Unbound Feet: A Social History of Chinese Women in San Francisco
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Unbound Feet: A Social History of Chinese Women in San Francisco

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3.74 of 5 stars 3.74  ·  rating details  ·  57 ratings  ·  3 reviews
The crippling custom of footbinding is the thematic touchstone for Judy Yung's engrossing study of Chinese American women during the first half of the twentieth century. Using this symbol of subjugation to examine social change in the lives of these women, she shows the stages of "unbinding" that occurred in the decades between the turn of the century and the end of World...more
Paperback, 395 pages
Published November 15th 1995 by University of California Press (first published October 16th 1995)
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Kumar
In her book Unbound Feet, Judy Yung attempts to relay the challenges faced by Asian American women from the mid-19th to the mid-20th century. Yung impresses on the reader that Chinese women were limited by traditional Chinese patriarchy, American sexism, and racism. Through the process of Americanization, Chinese women were able to shed limitations imposed by ancient tradition. However, the issue of sexism and racism still remained, and both served to severely limit Chinese women’s complete inte...more
Taylor W.
Judy Yung’s Unbound Feet: A Social History of Women in San Francisco is an articulate work of historical review that synthesizes and utilizes various oral interviews, written histories (including old newspapers and legal documents), photographs, and Yung’s personal insight to shed light on the lives of Chinese women living in San Francisco from 1902 to 1945. She provides legitimate justification for her invested efforts, time, and expansive research in this book, reasoning that there are very f...more
tinabot
Read it in college and was rather disappointed but I don't remember specifically why.
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Professor Emeritus Judy Yung is a second-generation Chinese American born and raised in San Francisco Chinatown. She received her B.A. in English Literature and Chinese Language from San Francisco State College and her Master’s in Library Science and Ph.D. in Ethnic Studies from UC Berkeley.

Judy Yung headed the Chinatown Branch Library in San Francisco and the Asian Branch Library in Oakland and...more
More about Judy Yung...
The Adventures of Eddie Fung: Chinatown Kid, Texas Cowboy, Prisoner of War Chinese American Voices: From the Gold Rush to the Present Unbound Voices: A Documentary History of Chinese Women in San Francisco San Francisco's Chinatown (Images of America: California) Chinese Women of America: A Pictorial History

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