Lord of Mountains
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Lord of Mountains (Emberverse #9)

3.69 of 5 stars 3.69  ·  rating details  ·  948 ratings  ·  120 reviews
"[A] gifted author,"* S.M. Stirling created a fascinating neo-medieval world in his Novels of the Change where the remnants of humanity struggle to survive in a post-technological environment. Now, the "New York Times" bestselling epic continues as a king faces a challenge beyond the battlefield... "
Rudi Mackenize, now Artos the First, High King of Montival, and his allie...more
ebook, 336 pages
Published September 1st 2012 by Roc
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Kris
The ninth book of the series and I really felt that this was written just to extend the series. There was no real major character development or changes, the plot wasn't substantially advanced, and there really wasn't any world building of any kind as well. I wonder if Stirling added this in at the behest of the publisher because it really seems to be a three chapter story stretched into a 300+ page novel. I know he added to the series length when for years he said he would write the ending by n...more
Becky Weaver
Once I walked my puppy through a Fiesta Market parking lot, and she found a tortilla on the ground. It had been run over several times; maybe that made it even more delicious. Thereafter, every time we passed Fiesta Market, that dog checked the tortilla spot.

I read each installment of the Emberverse series for much the same reason. The first few books were so fun. The new ones are clogged with backstory and are probably generated via Emberverse Mad Libs, fleshed out by an intern living in S. M....more
Josh
These books are not getting any better. The author seems to have taken a cue from songs of ice and fire and become much more descriptive about food, dress environments etc. the problem is, it's just not that interesting. It feels like added drivel in order to stretch out the series to god knows what end. But I, the faithful reader will soldier on. I am too invested in the outcome and want to know how it ends. Lets be real though, it's not like they are going to lose. I jut want to know how they...more
Melody
Arrrrggh. That's my review in a nutshell.

This is book number 9 in this series, book 6 in the Rudi-centered series. It is entirely masturbatory on Stirling's part, gah. A minimum of four times he told me that Eric and Signe are fraternal twins in their mid-forties. Yes, yes. I know. Because I read the first 8 books in which Signe and Eric are main characters- and oddly enough, they were twins in all those books too.

Mostly what happens in this book is that each character from the earlier books wa...more
Alex
SPOILERS.....
I couldn't wait to read it but by the end I just wished it would have concluded the story. The wonderful characters seemed to make cameo appearances with Stirling mostly reminding us who they were rather than developing them more. There's a large battle but not much resolution and by the end I felt like I was reading more of a travelogue than the story I began nine(?) installments ago. This lacked much of the tension and daring exploits of earlier books. Besides Rudi's horse, all th...more
Jen
Damn you, S.M. Stirling! You're like that charming boy who always stands a girl up on dates but then comes by with the best apology and the sexy smile and the girl winds up accepting him back, even though she knows it's going to break her heart again.

Why no, I have no experience of this at all.

*Ahem*, the reason I use that analogy is that Stirling's Emberverse is fascinating. The first six books were highly entertaining and interesting, especially to me the medievalist. I mean, the High Middle A...more
Sarah (Tail-Kinker)
I continue to love this universe, but I am getting tired of waiting for something to happen in the last few books!

To me, this book and the two just prior to it (Tears of the Sun and the High King of Montival) could easily have been combined into one larger novel.

If you're hacking up the happenings in the plot to make more money & stretch these series out, shame on you! I continue to be an avid reader and buy print books both new and used, but if authors keep churning out novels that really...more
Julia
Sep 17, 2012 Julia rated it 3 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: fans of the series
Shelves: fantasy-series
When I read the first novel of the Change Dies the Fire I couldn't put it down. The plot was exciting, the characters were vibrant and I appreciated the sympathetic treatment of Wicca. The sense of wonder and real worldbuilding has continued throughout the series (this is book #9) but the most recent books, The Tears of the Sun and Lord of Mountains have bogged down.

In previous books Rudi Mackenzie and a growing group of friends and companions travelled from the west coast (the region formerly k...more
Chris Bauer
I've been a long-time reader of this series and have enjoyed every one. In the latest book "Lord of Mountains" the author goes to painstaking detail in describing the practical challenges facing the new generation of post Change heroes.

This book seemed to be just a little different from his prior work. In the previous novels he pays great attention to detail of what we take as mundane tasks, such as baking, brewing, carving, and similar skills and turns the act of making a loaf of bread into a m...more
Geoffrey
After the previous novel, The Tears of the Sun: A Novel of the Change (Change Series), I wasn't sure if the final two books in the series was going to end on a stale note. This book has gone a long way to renew the thrill and the magic of the first 6 or so novels. It finally brings the war with the Church Universal and Triumphant to a head and concentrates on the formation of the fledgling High Kingdom of Montival. There is plenty of war craft and plenty of state craft to be found. There is also...more
Chris
This book, like the rest of the later part of the Emberverse series, seems to suffer from a serious identity crisis.

