Yann Andrea Steiner
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Yann Andrea Steiner

3.87 of 5 stars 3.87  ·  rating details  ·  123 ratings  ·  6 reviews
Dedicated to Duras’ companion with whom she spent her last decade of life, Yann Andréa Steiner is a haunting dance between two parallel stories of love and solitude: the love between Duras and the young Yann Andréa and a seaside romance observed – or imagined – by the narrator between a camp counselor and an orphaned camper, a Holocaust survivor who witnessed his sister’s...more
Paperback, 109 pages
Published September 1st 2006 by Archipelago (first published 1989)
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M.
Jun 21, 2010 M. rated it 4 of 5 stars
Shelves: fiction, own, 2010
Short, late Duras, packs a similar punch as another favorite of mine, The Malady of Death. But totally different. As everybody and their dog has noted, there are ostensibly three interrelated narratives here: the "love story" of the "I" that is ostensibly Duras herself with the titular man (whom I initially read as gay) Yann, there is the "love story" of an 18 year old counselor and and 8 year old orphan, and there is a parable delivered by the counselor to the orphan. I don't know, but the frag...more
Claire
Yann Andrea Steiner comes from Duras’ later works and accordingly, reflects back on her life as a writer through the context of her love with the young man, Yann Andrea Steiner. The book weaves between three stories, times and places. The initial story is that of Duras and her lover, Steiner, as he comes to stay with her, breaking her habitual solitude. The story moves as Duras and Steiner observe from their window a six-year-old camper and his eighteen-year-old counselor fall in love on the be...more
Heather
My friend lent me this book. She told me that there was a talking shark within its pages. It's true—there is; it's part of an imagined story within a story about the past within a story about the present that alludes to a story perhaps written in the future. Somehow this doesn't become confusing and instead the book seems simple yet recognizes the complicated matter of love.
Cheryl
The paralleled stories of love and hardship--part fiction, part memoir--are fragile yet consuming. I love the paradoxicalness that is Duras!!!
Natalie
This is my favourite piece by Duras, I have read it a dozen times and it is always beautiful and moving.
Parastoo Geranmayeh
"And the kisses brought her back to life. Brought her back to life, through the forgetting of life."
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Marguerite Donnadieu, better known as Marguerite Duras (pronounced [maʀgəʁit dyˈʁas] in French) (April 4, 1914 – March 3, 1996) was a French writer and film director.

She was born at Gia-Dinh, near Saigon, French Indochina (now Vietnam), after her parents responded to a campaign by the French government encouraging people to work in the colony.

Marguerite's father fell ill soon after their arrival,...more
More about Marguerite Duras...
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“We tell each other things that have no relation to the afternoon’s events or the coming night but that relate to God, to his absence that is so present, like the breasts of the young girl, so young before the immensity of what is to come.” 1 likes
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