The Return of the King (The Lord of the Rings, #3)
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The Return of the King (The Lord of the Rings #3)

4.48 of 5 stars 4.48  ·  rating details  ·  336,834 ratings  ·  4,138 reviews
Concluding the story begun in The Hobbit, this is the final part of Tolkien's epic masterpiece, The Lord of the Rings.

The armies of the Dark Lord are massing as his evil shadow spreads ever wider. Men, Dwarves, Elves and Ents unite forces to do battle agains the Dark. Meanwhile, Frodo and Sam struggle further into Mordor in their heroic quest to destroy the One Ring.

Imposs...more
Mass Market Paperback, 490 pages
Published July 12th 1986 by Del Rey (first published October 20th 1955)
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Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 3,000)
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mark monday
♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

a rousing climax to the most ravishing love story of the modern age. tempestuous, tormented Frodo at long last learns to accept the love of his lifemate - the loyal and submissive Samwise Gamgee, bottom-extraordinaire. this is truly a tale of love's labour hard-won, and at such a cost! but love conquers all in the end, and even bitter, militantly hetero villain Sauron cannot stand in the heart's path for too long. in this third book of the torrid trilogy, Frodo's love-hate relationship...more
Stephen
***NEW LAWSUIT UPDATE BELOW (6-30-11)...Lone reviewer continues fight with corporate ASSCLOWNS powers in epic 1st Amendment battle royale.***

4.0 stars. FULL REVIEW (hopefully) to follow after resolution of the lawsuit* filed against this reviewer in the District Court of Narnia by, among others: 20th Century Fucks Fox, Lucasfilms, the Tolkien Estate and Robert Van Winkle (aka Vanilla AsshatIce) in order to prevent the release of an allegedly offensive but in reality just knee-slappingly funny PA...more
K.D. Absolutely
Jun 15, 2012 K.D. Absolutely rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to K.D. by: 501 Must Read Books; 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die (2006-2010); TFG100 Most Favorite Books; Time 100; Metalist 100 by Newsweek; Guardian's 100
What else can I say? I enjoyed all these three books included in
The Lord of the Rings

The Fellowship of the Ring (The Lord of the Rings, #1) by J.R.R. Tolkien (5 STARS), The Two Towers (The Lord of the Rings, #2) by J.R.R. Tolkien (5 STARS) and now
The Return of the King (The Lord of the Rings, #3) by J.R.R. Tolkien(5 STARS).

It has the most tight interesting plot, memorable characters and universal unending theme: the triumph of good over evil. In fact, in the closing scene of the book, Frodo gives the book he wrote to Sam, the world's greatest gardener. The title of the book is The Downfall of the Lord of the Rings and the Return of the King. The "lord" refers to the evil king Sauron...more
Jonathan Cullen
A Review of Lord of the Rings: Return of the King, by Sauron

[Oprah Winfrey voice-over]: We all remember him. Sauron, the displaced Lord of the Rings. Once feared by millions, Sauron has been living in relative squalor in what he prefers to remain an undisclosed location.

[Video shows unidentified heap of garbage behind a Wal-mart. In front stands a mailbox with the word "Nameless Enemy" printed on the front. The flag is down.]

[applause]

Oprah: Today, we'll be joined by someone that many of you kn...more
Keely
Writers who inspire a genre are usually misunderstood. Tolkien's reasons for writing were completely unlike those of the authors he inspired. He didn't have an audience, a genre, and scores of contemporaries. There was a tradition of high adventure fairy tales, as represented by Eddison, Dunsany, Morris, MacDonald, Haggard, and Kipling, but this was only part of what inspired Tolkien.

His writing was chiefly influenced by his familiarity with the mythological traditions of the Norse and Welsh cul...more
Roly Chuter
I’m sure glad Stevie didn’t bother to read this one:
Sam and Frodo wake up in some swamp/heath/mountain pass
Frodo: We’re lost, oh its awful, I’m hungry, we only have 3 pieces of elfin bread left
Sam: Don’t worry Frodo I’m here for you, you have the bread
Sam and Frodo walk around a bit looking dirty and lost and miserable
Frodo: oh the ring, it’s so heavy, how will I cope?
Golem: Myyy presssciousss [and all that nonsense]
Sam: Don’t worry you have a nice sleep, things’ll look better in the morning you...more
Liz
Is it even possible to review a legend? To write a review about a completely different and unique world?

It is not. It is just not possible.
Just imagine writing a review about our world, about all the countries and cities and cultures and all the wars. It would simply be too long and too difficult.

What I can say about this book is that the epic journey finally came to an end.
The Fellowship had to fight bloody, hopeless fights, it had to survive epic battles and it found friends where friends...more
Todd
To me, the whole point of reading the first two books of LOTR is to get to this one, because this is the truly masterful part of the story.

