Let Sleeping Dogs Lie
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Let Sleeping Dogs Lie

3.15 of 5 stars 3.15  ·  rating details  ·  71 ratings  ·  16 reviews
When Johanna discovers that her grandfather's company--and her family's wealth--was founded on injustice due to the anti-Semitic laws of the Third Reich during the Nazi regime, she must make a life-altering decision.
Hardcover
Published October 1st 2007 by Front Street (first published 1940)
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Amanda
I like the concept of the plot, but somehow the way it is written does not urge me to keep turning pages. I can't put my finger on it...except for a couple of scenes that grabbed my attention, the word that comes to me is "plain". I just trudged steadily through the book, compared to a story like Octavian Nothing where I just can't put the book down unless I absoluteley have to.
Regina
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Molly
Aug 18, 2008 Molly rated it 4 of 5 stars
Shelves: ya
Can children be blamed for the actions of their parents, their grandparents, any of their ancestors? Even if they can't be held responsible, must they still shoulder the guilt of past behaviors? This is the premise behind this thought provoking novel of modern day Germany. Johanna discovers that her family's wealth and business success are all stolen, not earned as she once thought. Her family's clothing business used to belong to a Jewish family, conveniently run out by Nazi practices. This is...more
Jess
Sep 28, 2011 Jess marked it as to-read
Recommended to Jess by: CCB Book Club Book - Feb 09
I tried, I honestly tried, three or four times to get into this book. It's a decent story stuck in a meandering telling. I stuck with it for 50 pages for Nancy Pearl but then I was done.

The chapter where she writes the letters in my mind to that woman was good; I thought I was finally on board with the book but then it switched back to those long, descriptive paragraphs where nothing happens for page and pages and I start to skim and think about cleaning my apartment.

The thing is, if you even g...more
Erica - Bonner Springs Library
Oct 11, 2010 Erica - Bonner Springs Library rated it 3 of 5 stars
Recommended to Erica - by: CCB Book Group - February 2009
I had a hard time getting into this book. I'm not sure if it was the translation or what made it a bit of a difficult book to get through. For a serious issue book, I think it would have been a much better book if it was told in the first person. Being written in the third person omniscient made it hard for me to care about the main character as much as I might have if it was written in the first person.

Some of the serious issues regarding Johanna, the main character, and her family's history r...more
Erica
Mar 04, 2009 Erica rated it 3 of 5 stars
Recommended to Erica by: CCB Book Group - February 2009
I had a hard time getting into this book. I'm not sure if it was the translation or what made it a bit of a difficult book to get through. For a serious issue book, I think it would have been a much better book if it was told in the first person. Being written in the third person omniscient made it hard for me to care about the main character as much as I might have if it was written in the first person.

Some of the serious issues regarding Johanna, the main character, and her family's history r...more
Clay
Feb 15, 2008 Clay rated it 5 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: teens & adults-good crossover book
Recommended to Clay by: Karin, thank you
Complex, sophisticated and extraordinary. Sydney Taylor Honor Award Winner for Teen Readers. Starred review in January 2008 Bulletin of the Center for Chilldren's Books. On a class trip to Israel, eighteen-year-old German Johanna discovers her grandfather's Nazi past and that her family's business and wealth are the result of thefts, murders and lies--the "Sleeping Dogs" of the title. Pressler was the winner of the 2004 German Book Prize, among many other honors. Highly recommended.
Hadley pettit
I rated it 4 out of 5 because it was cunfusing. the books strengths are that its a very dramtic book so it pulls you in. the weaknesses of the book is that there were too many flashbacks when something else was going on. yes i would read another book by the same author because even though the book was cunfusing its still a good book and i wonder if his other books are good.
Katja
Nachdem das Buch drei Jahre im Regal stand (Ein Geschenk: "du kannst es toll im Unterricht einsetzen" - na toll!), hatte ich es dieses Jahr im Urlaub dabei. Es ist eine gute, unsentimentale Geschichte, deren Kern glaubwürdig und nicht überzogen ist. Ein gutes Buch, aber nicht nachhaltig genug, um davon viel zu erzählen. (gelesen 2012)
Rosanna
By presenting the troubles of German descendants, a different view to the much covered Holocaust is offered. This would be a great book to read in conjunction with any Holocaust book that presents the Jewish side of things. Some of the themes are understated, therefore I think it would be best read by those 14 and older.
Sara
An interesting book (similar to a German film of the '90s) about a teen girl who discovers her own family's involvement in Nazi politics and the persecution of the Jews and then ends up having to deal with her feelings of guilt and responsibility. It was actually better than I make it sound.
Deb
German girl finds out her grandfather's store had been a Jew's store in the 1930s and he had gotten it under less than right circumstances. I thought the book was too choppy. I found it hard to follow. maybe the translation? But i wanted to like it more.
Elizabeth
I thought this story was going to be much better than it actually was... Something was lacking, and it was confusing with all the flashbacks... It perhaps was the translation...
Susan P
Mar 25, 2008 Susan P marked it as to-read
Recommended at the March WASHYARG meeting. Holocaust issues story - girl's grandfather benefited from buying a Jewish store at a rock bottom price.
Sarah Kitchel
this book was boring too i read the first chapter and the epilogue and then i stopped
Rachel
This book is really depressing, but it's realistic and surprising
Sophie
Sophie marked it as to-read
Mar 06, 2014
Courtney
Courtney marked it as to-read
Jan 16, 2014
Paris
Paris marked it as to-read
Nov 14, 2013
Brenda Diamano
Brenda Diamano is currently reading it
Oct 25, 2013
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181311
German writer Mirjam Pressler is the author of several novels that have won awards in her native Germany and also received high praise from critics after being translated into English. In Malka and Halinka Pressler focuses on young Jewish protagonists who have been forced by fate to endure the Holocaust, while in Shylock's Daughter she returns readers to fifteenth-century Italy as she attempts to...more
More about Mirjam Pressler...
Malka Anne Frank: A Hidden Life Treasures from the Attic: the Extraordinary Story of Anne Frank's Family Bitterschokolade Shylock's Daughter

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