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Ten Days to Self-Esteem

3.84  ·  Rating Details  ·  311 Ratings  ·  11 Reviews
Do you wake up dreading the day?
Do you feel ciscouraged with what you've accomplished in life?
Do you want greater self-esteem, productivity, and joy in daily living?

If so, you will benefit from this revolutionary way of brightening your moods without drugs or lengthy therapy. All you need is your own common sense and the easy-to-follow methods revealed in this book by one
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Paperback, 336 pages
Published March 17th 1999 by William Morrow Paperbacks (first published 1993)
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Caelie
Mar 27, 2013 Caelie rated it really liked it
Shelves: non-fiction
I'm going through old paperwork and I found the exercises in this book that I did over 5 years ago with a therapist. I frequently come back to some of the tools I learned from this book especially a part on distorted thinking patterns.
Heather Southard
Mar 29, 2009 Heather Southard rated it it was amazing
It didn't take all 10 days for me to see the errors in my thought processes...
Ian Johnston
Jul 31, 2013 Ian Johnston rated it it was amazing
This is a very practical introduction to Cognitive Behavioural Therapy through a series of lessons and worksheets. It doesn't have to be done in 10 days, really, and I felt taking my time with it was worthwhile.

CBT is all about changing the way you think to change the way you feel. It certainly worked for me. The theory is that no situation causes us to feel something, rather, the way we react to the situation is what causes our feelings. Take the example of a rejection. Rejections are not exact
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Nikita Golubov
Feb 01, 2015 Nikita Golubov rated it liked it
Daily Mood Log — без вопросов простая и эффективная техника, а авторские тесты позволяют отслеживать прогресс в работе с негативными мыслями. Но всё-таки большая часть книги показалась "набивкой": слишком много не связанных друг с другом упражнений и повторений.
Brendan Howard
Jun 14, 2015 Brendan Howard rated it it was amazing
Changed my life in graduate school and after ...
Beth
Sep 29, 2012 Beth rated it liked it
Shelves: for-fun, 2012
Burns provides highly useful information for coming to terms with one's mood state and underlying causes of anxiety, although I found the "clinical" mode of the book a little off-putting.
Shanyn
Jul 27, 2013 Shanyn rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
bought this book for a class, lots of exercises and ideas- Will be using this book again, taking class again
Jen
Oct 06, 2009 Jen rated it it was ok
Shelves: books-for-work
Read this for work and it was a bit over the top... I don't know, it just didn't gel with me.
Kelly
Sep 29, 2015 Kelly rated it it was amazing
putting aside for the present - go A LOT of value out of the first half
Nathaniel Smith
Dec 15, 2012 Nathaniel Smith rated it it was amazing
Great book for anyone struggling with Self-Esteem.
Larissa
Jun 05, 2013 Larissa rated it it was amazing
a REAL life saver...
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David D. Burns is an adjunct professor emeritus in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University School of Medicine and the author of the best-selling book Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy. Burns popularized cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) when his book became a best seller during the 1980s.

Burns received his B.A. from Amherst College in 1964 and his M.D. fro
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“Characteristics of Healthy, Constructive Anger Characteristics of Unhealthy, Destructive Anger 1. You express your feelings in a tactful way. 1. You deny your feelings and pout (passive aggression) or lash out and attack the other person (active aggression). 2. You try to see the world through the other person’s eyes, even if you disagree. 2. You argue defensively and insist there’s no validity in what the other person is saying. 3. You convey a spirit of respect for the other person, even though you may feel quite angry with him or her. 3. You believe the other person is despicable and deserving of punishment. You appear condescending or disrespectful. 4. You do something productive and try to solve the problem. 4. You give up and see yourself as a helpless victim. 5. You try to learn from the situation so you will be wiser in the future. 5. You don’t learn anything new. You feel that your view of the situation is absolutely valid. 6. You eventually let go of the anger and feel happy again. 6. Your anger becomes addictive. You won’t let go of it. 7. You examine your own behavior to see how you may have contributed to the problem. 7. You blame the other person and see yourself as an innocent victim. 8. You believe that you and the other person both have valid ideas and feelings that deserve to be understood. 8. You insist that you are entirely right and the other person is entirely wrong. You feel convinced that truth and justice are on your side. 9. Your commitment to the other person increases. Your goal is to feel closer to him or her. 9. You avoid or reject the other person. You write him or her off. 10. You look for a solution where you can both win and nobody has to lose. 10. You feel like you’re in a battle or a competition. If one person wins, you feel that the other one will be a loser. Now that you’ve examined sadness and anger, I’d like you to compare healthy fear with neurotic anxiety. What are some of the differences? Think about the kinds of events that might bring on these feelings, how long the feelings last, whether the thoughts are realistic or distorted, and so forth. See if you can think of five differences, and list them here. The answer to this exercise is on page 88. Try to come up with your own ideas before you look. Characteristics of Healthy Fear Characteristics of Neurotic Anxiety 1. 1. 2. 2. 3. 3. 4. 4. 5. 5. Similarly, healthy remorse is not the same as neurotic guilt. What are some of the differences? List them here. Characteristics of Healthy Remorse Characteristics of” 0 likes
“Characteristics of Healthy, Constructive Anger Characteristics of Unhealthy, Destructive Anger 1. You express your feelings in a tactful way. 1. You deny your feelings and pout (passive aggression) or lash out and attack the other person (active aggression). 2. You try to see the world through the other person’s eyes, even if you disagree. 2. You argue defensively and insist there’s no validity in what the other person is saying. 3. You convey a spirit of respect for the other person, even though you may feel quite angry with him or her. 3. You believe the other person is despicable and deserving of punishment. You appear condescending or disrespectful. 4. You do something productive and try to solve the problem. 4. You give up and see yourself as a helpless victim. 5. You try to learn from the situation so you will be wiser in the future. 5. You don’t learn anything new. You feel that your view of the situation is absolutely valid. 6. You eventually let go of the anger and feel happy again. 6. Your anger becomes addictive. You won’t let go of it. 7. You examine your own behavior to see how you may have contributed to the problem. 7. You blame the other person and see yourself as an innocent victim. 8. You believe that you and the other person both have valid ideas and feelings that deserve to be understood. 8. You insist that you are entirely right and the other person is entirely wrong. You feel convinced that truth and justice are on your side. 9. Your commitment to the other person increases. Your goal is to feel closer to him or her. 9. You avoid or reject the other person. You write him or her off. 10. You look for a solution where you can both win and nobody has to lose. 10. You feel like you’re in a battle or a competition. If one person wins, you feel that the other one will be a loser.” 0 likes
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