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Wah-to-Yah and the Taos Trail: or Prairie travel and scalp dances, with a look at Los Rancheros from Muleback and the Rocky Mountain Campfire
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Wah-to-Yah and the Taos Trail: or Prairie travel and scalp dances, with a look at Los Rancheros from Muleback and the Rocky Mountain Campfire

3.92  ·  Rating Details ·  25 Ratings  ·  7 Reviews
In the bright morning of his youth Lewis H. Garrard traveled into the wild and free Rocky Mountain West and left us this fresh and vigorous account, which, says A. B. Guthrie, Jr., contains in its pages "the genuine article-the Indian, the trader, the mountain man, their dress, and behavior and speech and the country and climate they lived in."

On September 1, 1846, Garrard
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Paperback, 320 pages
Published June 15th 1972 by University of Oklahoma Press
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Fabian
Jun 16, 2016 Fabian rated it liked it
It is unfortunate that Susan Shelby Magoffin did not edit her diary, for in comparison, Lewis Hector Garrard’s narrative, a parallel trek down the Santa Fe trail, is actually enticing--a more satisfying and literary read, and less a cotillion of names and household items. Her account has a disagreeable immediacy, no reflections nor personal retroaction give it any type of edginess or authority. The voice is dull and the reader must try hard to read between the lines, while Wah-to-Yah is ...more
David Shapiro
Mar 05, 2014 David Shapiro rated it it was amazing
This book will pass most people by without much of a notice. They may see it at the gift shop of Bent's Old Fort or perhaps even at the Museum of the Fur Trade in Pinedale, Wyoming, but for whatever reason, it will be glanced over for another title. That's a shame. This book should be read in schools. It was written by a fresh American voice during a time period that is usually weighed down with racism and contempt for Mexicans, Indians and French Canadians. Garrard is having the adventure of ...more
Bob
May 31, 2014 Bob rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: John Halliday
Recommended to Bob by: in de Voto's 1846
Shelves: western
Garrard began his adventure at 17 and his account, published at 21, breathes youthful exuberance:
"On Friday the ninth, the sky was unspotted, save by hastily-fleeting clouds, and, as the rising sun loomed over the Taos Mountain,t he bright rays, shining on the yellow and white mud houses, reflected cheerful hues, while the shades of the toppling peaks receding from the plain beneath, drew within themselves." (p. 219)
The narrative is remarkable for the descriptions of dress and customs of Mexic
...more
Wes Redfield
Dec 28, 2009 Wes Redfield rated it it was amazing
A remarkable book written by a seventeen year-old from Cincinnati who ventured west during the Mexican War. Garrard writes of leaders, entrepreneurs, mountain men, and his role in hanging participants in the Taos Revolt against American occupation. His line about how can a man be a traitor in his native land is haunting. The Apache term in the title means Breasts of the World, the former name of the Spanish Peaks in southern Colorado. Another victim of civilization.
James Prothero
Feb 05, 2015 James Prothero rated it it was amazing
One of the few first hand accounts of the Rocky Mountains in 1846, by a teenage boy who takes a year to wander down the Santa Fe Trail and hang out with Mountain Men. He also witnesses the trial and execution of Mexican fighters who retook Taos briefly during the Mexican War. Garrand is a good witness and reporter of attitudes and speech.

Bob
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Trent Rock
Apr 19, 2010 Trent Rock rated it it was amazing
Recommends it for: historians
Great 1st person narrative on the Taos fur trade industry.
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Ralph Estes
Pretty good, 17-year-old's acct. up & down Santa Fe Trail
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From Wikipedia: Garrard, christened Hector Lewis Garrard, was the son of a prominent family in Cincinnati, Ohio On 1 Sept 1846, Garrard, 17 years old, joined a caravan in Westport Landing, Missouri to travel along the Santa Fe Trail to New Mexico. He stopped off at Bent’s Fort for two months and continued on to Taos with a company of Mountain Men to avenge the death of Charles Bent in the Taos ...more
More about Lewis Hector Garrard...

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