One thing I will say is that I really admire how the main heroes of the story, Frodo and Sam, are quite inconsequential in the classic tradition of heroes. They can't fight, they can't cast spells, they can't really do anything except persevere through extreme trial, all so that they can do what they promised to do, to do the right thing. Sam, in particular,...more
Caris
How I Spent My Summer Vacation
by: Caris “The O’Malley” O’Malley

This summer was really good. I got to do a lot of neat things. The best part of the whole summer was that I got to spend it with my new best friend Johnny. Johnny is my friend because he’s smart and he tells good stories and his mustash tickles. The stories he tells are filled with creatures and adventures, so they’re really good.

Johnny is really serious about his stories. Sometimes he gets really detailed about little things and I h...more
Lyndz


Well, there really IS no greater compliment...
Tatiana
The more times I read The Lord of the Rings, the more I love it, and the more important it is for me. I first discovered it in college, starting with The Hobbit (which is my recommended starting point). I deeply love Tolkien, this world, this universe, the legends, the histories, the people, and the story. The Greeks said that everything was in Homer. If you studied Homer, all virtue and understanding, everything you needed to know was in there. I feel the same way about the Lord of the Rings.

Th...more
Kim

I've just spent two months in Middle Earth, listening to audiobooks of The Hobbit and then each of the books in The Lord of the Rings trilogy, one after the other.

Last week, when I finished The Two Towers, I thought it would be my favourite novel of the trilogy. In any event, I knew that I liked it better than The Fellowship of the Ring, as it has more action and less talk about action. Now I think that this may be my favourite of the three books. I don't recall my attention flagging. Nor do I...more
midnightfaerie
The Return of the King was by far the best Lord of the Rings yet. It made me cry several times and had some key elements to it that really made it the best and rounded out the series perfectly. First of all, we have my favorite part, when the hobbits come back to the Shire. They've been through so much and are hoping to rest but are sorely mistaken when they find their beloved Shire in ruins. Trees cut down, water polluted, homes destroyed, and basically a gang of ruffians has taken over. These...more
Julie Davis
What becomes very noticeable to me at this point, listening as opposed to reading, is the juxtaposition of the two kings and their hobbit observers. One has been brought back to himself after being under the Dark Lord's sway and the other is prideful and arrogant. It is a striking contrast.

Another thing is how touched I was by the description of those coming to the defense of Gondor, early after Gandalf and Pippin got there. They were the few, those coming out of common need to defend themselves...more
Jon
I've read and re-read The Lord of the Rings so many times. Why? Because it sings to my soul and sends it soaring.

This last volume, or last few books, of the epic tale of Middle Earth, has always been my favorite.

And it's the relationships and the struggles that appeal most - Frodo and Sam, Boromir and his father, Aragorn and Gandalf, Legolas and Gimli.

At the end of all things, even a perpetually optimistic Hobbit can be tempted, can fall, just like all of us fall short. Yet the sacrifice and...more
Chris
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Nikki
There: I've finally finished my reread of The Lord of the Rings. I'm trying to remember when I last reread it. Probably three years ago, maybe four, because I went through a long period where I was sure it would have lost its magic, and I mostly just remembered the accusations of how slow it was, how boring, how long it took to get anything done. That was true, as far as it matters: Tolkien is wordy, but I like the way he writes. I wasn't wrong in remembering that it tasted nice to me, with the...more
Markus Molina
Wellllllll,


I really loved the second half. Once Frodo and Sam got going, I got into it. Their part of the tale has always been the main story and Frodo is the primary protagonist, so it only makes sense that his stuff is the best. I was very disappointed to find that Gollum hardly comes out, especially considering he's probably my favorite character in LOTR. But overall, I'd give most of the second half and the ending especially a 4/5

The first half was really, really boring for me and I struggle...more
Nikki
The Return of the King is perhaps my least favourite of the three volumes. Part of that is the slow hideous crawl to Mordor, of course, despite the bright valour of Aragorn and Eowyn and most of the people in Minas Tirith -- even the death of Denethor is good to read, though sad. Part of it is the fact that a huge chunk of it, over a hundred pages in my edition, is the winding up of the story. There are some beautiful bits, of course, but Tolkien's descriptions of joy and victory don't ring quit...more
Jenifer
I am including the ratings and reviews of ;
Eliza (16) 5 stars. She especially liked the ending. The satisfying tying up of all the ends. She loved that the story came full circle and ended in the Shire.
Amelia (13) 4 1/2 stars. She had to take away half a point for the long, boringish parts.
Max (10) 2 stars. He liked the beginning because it was the beginning and that was fun. He liked the ending because it was over. He had a hard time with all the boringness in between.

