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Locas 1 (Love and Rockets)

4.18 of 5 stars 4.18  ·  rating details  ·  1,254 ratings  ·  104 reviews
Maggie Chascarrillo es una joven chicana cuya historia comienza a primeros de los 80, durante la eclosión del punk como revulsivo al rock mustio y anquilosado que imperaba en el panorama. Nuestra quinceañera se ve de pronto conectando plenamente con la anarquía, la vitalidad y el idealismo de la movida hardcore, gracias a la cual conoce y se hace amiga de Hopey Grass, otra ...more
Paperback, 276 pages
Published July 30th 2006 by Ediciones La Cúpula, S.A. (first published January 1st 2006)
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#15 for Jugs & Capes!
(See this review on CCLaP, where it was originally published.)

Oh man I am super psyched to be reading Love & Rockets finally. I'm listening to the band Love & Rockets while I write this review, which seems only fair.

As with so many of the Jugs & Capes books I've been reading and reviewing this year, I knew before I even cracked this one that people have strong opinions about it. All my research leads me to the same conclusion: These are early, early stories
Jenny (Reading Envy)
I read this because it was part of the Banned Comics Humble Bundle, although this particular volume has not been registered as challenged or banned. That is the case for a later volume of Love and Rockets / Locas / Hernández brothers, so I can't weigh in on that. I do somewhat appreciate being given two first-volumes in these linked series.

I had read The Love Bunglers, something like book #27 in this grouping, and was completely lost. At least this one starts at the beginning but this graphic no
most over-rated comic book series ever. while the drawings are good, the writing is absurdly flat. yeah, the girls are cute chicana punk rockers and they're are all kinds of appealing references to bands and movies and stuff, but there's zero psychological depth in the dialogue and you're not ever really given a reason to care about the characters. furthermore, i find the lesbian subtext hokey and not at all believable, as if making the two main characters sleep naked together in the same bed wa ...more
I have a much better understanding of why people love Jaime Hernandez's work now. This is an interesting book, with some interesting lumps in its oatmeal-- the early plots are as weak as the characters are strong, and while I understand how Hernandez is trying to build a world that is essentially the sci fi equivalent of magical realism, the sudden invasion of alien assassins in the book combines awkwardly with the ordinary lives of Maggie, Hopey, and friends.

As the stories continue, though, the
I enjoyed reading this first collection in the 'Love and Rockets' series. In my opinion, the very best thing about this book is the way the characters have been drawn: they all read brilliantly; they all look brilliant. Surrounded by the early '80s punk scene & whilst also taking some extra-ordinary trips into the sphere of sci-fi, the Mexican-American women, in particular, are portrayed as feisty, sharp & strong; they are clumsy, complex & colourful; they make trouble; they are brav ...more
I'd heard about Love & Rockets forever, but was always daunted by how to get into it since there were so many books out and it had such a long history. So I was really glad to discover this newly put together collection that gives each of the major story lines in an easy to read sequential format. That said, I realized once I started reading that I really had no idea what I was in for. I guess I was expecting something much more punk rock, and instead I discovered a surprisingly sweet, and s ...more
The earlier stories in this collection don't feel very focused, but they are still fun, and by the end of this book the world and characters are in sharp relief. Even secondary characters get fleshed out with backgrounds, complex motivations, etc.

Maggie and Hopey are two young women living in Southern California. In many ways their world reflects the real world of the early/mid eighties, when these stories were created. Mexican-American and punk/hardcore elements are most evident. There are also
I'd forgotten how much fun the Locas are. What strikes me going back and reading them as an adult (rather than the punk teen I was when I first ran across the Locas) is the character development. If Hernandez wrote these characters in a traditional novel format and under a female pen name, these characters would have been as famous as Bridget Jones. Maggie, lovelorn, moody, clumsy, determined Maggie is fully formed character. I love how we see her get fat. It's just another way she seems real.

