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The Soldier's Load and the Mobility of a Nation
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The Soldier's Load and the Mobility of a Nation

3.76  ·  Rating Details ·  83 Ratings  ·  3 Reviews
Paperback, 0 pages
Published June 28th 1980 by Marine Corp Assn Bookstore (first published June 1980)
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Calebva
Feb 18, 2009 Calebva rated it liked it
This book looks at what a soldier carries on his back when going into battle and how it affects his performance. It takes a spartan approach to the fighting load, noting many examples of past armies who carried unnecessary weight which affected their combat effectiveness. Reminds me of my grandpa telling me how he had to walk uphill both ways in the snow.
Andrew
Mar 18, 2010 Andrew rated it liked it
Shelves: military
Gen. Marshall basically repeats the same maxim in several different ways in this book. BL don't overload your men with shit they don't need. Some interesting vignettes though.
Wachlin007 Hotmail
Feb 23, 2008 Wachlin007 Hotmail rated it really liked it
This book addresses what should be an infantryman's basic load. It addresses a lot of logistical issues that most people don't think about. I thought it was very informative.
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S.L.A. Marshall (full name, Samuel Lyman Atwood Marshall) served in World War I and then embarked in a career in journalism. In World War II, he was chief combat historian in the Central Pacific (1943) and chief historian for the European Theater of Operations (1945). He authored some 30 books about warfare, including Pork Chop Hill: The American Fighting Man in Action, The River and the Gauntlet ...more
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“Fundamentally only two great novelties have come out of recent warfare. They are: (1) mechanical vehicles, which relieve the Soldier of equipment hitherto carried by him; (2) air supply, which relieves the vehicle of the road.” 4 likes
“The bayonet is not a chemical agent the mere possession of it will not make men one whit more intrepid than they are by nature. Nor will any amount of bayonet training have such an effect. All that may be said of such training is that, like the old Butts Manual, its values derive only from the physical exercise. It conditions the mind only in the degree that it hardens the muscles and improves health.

The bayonet needs now to be re-evaluated by our Army solely on what it represents as an instrument for killing and protection. That should be done in accordance with the record, and without the slightest sentiment So considered, the bayonet will be as difficult to justify as the type of slingshot with which David slew Goliath.”
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