This was a huge undertakin...more
Greg of A2
And so it ends. What Tolkien did so well in the final book was to provide closure to the story. The fellowship is allowed to part ways in a fine and loving fashion. Most writers never go to these lengths to conclude a story (probably an additional 40 pages after the destruction of the ring and the completion of the quest). And just when you think the story had come to a quiet end, the return to the Shire is filled with drama. And here, Tolkien gives the reader a chance to observe the new found c...more
Nikki
I fear I'm never going to like The Return of the King as much as the rest, although when you think about it there's so much good in it -- Eowyn, and Faramir, and the victory which... isn't quite at the end, but more in the middle. I think Book V might actually be my favourite, in some ways, but Book VI, well... kind of bores me? I think there's too much emphasis on telling us how joyful everyone is, making the ceremonies too high and making it all a bit precious. And then Tolkien doesn't seem to...more
Namratha Kumar
If a book compels me to be brave...if a book makes me yearn for courage and a steely will...if a book makes me wish that I were a shield maiden taking on a Witch-King....if a book makes me imagine the satisfying clink of a gleaming sword as I draw it from it's sheath...if a book makes tears stream down my face...if a book makes me believe that yes, even the smallest, most unexpected person can change the course of history....if a book can break my heart, renew my spirit and make me believe in a...more
Patrícia
A mãe de todas as fantasias, a inspiração para todos os autores que transcenderam as imaginações e criaram novos mundos, a obra de todas as obras, é assim, e muito mais, que podemos ver O Senhor dos Anéis. Demanda de amizade, lealdade, honra e feitos lendários, terra de hobbits, elfos, anões, ents e homens, escolha entre o Bem e o Mal, onde as canções ganham vida, os mitos têm um fundo de verdade e as profecias se realizam. Assim se escreveu a história da Terra Média, da Guerra do Anel, do regre...more
sj
I hosted a group read over the summer of The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings called Puttin' the Blog in Balrog. It was a lot of fun and many people participated. Condensed below are my posts for this book. If you'd like to read the rest (or see what the other participants posted), you can find links to everything here.

Return of the King! Guys, we are so close to being done, I can taste the ash from the fires of Mount Doom. Okay, so maybe that's a lie, but still.

If you read the second half of Mandy'...more
Filipa
Foi giro. A leitura dos apêndices é que é uma seca e é quase do tamanho da história propriamente dita. CONTÉM SPOILERS


**


A trilogia do Senhor dos Anéis chega ao final com este livro, O Regresso do Rei. Representa, o clímax e o auge de toda esta aventura que começa com um hobbit e um anel.
Muito já aconteceu, mas ainda mais coisas estarão para vir no início deste Regresso.
Após todos os acontecimentos que o leitor acompanha ao longo de dois livros com todos os ingredientes necessários para fazer d...more
Kristin
This was technically a re-read, but since it was twenty years ago that I read it the first time I decided I could review it here. When the LotR trilogy came out in the theaters, I was reading the books after watching the theatrical release. Except for RotK. I either wasn't in the mood to read it or I just bounced off of it. After our trip to Vegas, we watched RotK again, and I decided that I was at last ready to give the book another attempt.

Do I need to summarize RotK? I think enough folks hav...more
(´*•.¸ღBexღ¸.•*´)
What is there not to like of J.R.R. Tokien books? It is lots of fun, plenty of adventure, action, battles, humor, hobbits, men, elves, dwarves, et., etc., etc.
Book two of "The Lord of the Rings" trilogy, "The Two Towers", ends with Gandalf the Wizard and Pippin the hobbit traveling to Minas Tirith. Also Frodo the Ring-bearing hobbit and his faithful friend, Sam, are separated in the land of Mordor, Frodo in the hands of the dreadful orcs.

Now we go into book three, "The Return of the King". It's...more
Ruby
This book was really, really good! It's an epic ending to the series. The ending is a little sad, though, and there are two appendices in the back that total about two-hundred pages.
I was happy with how everything turned out. The deaths were reasonable, too. The writing is still a little tricky to figure out, but besides that, it was good. I also watched the movie, and it is totally awesome and a perfect representation of the book, even if it's long.
I recommend it very much.

All in all, the lord...more
J
So, I *finally* finished LOTR. Don't get me wrong, they're fantastic novels. But you can really tell that it's Tolkien's "baby"...there's too much backstory for my taste. You'll never find any plot holes, because Tolkiens comprehends his fictional world so well that everything blends seamlessly together. However, a lot of the time I found myself wondering why he had bothered putting certain parts in...like the multiple descriptions of feasts and forests. Or the ardous lists of hierarchies and ki...more
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John Ronald Reuel Tolkien, CBE, was an English writer, poet,WWI veteran (British Army), philologist, and university professor, best known as the author of the high fantasy classic works The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings .

Tolkien was Rawlinson and Bosworth Professor of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford from 1925 to 1945, and Merton Professor of English language and literature from 1945 to 1959. He was a cl...more
More about J.R.R. Tolkien...
The Hobbit (Middle-Earth Universe) The Fellowship of the Ring (The Lord of the Rings, #1) The Two Towers (The Lord of the Rings, #2) The Lord of the Rings (The Lord of the Rings, #1-3) The Hobbit: Graphic Novel

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“I am glad you are here with me. Here at the end of all things, Sam.” 1756 likes
“What do you fear, lady?" [Aragorn] asked.
"A cage," [Éowyn] said. "To stay behind bars, until use and old age accept them, and all chance of doing great deeds is gone beyond recall or desire.”
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