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The Devouring Dragon: How China's Rise Threatens Our Natural World

3.58  ·  Rating Details ·  36 Ratings  ·  7 Reviews
China's rise is assaulting the natural world at an alarming rate. In a few short years, China has become the planet's largest market for endangered wildlife, its top importer of tropical trees, and its biggest emitter of greenhouse gases. Its rapid economic growth has driven up the world's very metabolism: in Brazil, farmers clear large swaths of the Amazon to plant soybea ...more
Paperback, 304 pages
Published July 15th 2014 by St. Martin's Griffin (first published January 8th 2013)
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(showing 1-30)
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Larry
Jun 29, 2013 Larry rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
The garish cover suggests that this book is a Western attack on China's rapid growth, but this is not the case. The book is really a love song to the earth and a lament about its destruction. Some of the best parts of the book are descriptions of nature.

The author has close ties with China. The only reason China gets major emphasis is that because billions of Chinese have a much better chance of raising their standard of living, the pressure this will put on species survival, forests, and natura
...more
Scott Rhee
China's population is a staggering 1.3 billion people (as of 2011), with a projected growth of roughly 200 million more people. A coal-burning industrial nation, China has burned roughly 4 billion tons of coal, making it the world's largest coal consumer. It is the fastest-growing nation in the world, in terms of economic and industrial growth, but it is also the most polluted.

Everyone knows that China can not sustain its growth, even the Chinese. To continue on the path that it is currently on
...more
Katrina Woznicki
Oct 23, 2013 Katrina Woznicki rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This book changed how I shop. For example, instead of replacing our everyday dishes with something from Target or Pottery Barn (with the "Made in China" stickers), this book inspired me to go on Etsy.com, find an artist within driving distance, and have a set of dishes made for us.
Claire
Sep 30, 2015 Claire rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I think some of the problems here are more than solely from China, but mankind as a whole.
Perhaps the People's Republic may be a large contributor, and the problems may be clearly connected to with Chinese production, but I thought it also said China led the world in efforts to minimise our carbon footprint, or something like that... (I might have seen that somewhere else.)

I found Simons' research extremely intriguing to consider, and this did not go off onto many insistent "save the earth!"-ty
...more
Claire
Aug 16, 2015 Claire rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
I finished this book a while ago, but I accidentally didn't mark it. This matter sincerely perplexes me. I appreciated Simons' literature on the topic, though, and the number of other sources I could collect from this work.

I could have sworn I had written something about this a while ago, about how I thought the "China" of the title is pars pro toto - the author just picking part of an issue to indicate a huge problem.
Guess not.
S2 Mc
Jul 04, 2015 S2 Mc rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: world-current
Mostly liberal global warming screed and fear-mongering, but valid points about Chinese consumption and ignorant traditional medicine that continue to endanger rare animal species.
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