Old Mistresses: Women, Art and Ideology
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Old Mistresses: Women, Art and Ideology

3.88 of 5 stars 3.88  ·  rating details  ·  41 ratings  ·  2 reviews
How was it possible, by the later twentieth century, to have erased women as artists from art history so comprehensively that the idea of 'the artist' was exclusively masculine? Why was this erasure more radical in the twentieth century than ever before? Why is everything that compromises greatness in art coded as 'feminine'? Has the feminist critique of Art History yet ef...more
Paperback, 224 pages
Published July 30th 2013 by I. B. Tauris (first published February 12th 1982)
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Frightful_elk
May 02, 2009 Frightful_elk rated it 3 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: artists
I feel like a lot of this book has already been absorbed into art culture, however I think it well worth reading in order to be concious of a lot of the issues they speak about. I found the most interesting thing in this book the idea of how we digest art - through monographs and key artists. Hopefully by following the course of integration they recommend, men and women can achieve equal footing.
Korri
Published in 1981, this feminist history of art explores art history, the scholarly discipline wrapped up in ideology that privileges men over women and certain types of creativity over others. The text builds on the works that came before it. Parker and Pollock do not seek to uncover the biographies of hidden women artists or to demonstrate an idea of women's progressive struggle against great odds to be accepted into the canon of art history. Instead they are interested in how 'women have part...more
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