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Untidy Origins: A Story of Woman's Rights in Antebellum New York
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Untidy Origins: A Story of Woman's Rights in Antebellum New York

3.68  ·  Rating Details ·  31 Ratings  ·  3 Reviews
On a summer day in 1846--two years before the Seneca Falls convention that launched the movement for woman's rights in the United States--six women in rural upstate New York sat down to write a petition to their state's constitutional convention, demanding "equal, and civil and political rights with men." Refusing to invoke the traditional language of deference, ...more
Paperback, 240 pages
Published April 18th 2005 by University of North Carolina Press
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Jessica Zu
Aug 04, 2011 Jessica Zu rated it really liked it
This is an assigned reading. My professor wrote this book:) I have to admit that she is a good historian. Her underlying principle for this book (at least one of them) is that intellectual ideas/breakthroughs are not created from vacuum or in isolation. Like what Buddha taught, everything is conditioned co-arising and co-disappearing. Everything is situated, embedded and entangled in a context, a social fabric, a particular space and time. Even space and time is not a simple, pure and solid ...more
Hubert
Very well-written and well-researched essay on the role of 6 upstate NY women in starting the conversation on women's suffrage 2 years before the Seneca Falls convention. Ginzberg explores what citizenry means, and touches upon themes of gender, political rights, and property in the new nation to advance a history of an American episode not heretofore known well to general readers.

The text is written in a detailed nuanced academic language, but it's worth going through multiple readings.
Sue
Mar 12, 2008 Sue rated it really liked it
Recommended to Sue by: Advisor
Shelves: history
An academic book (with fantastic footnotes) but it reads like one for a more general audience. Ginzburg argues that the first calls for the ballot did not happen in Seneca Falls (1848) but instead in 1846 in the form of a petition to the state of NY signed by 6 women.
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