Keith Irwin
Maggie the Mechanic is a collection of the early Jaime Hernández stories from Love and Rockets. It was okay. The early stories are weird and set in a weird science-fictiony future. The setting is never really well defined or explored. And then, through the course of the collection, the stories start to become more serious and character driven and also to move closer to present day in setting. It shows some potential, but I didn't really enjoy myself at all until I was more than halfway through i ...more
Todd S
Having read "at" a lot of Love & Rockets comics for a few decades now, it feels great to finally sit down and properly dive into what the Hernandez Brothers have been earnestly laying down since their first self-published issue in 1981. The stories in this volume range from a kind of magical realism layered with sci-fi tropes mixed with wrestling (strangely, Jaime Hernandez totally makes this work), to simple soap opera tales of families trying to get by and the curious twists and turns thei ...more
Fantasy Literature
Love and Rockets is a series of comics that started in the 1980s. It was written by three brothers: Gilbert, Jaime, and Mario Hernandez, and the brothers each created their own storylines, tracing a set of characters over a period of time, even allowing their characters to age and develop and change appearance, a too-rare technique employed in the world of comics, where most characters are ageless and timeless.

The first run on the series lasted fifty issues and ran from September 1982 to 1996. T

We meet Maggie and Hopey, friends/roommates/lovers. Maggie is headed to her first job as a prosolar mechanic in their vaguely sci-fi storyworld. We meet her fellow mechanics: love interest Rand Race, boss Duke, coworker Yax, and we learn Maggie is related to wrestling champ Vicki Glori. The mechanics are working a job for billionaire HR Costigan, when the call comes in that Corporate has decided to blow up the worksite -- a common occurrence.

The mechanics move on to the next job, but th
It's impossible for me to be completely objective here, having read and loved Jaime Hernandez's Love and Rockets comics when they were first released in the 80s. I was a teenager involved in the L.A. punk scene then and I had friends who seemed to leap right from the pages of the "Locas" comics, scenarios and experiences both painfully and happily similar to those lived by Maggie, Hopey, and their friends. In spite of the fun science fiction digressions in some of these stories - the robots, roc ...more
I really enjoyed this collection, at first it was a little odd, flying ships, robots, superheros and the early 80s LA punk scene, but after I got used to that they blended beautifully and I really loved them! I've been wanting to read Love and rockets for about 25 years since i first saw it advertised in the back of the comics I used to read, but somehow always failed to get around to it. But I'm really glad I finally did. I love the characterisation in these comics, best I've seen in ages. Magg ...more
This is really a key piece of American literature from the late twentieth century, at least in viewing that literature as a whole that is more than large enough to include the work being done in comics, cartoons, and/or graphic novels (pick your preferred term). Hernandez's Maggie and Hopey stories were always the standout thread in the rich tapestry of Love & Rockets, bringing the earliest stories together in a single volume like this is indispensable for appreciating the breathtaking scope ...more
Love and Rockets is one of those comics that I've been aware of for ages yet never read. I recommended them to my wife at some point, thinking she would enjoy them, and she went on a buying spree. That gave me the option to read them and it made me regret that I had overlooked these gems for so long, yet at the same time I was happy that I could read them in bunches now that the collected volumes are widely available.

Anyway, the first volume is probably the weirdest and in many ways it's my favo
Mar 06, 2008 Austin rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Everyone
Recommended to Austin by: Lyra Cyst
The Locas series (which this and two other books encompass) is a soap in Comic Form, primarily following two girls as they have various adventures that range from Sci-Fi insanity, to Punk Rock mythologies. The stories appeared in the book Love & Rockets, along-side work by his brother, who's stories were centered around a village called Palomar. In a way, you need both to really absorb either story, but reading Locas in three-volumes, all at once is also extremely rewarding.

