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The Works of Robert G. Ingersoll, Vol. 4 (of 12) Dresden Edition-Lectures

4.29  ·  Rating Details ·  7 Ratings  ·  1 Review
This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.
Kindle Edition, 244 pages
Published February 14th 2012 (first published November 1st 2009)
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Mario García
Jan 26, 2012 Mario García rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
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The brilliance of Robert G. Ingersoll remains -perhaps- unparalleled in his time and geographic location. Reading a text from such a cultured man always leads you to ask, what's wrong with the cultural industry of the 21st century?

The means of the 19th century were not even close to the ones we enjoy today. Yet, Ingersoll accounts for most of the discoveries and Science of his time, offering detailed insight of that what was wrong with the culture from his own historic place. You can take it as
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"On August 11, 1833, was born the greatest and noblest of the Western World; an immense personality, -- unique, lovable, sublime; the peerless orator of all time, and as true a poet as Nature ever held in tender clasp upon her loving breast, and, in words coined for the chosen few, told of the joys and sorrows, hopes, dreams, and fears of universal life; a patriot whose golden words and deathless ...more
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“Religion can never reform mankind because religion is slavery. It is far better to be free, to leave the forts and barricades of fear, to stand erect and face the future with a smile. It is far better to give yourself sometimes to negligence, to drift with wave and tide, with the blind force of the world, to think and dream, to forget the chains and limitations of the breathing life, to forget purpose and object, to lounge in the picture gallery of the brain, to feel once more the clasps and kisses of the past, to bring life's morning back, to see again the forms and faces of the dead, to paint fair pictures for the coming years, to forget all Gods, their promises and threats, to feel within your veins life's joyous stream and hear the martial music, the rhythmic beating of your fearless heart. And then to rouse yourself to do all useful things, to reach with thought and deed the ideal in your brain, to give your fancies wing, that they, like chemist bees, may find art's nectar in the weeds of common things, to look with trained and steady eyes for facts, to find the subtle threads that join the distant with the now, to increase knowledge, to take burdens from the weak, to develop the brain, to defend the right, to make a palace for the soul. This is real religion. This is real worship” 101 likes
“The hands that help are better far than lips that pray.” 72 likes
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