For the first few novels after Dies the Fire, you can tell that S. M. Stirling had a strict purpose- that is, to outline how communities and governments would grow out of a world without power. And, honestly, those books are incredibly entertaining; the growth of towns, cultures, and religions in the ruins of the old world make for an excellent read. However, at a certain point, St...more
Leons1701
You know how a football game lasts 3 hours and then all the post game coverage is even longer sometimes? That's a bit how this book feels, the first half is a "murthering great battle". Just one battle, mind you. The second half is post-battle reactions. I don't want to say nothing happens in the second half of the book, because some of the revelations are quite significant in setting up further books in the series, but it almost feels that way at times. Fortunately, Stirling is constitutionally...more
Barbara Ghylin
I cannot wait for this book to come out. I have read the entire series more than once. I have always compaired it a King Author and the round table type quest. What a story!!
I finally had the chance to pick this one up at the bookstore. ( Work is very overrated) So far I am really enjoying it. One of my favarite charactors has died, but that is be expected.
I finished this one earlier today. Things are starting to come together for Rudi and his allies. It is more and more a Round Table Quest.
Hrairoorah
I loved this series when it started but it has lost most of it's charm. I find myself reading each new book almost as if I have to. I can no longer connect with the characters and I really don't care what happens to them. The science fiction aspects of the story have been taken over by the fantasy elements, to the detriment of the story.
Jason Taylor
This is the worst book in the entire series. It just felt hurried through and it turned out to be kind of anticlimactic. Still, I enjoy being immersed in this tale - I just hope S.M. Stirling goes back to the basics!
Leggypeggy
I love most of his books....but this was a waste of time and money and an insult to his followers.
David Galloway
The thing I love about S.M. Stirling is that every September a new Emberverse novel comes out like clockwork. I wish GRR Martin would take note of this.

If you haven't read the original Emberverse trilogy (starting with Dies the Fire) or the current series (starting with The Sunrise Lands) you'll want to read those way before this one. This is your last chance to avoid spoilers.

There aren't any real epiphanies in Lord of the Mountains--if you enjoy the series you'll quickly tear through this sec...more
Kris
I liked it, but it felt more like the last chapter of the previous book with an extended afterword. That being said it was an interesting structure for the book to begin with a climactic battle that spans the first half of the book. I suspect that I would have been happier with this book if I had read it immediately following reading the previous volume instead of a year later. This may have more to do with publishing limitations/conventions than the authors intent. Anyway anyone who has enjoyed...more
Joe
I have enjoyed this series, but this installment seems to be go nowhere in its development. Most of the book seems to be a recap of the main characters from previous books, and they come off looking flat. Long-time readers know who the characters are, they don't need to be reminded. Newer readers will likely be confused anyway, unless they go back to the first books in the series. Please move on with the story!
Paul Mccollom
Was looking forward to the next installment of this series which started out so strong, but was disappointed. It seems as thought the author was either tired of the storyline himself or was rushing the job because it really seemed as though he "phoned it in". I saw the word cote-hardie so many times I felt like I was in some medieval version of Project Runway.
Larisa
3.5
Back on track, solid pace, excellent hints of things to come with subtle references to past books. Appreciate the deft touch working the Other Wordliness, along with religious tolerance, viewpoints and perspectives.
Accepting the final trilogy is going to be shorter books, with a focus on state craft, war craft, topped with solid pieces of Other.
Amy
I have story-itis or I would have stopped reading these a year ago. Oh my god. . . finish the story. And if it can't be finished? At least close this arc. I want to be done for ever and ever and ever.
Chris Clark
Aren't we just wandering around describing things at this point...? Let's get back to the drama and actual story/character development.
Gordon Gammell
The worst book of the Novels of the Change. It appears this may be part of a larger work that was cut down for size. The Change story has now become a modern medieval tale. There is another book following this that I hope ends this series. The mystery of The Change is gone, though elements do appear, the story doesn't have the impact of the first books. I hope Stirling moves on to something else with a fresh idea.

As to the story told in this book it is about a battle. The thing is on the scale o...more
Pam Shelton-anderson
OK...a battle though not THE battle...mystic visions and then... and then... and then
John Patrick
I liked this book. I'll admit it didn't seem like it had as much plot meat as previous entries, however it was nowhere near as over bloated as the last book The Tears of the Sun. If you trimmed the literary fat from that book, and this book, then combined them I think it would have been a much more cohesive book. Despite that I still liked Lord of Mountains: A Novel of the Change. I'll admit it, my inner fanboy is a sucker for a battle, and this book definitely delivered. But I feel like if S.M....more
Loraine
Mr. Stirling kept me entertained. There were enough passages grounded in the daily artifacts of a post apocalyptic land to satisfy my interest in the telling of the tale of Rudi MacKenzie's ascendancy to the throne as Artos, King of Montival. I actually enjoy Stirling's love of detail, even when he describes a bowyer's skills or some arcane Buddhist ritual or coats of arms. But . . . my least favorite elements, long passages about military conflict and the consequent slaughter of thousands, happ...more
Joy
The reviews here and on Amazon had me hold off on getting this installment until I had a Christmas gift card, so I just read the book this past week. To my surprise, however, I really enjoyed this book (more than most, it seemed) and I flew through it in just a few days. Perhaps I like world-building and description more than some, and I also really appreciated the detail and strategy of the battle that takes up the majority of the book.

This is a book of a battle, with the main battle (admittedl...more
Dan Pepper
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Rena McGee
One thing I will say right off about Lord of Mountains; at least it does not jump around all over the place the way Tears of the Sun did. (Do not worry the layout is not the only good thing about the book. I just really hated the way the last book had been set up.) This book mostly focuses on the first major battle of the war and the politicking afterward. Then the book trails off into pseudo-mystical Arthurian legendry as Rudi and Mathilde have a crowning ceremony and vigil during which they ha...more
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Stephen Michael Stirling is a French-born Canadian-American science fiction and fantasy author. Stirling is probably best known for his Draka series of alternate history novels and the more recent time travel/alternate history Nantucket series and Emberverse series.

More about S.M. Stirling...
Dies the Fire (Emberverse, #1) The Protector's War (Emberverse, #2) A Meeting at Corvallis (Emberverse, #3) Island in the Sea of Time (Nantucket, #1) The Sunrise Lands (Emberverse, #4)

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