The Death of Innocents: An Eyewitness Account of Wrongful Executions
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The Death of Innocents: An Eyewitness Account of Wrongful Executions

4.15 of 5 stars 4.15  ·  rating details  ·  318 ratings  ·  55 reviews
From the author of the national bestseller Dead Man Walking comes a brave and fiercely argued new book that tests the moral edge of the debate on capital punishment: What if we’re executing innocent men? Two cases in point are Dobie Gillis Williams, an indigent black man with an IQ of 65, and Joseph Roger O’Dell. Both were convicted of murder on flimsy evidence (O’Dell’s p...more
Paperback, 336 pages
Published January 24th 2006 by Vintage (first published 2004)
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BeckyTalbot
Apr 23, 2008 BeckyTalbot rated it 4 of 5 stars
Recommended to BeckyTalbot by: Johanna Harper
The two cases Prejean narrates are very compelling, especially the case of Joseph O'Dell, who was very likely innocent, but whose quest to prove this was blocked at every turn. I have a hard time wrapping my mind around the injustices of the US courts, and if Prejean did not supply such irrefutable evidence, I really would be tempted to think such things could never happen. Sister Helen's narratives and her insight into the workings of the justice system are more convincing than her moral argume...more
Kate
Sr. Helen Prejean openly and honestly presents a case for human dignity in regards to the death penalty. Through three main case studies, she demonstrates how our court system is rife with failures, and mistakes that are repeatedly made.

I was honored to meet Sr. Helen in 2005 after performing in the stage version of "Dead Man Walking'. This was a strong introduction into the issues that this book presents. The play was the most moving piece of theatre of have ever been involved in. In playing t...more
AuthorsOnTourLive!
The Death of Innocents: An Eyewitness Account of Wrongful Executions is a brave and fiercely argued book that tests the moral edge of the debate on capital punishment: What if we're executing innocent men? As Sister Helen Prejean recounts several cases of innocent men being executed, and takes us through their terrible last moments, she brilliantly dismantles the legal and religious arguments that have been used to justify the death penalty.

We met Sister Prejean when she visited the Tattered Cov...more
Kelly
this is about 2 people targeted and murdered by the u.s. & sister helen prejeans relationships with them. the second part is her breaking down the politics and racism behind the system ive come to understand as the death machine.

"inside my soul i'm trying to find a rock to stand on."

"I used to think heaven was a far off other world for souls that had been seperated from bodies. Now I believe that life is a continuum, that dying and living are like knitting and purling, all woven together,...more
Jennifer
This is a tough read. It's tough because it's a true and terrifying account of our justice system. I dare you to go with the sister for the first two chapters on her journey accompanying two innocent men to the death chambers... Then to chapter three called "The Machinery of Death." It's not a light read, y'all, but it's made me go back to our Constitution. I want to know my rights.
Ajgoebertus
Again, Sister Helen Prejean shares her experiences and her convictions in a beautifully personal and compelling manner. The reality of the injustice both men experience (Dobie Gillis Williams & Joseph O'Dell) is painfully evident. Their stories are heartbreaking. I appreciated learning about her journey as a Catholic nun and about her influence in the shift in Catholic thought about capital punishment as well as her role in encouraging the Pope to clarify the Church's teaching (this appeared...more
Simon Fletcher
Sister Helen Prejean's continuing journey through the death houses of the United States. If you've read Dead Man Walking then you will find some of this a bit of a repeat though there is enough fresh material to make it a worthwhile read. That said it lacks the vibrancy and impact of Dead Man Walking.
Michelle
Wow. This one hit close to home for me as both a Catholic and as a forensic science student. Sister Helen Prejean recounts to stories of two men on death row - men that she believes to be innocent. She takes the moral issues behind the death penalty to a new level, dissecting both cases and uncovering all of the injustices both men had to endure. She takes apart religious arguments that "favor" the death penalty, providing her own religious arguments against the death penalty. This a powerful, b...more
Loretta Loebs
"What does The Lord require of you but to do justice, to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God." Micah 6:8
Kela
What a hard book to read! Even the staunchest death row advocates have to admit executing an innocent person is a travesty. Prejean follows two men to their deaths, all the while providing compelling evidence of their innocence. I have no doubt one of the men she followed was innocent. The other inmate's innocence is not as cut and dry, although it is obvious he did not get a fair shake through the court system. Prejean also does a wonderful job of pointing out inconsistencies in how the death p...more
Diana
This book was the UNC Summer Reading Choice for incoming freshman a few years ago. My book group chose to read it last month and some of the discussion ranged around how we feel about the death penalty and the challenges to our feelings now that the man accused of killing the UNC Student Body President last year is going to be tried as a death penalty case. Eve Carson was opposed to the death penalty and her parents have said that they are not in favor of the death penalty for her killers.
Stacy
Excellent account of two innocent men who were executed. She provides quite a bit of evidence from the cases, which leave little doubt that these men could not be guilty. She provides well researched-factual information in the final section of the book to illustrate just how biased the judicial system is against racial minorities and the poor. An excellent read on a topic people know little about. I highly recommend it.
Rachelle
Lots of good points and I learned a lot, but the second half is pretty dry.
Christina
I met Sister Helen a few years ago and bought this book. Just now found time to read it. Her work is an interesting blend of hard facts and personal experience. She heavily critiques the justice system and goes after politicians for their support of an unjust system.

