Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “Following the Equator and Anti-Imperialist Essays” as Want to Read:
Following the Equator and Anti-Imperialist Essays
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

Following the Equator and Anti-Imperialist Essays

by
3.93  ·  Rating Details  ·  15 Ratings  ·  7 Reviews
In 1895, bankrupted by his investments in the doomed Paige typesetter and by the collapse of his publishing house, sixty-year-old Mark Twain was forced to embark on a world lecture tour to raise money to pay his growing debts. Following the Equator, Twain's final travel book, was the result.
His readers circumnavigate the globe with one of the world's most entertaining trav
...more
Paperback
Published March 6th 1997 by Oxford University Press, USA (first published 1905)
More Details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about Following the Equator and Anti-Imperialist Essays, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about Following the Equator and Anti-Imperialist Essays

This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 49)
filter  |  sort: default (?)  |  Rating Details
Allison
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Sid Hall
Nov 06, 2014 Sid Hall rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Mature Mark Twain. He never ceases to amaze.
Ben Schaffer
Nov 30, 2014 Ben Schaffer rated it really liked it
False
Read1000books
At 703 "readable" pages (I skipped the lengthy intro. and afterword by others), this is one of the longest books I've ever read straight through (at a chapter or so per day,it took me a month). But it was worth the trip. Twain is still quite witty in his old age (ignore his occasional rants about imperialistic British and U.S.) as he tours the Pacific, and the coasts of Australia, southern Asia, and Africa.
Sara K.
Apr 01, 2008 Sara K. is currently reading it  ·  review of another edition
Another dissertation text. I'm particularly interested by Twain's discussion of Australian history (my family lived there, minus me, for a bit, and my sister-in-law is Australian) and his ongoing discussion of race.
Ginny
Jan 01, 2014 Ginny rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Best ever Mark Twain!
Marc
Marc marked it as to-read
Jan 11, 2016
Sara
Sara marked it as to-read
May 01, 2015
Nathan
Nathan marked it as to-read
Apr 30, 2015
Thanos
Thanos marked it as to-read
Apr 12, 2015
Emma
Emma rated it really liked it
Apr 29, 2015
Stephen
Stephen marked it as to-read
Apr 08, 2015
Anthony
Anthony marked it as to-read
Feb 20, 2015
Anne
Anne marked it as to-read
Jan 01, 2015
Colleen
Colleen marked it as to-read
Jul 05, 2014
Martin
Martin added it
Feb 12, 2014
Elaine Mulligan
Elaine Mulligan marked it as to-read
Jan 27, 2014
John
John rated it really liked it
Dec 31, 2013
James
James rated it it was ok
Aug 10, 2013
Paul
Paul added it
Jul 17, 2013
Joshua
Joshua marked it as to-read
Jun 22, 2013
Illinois
Illinois marked it as to-read
Apr 21, 2013
Stephen Robertson
Stephen Robertson marked it as to-read
Mar 27, 2013
Stephen
Stephen marked it as to-read
Mar 17, 2013
Jimmy Rumple
Jimmy Rumple rated it liked it
Jun 06, 2013
Jim
Jim rated it it was amazing
Feb 08, 2013
Carla
Carla marked it as to-read
Jan 01, 2013
Scott Holmes
Scott Holmes marked it as to-read
Oct 10, 2012
Michael Strode
Michael Strode marked it as to-read
Jun 17, 2012
« previous 1 next »
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »
1244
Samuel Langhorne Clemens, better known by his pen name Mark Twain, was an American author and humorist. He is noted for his novels Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885), called "the Great American Novel", and The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876).

Twain grew up in Hannibal, Missouri, which would later provide the setting for Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer. He apprenticed with a printer. He also work
...more
More about Mark Twain...

Share This Book



“The timid man yearns for full value and asks for a tenth. The bold man strikes for double value and compromises on par.” 6 likes
“In both instances [a car coming out of the Himalayas and tobogganning] the sensation was pleasurable--intensely so; it was a sudden and immense exaltation, a mixed ecstasy of deadly fright and unimaginable joy. I believe that this combination makes the perfection of human delight.” 3 likes
More quotes…