy from the Tom Clancy, but very enjoyable. As usual his books are like a Chess Game. You play for a while putting all your pieces in place then strike, and the game gets going, it is the same here, first few chapters are slow but then it gets going an you can't stop reading. I got lost on the economical and financial details but that is just me, I did get the ideas laid out in that area of the story so over all I could still grasp what wa...more
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Tom Clancy was an English major at Baltimore’s Loyola College. As a Maryland insurance broker with a passion for naval history, his dream of writing a novel came true with his first effort, The Hunt for Red October (1984).

He since wrote more than a dozen novels, which have a blend of realism and authenticity, intricate plotting, and razor-sharp suspense. Ten of the novels, including The Teeth of...more
More about Tom Clancy...
The Hunt for Red October (Jack Ryan, #3) Patriot Games (Jack Ryan, #1) Clear and Present Danger (Jack Ryan, #5) Red Storm Rising Without Remorse (John Clark, #1)

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