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A Vindication of the Rights of Woman: with Strictures on Political and Moral Subjects

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3.77  ·  Rating Details  ·  47 Ratings  ·  4 Reviews
First published in 1792, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman was an instant success, turning its thirty-three-year-old author into a minor celebrity. A pioneering work of early feminism that extends to women the Enlightenment principle of "the rights of man," its argument remains as relevant today as it was for Woll-stonecraft's contemporaries. "Mary Wollstonecraft was no ...more
Paperback, 256 pages
Published June 12th 2001 by Modern Library (first published January 1st 1980)
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Rebecca Clyburn
To understand a thing, one must look at its history. I did not realize the depths from which feminism was raised. I did not know the subhuman existence of eighteenth century women. I do now.
I have gained a newfound hatred for Rousseau.
Also, I feel like "reason" was a bit of a hot word at the time, and overused in this work.
Manda
May 28, 2008 Manda rated it it was amazing
Wollstonecraft's common-sense argument for the necessity of proper education for women reads as shockingly modern, considering it was written in 1792. A lot of her radical propositions are things that we take for granted today, which goes to show just what a landmark work of feminist writing this was.
Helen Black
Dec 28, 2015 Helen Black rated it really liked it
excellent and sadly still relevant ideas. bit repetitive though
Esmeralda
Feb 12, 2008 Esmeralda rated it it was amazing
Shelves: politics, feminism
This was used for various papers in college.
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1853305
Mary Wollstonecraft was an eighteenth century British writer, philosopher, and feminist. Among the general public and specifically among feminists, Wollstonecraft's life has received much more attention than her writing because of her unconventional, and often tumultuous, personal relationships. After two ill-fated affairs, with Henry Fuseli and Gilbert Imlay, Wollstonecraft married the philosophe ...more
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“either nature has made a great difference between man and man, or that the world is not yet anywhere near to being fully civilized.” 0 likes
“Love, the common passion, in which chance and sensation take place of choice and reason, is in some degree, felt by the mass of mankind; for it is not necessary to speak, at present, of the emotions that rise above or sink below love. This passion, naturally increased by suspense and difficulties, draws the mind out of its accustomed state, and exalts the affections; but the security of marriage, allowing the fever of love to subside, a healthy temperature is thought insipid, only by those who have not sufficient intellect to substitute the calm tenderness of friendship, the confidence of respect, instead of blind admiration, and the sensual emotions of fondness. This is, must be, the course of nature—friendship or indifference inevitably succeeds love. And this constitution seems perfectly to harmonize with the system of government which prevails in the moral world. Passions are spurs to action, and open the mind; but they sink into mere appetites, become a personal momentary gratification, when the object is gained, and the satisfied mind rests in enjoyment.” 0 likes
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