I will be up fro
The early Hoppers stories are kind of like early Cerebus in that it's a lot different from what will come after, and that it feels like the creator is testing the waters and trying to figure out what works and needed some time to develop his winning formula. And though the early issues are different than the later ones, everything you like in the later ones is here, it's just that there's a lot of other stuff too. The punk rock soap opera element is present, but gets crowded out a bit by the sci ...more
Jeff Lanter
There are many reviews of this book or of the hardcover that sum up both what's great about Love and Rockets and what's not. I knew going in that the early sections would be a little rough, but I didn't really mind them. There is still a quality to the graphic novel that gives you the confidence to stick with this one to the end. As the Jaime gets better, you start to find yourself empathizing and falling in love with these characters even more. If you've ever liked punk/hardcore, have been frie ...more
Printable Tire
Reading Love and Rockets has always reminded me of the X-men cartoon from the 90’s, or, more obscurely, The Brown Hornet, the show-within-a-show Fat Albert and his cronies used to watch. Reading it made me feel like I was in someway getting ripped off, taken for a sucker, but in the best possible way. It felt like all the action had just happened in the last issue, and all the characters couldn’t possibly even remotely be understood without reading and buying countless back and future issues. Th ...more
Ray Hall
I enjoyed Jaime Hernandez Maggie the Mechanic.It is about Maggie and her friends, especially Hopey who she is having a relationship with,there are spaceships and Dinasaurs, remote islands and characters who turn up and add to the troubles already happening between Maggie and Rand Race who is a Prosolar mechanic and Maggie's boss.Maggie has a crush on Race but every time they try to get together a situation occurs and spoils everything.I think the stories were hit and miss,some better than others ...more
When I decided that it was finally time to tackle Love and Rockets, which had always seemed so overwhelming, I was relieved to find that Fantagraphics had released these nice collections (as well as publishing a useful “How to Read Love and Rockets” guide on their website). It took me a while to get into this volume, the first collecting Jaime Hernandez’s “Locas” stories. The first few stories, in which the author seems to be still finding his feet, were entertaining but didn’t really draw me in ...more
Sep 23, 2012 Jan rated it 3 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to Jan by: Heidi Stettner
This is the first of three Love and Rockets compilations that were given to me as a birthday gift this year. They deal with a couple of Latinas in a futuristic punk-inflected world where the English is studded with Spanish slang. Hopey is probably a lesbian and is in love with her roommate Maggie, a straight "girl mechanic" who works first on cars, then on rockets. Other characters recur; the most compelling to me is Izzy, a highly educated Goth Latina.

Drawn and scripted by Oxnard-born L.A.-dwel
Tayanna Daliese
I have a selection of comics I bought for a Gender in Comics class that I'm taking and everything up until now has been a dud. I loved the art, I loved the language and I loved the characters. Everything is thrown at you at once so it's kind of hard to keep up and the characters change their hair color so often (which is even more difficult since the whole book is in black and white) that I had to re-read certain sections to figure out who characters were, but overall this book was amazing. I lo ...more
Lena Tumasyan
Wierd mix of 80s punk, sci-fi, 50's style dress/clothes/men women, aliens, wrestlers, latin culture, politics, women doing unusual things. The art was pretty good - pretty clean, and simple black and white. But the plots were pretty random, like you wouldn't ACTUALLY expect things to turn out the way they turned out here. The artist LOVED drawing women's bodies, especially butts!! Definately showed that side more than others lol. But they were pretty nice butts. The faces and hairstyles were oft ...more
Jon Shanks
This is my second reading of this book and every page reminded me of why I loved it first time around. The storytelling is a little disjointed in places, but then this is a collection of several stories rather than one continuous narrative and more than made up for by the beautiful artwork. Last time I had intended to read on into the further adventure of these "Locas" and this read has definitely redoubled my resolve to do so.
Just finished reading the first half, and loved every bit.
The initial stories (one, two pages) set up the characters, but if you're new to this sort of comics, you may be deceived by "the end" at the end of each one. These are intros, chapters, etc, not complete, final stories. Continue reading and you are in for a treat. One of the best series ever.
Logan Plonski
Love and Rockets, where have you been all my life? My only complaint about this first volume is that the pacing is sometimes a little slow. Overall it's a super fun time, a slice of life magical realism with an 80s superhero comic aesthetic.
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Jaime and his brother Gilbert Hernández often write together under the name "Los Bros Hernandez".
More about Jaime Hernández...

Other Books in the Series

Love and Rockets (1 - 10 of 57 books)
  • Love and Rockets, Vol. 1: Music for Mechanics
  • Love and Rockets, Vol. 2: Chelo's Burden
  • Love and Rockets, Vol. 3: Las Mujeres Perdidas
  • Love and Rockets, Vol. 4: Tears from Heaven
  • Love and Rockets, Vol. 5: House of Raging Women
  • Love and Rockets, Vol. 6: Duck Feet
  • Love and Rockets, Vol. 7: The Death of Speedy
  • Love and Rockets, Vol. 8: Blood of Palomar
  • Love and Rockets, Vol. 9: Flies on the Ceiling
  • Love and Rockets, Vol. 10: X

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