My Dog Never Says Please
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My Dog Never Says Please

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3.82 of 5 stars 3.82  ·  rating details  ·  34 ratings  ·  10 reviews
Spunky Ginny Mae can't be bothered with trivial things like manners and politeness-she'd rather run around barefoot and eat without silverware like her dog, Ol' Red. So, in a hilarious turn of events, Ginny Mae decides to join Ol' Red out in the doghouse. But after a few hours of communing with her canine companion, she learns that a dog's life isn't all it's cracked up to...more
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Published July 1st 2000 by Puffin (first published 1997)
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Katlin Sims
This book is so cute and a great funny story about manners. Ginny Mae wants to live like her dog, Ol' Red, and not be bothered with manners and doing what her parents say. In an effort to ride herself of rules, Ginny Mae embarks upon an adventure to live life like a dog - even if only for a day. A great activity to do with this would be to make a chart with "good manners for dogs" and "good manners for people" and ask each child to contribute on good manner for people or dogs.
Caitlin Barclay
This book is another example of writing how we talk. The author shares with us the setting by including the Southern accent that the characters have. The southern accent also adds to the humor of this persuasive story. Although the dog is a dog, I think that most students would connect to this story due to the fact that their life is rules by rules!This is a great way to introduce persuasive writing and also the idea of manners and why dogs don't have them!
Sheri
Still looking for a book to read to students and get them interested in persuasive
paragraphs. They like the idea of being without manners. Ginny is pretty headstrong
and decides her dog does it best. But she decides things aren't greener in the dog's
house with the dog food.
Don't think this book will be good example to kids about saying please and being
polite, but is funny to the readers
Stacy
Nov 24, 2008 Stacy rated it 4 of 5 stars
Recommended to Stacy by: I think I got it from my sister
Shelves: children-s-books
This cute little story has VOICE. You just can not help but read it with a southern drawl.

In this story, Ginny Mae Perkins decides that her dog Rex has a pretty sweet life. No one makes any demands on ol' Rex. She decides to become a dog. A funny story, funny pictures and a great bedtime story!
Alice
This a very fun book and I am sure exactly what my parents would say to me if I said I wanted to be a dog. The pictures are good and the story is fun! My co-worker and I laughed through the whole thing. Great book to talk about manners or just a fun book to read!
Kelci Cox-Griswold
This is such a cute book. It has some great voice and expression because it is written with an accent. It could be used to teach kids about manners. It could also be a fun way to teach persuasive writing.
Shelli
Ginny doesn't understand why her family is always hounding her about manners. The dog doesn't say please, thank you, or has to clean his dog house. Maybe life as a dog would be better?
Lindsay
manners, being polite, family life with a dog
Ashley
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