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The Coming of the Spirit of Pestilence: Introduced Infectious Diseases and Population Decline Among Northwest Indians, 1774-1874
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The Coming of the Spirit of Pestilence: Introduced Infectious Diseases and Population Decline Among Northwest Indians, 1774-1874

really liked it 4.0  ·  Rating Details ·  1 Rating  ·  2 Reviews
In the late 1700s, when Euro-Americans began to visit the Northwest Coast, they reported the presence of vigorous, diverse cultures--among them the Tlingit, Haida, Kwakwaka'wakw (Kwakiutl), Nuu-chah-nulth (Nootka), Coast Salish, and Chinookans--with a population conservatively estimated at over 180,000. A century later only about 35,000 were left. The change was brought ...more
Hardcover, 428 pages
Published November 1st 1999 by University of Washington Press (first published October 1999)
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Valerie
I think this is the book I read, though not in this edition.

If so, it's severely inadequate--but, given the dearth of other sources, it'll have to serve.

I particularly resented the slander against people who had, by and large, never encountered infectious diseases before. Treating non-communicable ailments in the sweat lodges is often quite effectual. And how could people who'd never had need for quarantines develop the concept in less than a generation? Particularly when everybody they knew was
...more
Dan
Jun 03, 2014 Dan rated it really liked it
Shelves: 2014
Useful survey of the Pacific Northwest in the 1700s and 1800s, and perhaps the most detailed possible study on an Old World/New World encounter. Well done. My only critique is that it could have used a bit more on the biology of certain diseases. He sticks largely to the sourcing on this rather than incorporating more relevant scientific research. (Example: although he speculates that multiple infections may have been a factor in certain instances, he doesn't look at the biology in much detail. ...more
Jbondandrews
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