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The Most Beautiful Molecule: The Discovery of the Buckyball

3.85  ·  Rating Details  ·  20 Ratings  ·  2 Reviews
Houston, Texas, 1985. Two industrious chemists discover a previously unknown form of carbon and christen it buckminsterfullerene, for its striking resemblance to American architect Richard Buckminster Fuller's geodesic domes. This unusual molecule - also known as the buckyball - is composed of 60 carbon atoms arranged in a hollow sphere, with hexagonal and pentagonal confi ...more
Paperback, 340 pages
Published October 21st 1997 by Wiley
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Chemistry
73rd out of 127 books — 14 voters


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Flibertigib
May 06, 2009 Flibertigib rated it it was ok
very interesting subject material, but it was like the guy needed to fill a word count quota. would take pages and pages to say the simplest things.
5x5 Walls
Sep 08, 2010 5x5 Walls rated it really liked it
Wonderful story about how the buckyball was discovered.
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740196
I was born in London in 1959, the same year C.P. Snow gave his infamous ‘two cultures’ lecture about the apparently eternal divide in Britain between the arts and sciences. Perhaps this is where it all begins. Forced to choose one or the other at school and university, I chose the latter, gaining an MA in natural sciences from Cambridge.

By graduation, I was aware of a latent interest in the arts,
...more
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