I learned some new facts and am especially concerned that our lawmakers and judicial system continue to support legal homicide.
Lynette
I have been generally against the death penalty for many years, but could never really put to words concretely why I felt this way. Until reading this book, that is. Prejean lays out numerous arguments for eliminating the death penalty, some from a sociopolitical standpoint, always from a moral/ethical standpoint. Anyone with any sort of interest in social justice should read this book.
Chelsea
Not a fun read, and not one I would comfortably say I "liked", but a worthwhile read. I don't have much to say, because I'm the proverbial choir Sister Prejean is preaching to, but even though I was put off by the frequent religious arguement a against the death penalty, I still think it's a disconcerting insight into a process that many of us would prefer to never think about.
Pixismiler
Excellent book that I think every human being should read. I worked on death row at the Louisiana State Penitentiary at Angola as a social worker and had the task of counseling an inmate who was executed. Four years later and I still remember every detail. This book conveys every feeling I have on the death penalty. When are we going to stop being barbarians? MUST READ!!!
Diane
I admit that I could not continue to read this book. It is well written and intriguing but I am already an avid anti-death penalty person and could not stomach reading about innocent people who are put to death because of our system that is based on procedure not on justice. I still have given it a high score because it is well written and deserves to be read.
Newhamshter
I love how Ms. Prejean contrasted her first book, Dead Man Walking: An Eyewitness Account of the Death Penalty in the United States, with this one: The Death of Innocents: An Eyewitness Account of Wrongful Executions. Even though people kill, I don't believe that killers should in turn be killed - especially not by our Government.
Kara
Dead Man Walking (which I also highly recommend) explains why capital punishment is morally wrong, this goes a step further and without taking away from her first book/experience explains that innoncent people are victims of capital punishment in this country and the system needs an overhaul. Everyone should read it.
Lyn
This is a major issue to me. I am strongly against capital punishment. Sister Helen's books helped to shape my opinion. I've read essays and books from both points of view, and I suppose you could say both sides are biased in their writing, but Sister Helen became biased after research. So did I.
Madonna Analla
This is an excellent book that I recommend to everyone, pro and against the death penalty, because it gives you some very real issues to think about. One of the huge things is the effects of the death penalty on everyone involved in carrying executions out. This is a very important book.
Jeff Lacy
Edifying account of the machinery of government assassinating its own people furtively in a supposed "civilized" fashion by putting them to sleep like a family's devoted Golden Retriever. Should be read contemporaneously with Camus' essay on the guillotine.
Alexandra
I heard about this book when Sr. Prejean gave an interview on NPR and it sounded so interesting I had to run and get it right away. It chronicles the stories of a few people on death row who all have compelling evidence for their innocence...
Michelle
An important read for anyone uneducated about the death penalty and its abuses, failures, and "pernicious effect on society", and a good reminder for those already educated on it with vivid accounts of eyewitness execution of innocent people.
Mary Steidler
Thought provoking. Prejean claims to "prove" the innocence of 2 executed men but doesn't really succeed. She does succeed in raising a lot of questions and showing the important of class and money in having a good legal defense, thought.
David
A powerful, compelling read about the terrible injustice of capital punishment in the United States.
Amy
Apr 08, 2011 Amy added it
Started this but then decided to put it back on the shelf for later. The stories are heart-wrenching, especially with all the mess with Troy Davis. I will pick it up again after Troy's case is resolved.
Shannon
Aug 10, 2008 Shannon is currently reading it
Reading the follow up to Dead Man Walking by Sr. Prejean. Jason saw her speak at a Legal Services fundraiser and was totally inspired. I must say, the books are shocking and have changed my way of thinking...
Kathy
May 13, 2012 Kathy rated it 5 of 5 stars
Recommended to Kathy by: Theresa
The author uses an elegant blend of storytelling and statistics, secular and non-secular reasoning, and legal and moral arguments, to oppose the continued use of the death penalty in the United States.
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Sister Helen Prejean, CSJ (b. April 21, 1939, Baton Rouge, Louisiana) is a vowed Roman Catholic religious sister, one of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Medaille, who has become a leading American advocate for the abolition of the death penalty.

Her efforts began in New Orleans, Louisiana, in 1981, through a correspondence she maintained with a convicted murderer, Elmo Patrick Sonnier, who was sentenc...more
More about Helen Prejean...
Dead Man Walking: The Eyewitness Account of the Death Penalty That Sparked a National Debate I Am Troy Davis Rescuing Regina: The Battle to Save a Friend from Deportation and Death A Different Kind of Cell: The Story of a Murderer Who Became a Monk Dead Man Walking: The Shooting Script

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