The Nanjing Massacre: A Japanese Journalist Confronts Japan's National Shame (Studies of the Pacific Basin Institute)
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The Nanjing Massacre: A Japanese Journalist Confronts Japan's National Shame (Studies of the Pacific Basin Institute)

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3.77 of 5 stars 3.77  ·  rating details  ·  31 ratings  ·  3 reviews
Honda, an investigative journalist for Asahi Shimbun, shows in pitiless detail the horrors of the Japanese Army's march to and seizure and capture of Nanjing in December 1937. Unvarnished accounts of the testimony -- of Chinese victims and Japanese perpetrators -- to the rape and slaughter are juxtaposed with public relations announcements of the Japanese Army as printed i...more
Paperback, 400 pages
Published January 1st 1999 by East Gate Book
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Shomeret
Honda went to China and interviewed a great many survivors. He also had access to materials in Japanese such a war diaries by Japanese soldiers. He deals with these war crimes in context to show that this behavior was characteristic of the entire invasion, and not just the occupation of Nanjing. There were numerous atrocities committed en route to Nanjing. There were also many thousands of prisoners who were killed as a matter of policy. Honda quotes a 1933 textbook used by the Japanese Army In...more
Amanda
I can not honestly say that I liked this book (I had nightmares for a long time after I finished it), but if you want to understand what happened during the Japanese invasion of China this book will tell you. It is well done and extremely detailed (in truth a bit too detailed). Not for the weak of heart.
Ally Armistead
Wow. Katsuichi's meticulous exploration of Japan's cover-up of the Nanjing atrocities is on parallel, if not more powerful, than Iris Chang's. Both go right to the heart of the matter--the exposure of Japan's propaganda, denial, and re-shaping of the massacre--but what is so amazing about Katsuichi's treatment is that Honda himself risks his life for it. As a Japanese journalist, Katsuichi has had threats on his life from Japanese officials, having to hide himself (and his work) to stay alive. T...more
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