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Dhammapada: Annotated & Explained

4.28 of 5 stars 4.28  ·  rating details  ·  12,668 ratings  ·  364 reviews
This cornerstone Buddhist scripture, containing all of Buddhism's key teachings, is presented in an accessible edition that offers the complete text with facing-page commentary that explains all the names, terms, and references, in addition to giving insight into the text. Original.
Paperback, 129 pages
Published February 1st 2002 by Skylight Paths Publishing (first published -500)
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Diamond Cowboy
The Dhammapada is a collection of Budist writings. These explain their chor beliefs. I found this a very intreaguing read. I am a Christian but I find it very informative to study other people's belief system. The Budist's beliefs are based primarily on love but it has a very practical side of how to conduct one's life here on earth. It does not speak to much of the life her-after. I plan to study further into the Budist religion to gain a more informative opinion. I would recommend every one st ...more
Mar 29, 2007 tighe added it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: everyone
Very reflective and wholesome moral truths for living, quite a fresh read in the world of inconsequential candy reads. While one might not agree with every Buddhist principle for living, as I myself don't, the general truths that you pick up and contemplate throughout the day are hard to escape. Easy and quick, yet full of substance and worthy of review time and again.
Roxana Saberi
Just reread this. Little and big gems of wisdom throughout.
It's mostly just an assortment of platitudes.


Ch. VI, 78.

>>"Let one not associate
With low persons, bad friends.
But let one associate
With noble persons, worthy friends."

Ch. VIII, stanza 100.

>>"Though a thousand the the statements,
With words of no avail,
Better is a single word of welfare,
Having heard which, one is pacified."

Ch. XXI, stanza 290.

>>"If by sacrificing a limited pleasure
An extensive pleasure one would see,
Let the wise one beholding extensive pleasure,
Thou shalt not live combined with no soup for you. I feel compelled to say more inane things, but restraint is foremost in my mind after reading the Dhammapada. It gets a low rating because I didn't learn anything new.

My favourite verses:

#50: One should not have regard for the bad deeds of others, nor the things done and left undone by others, but only for the things done and left undone by oneself.

#204: He who does not exert himself at the time of exertion, who though young and strong has com
Arun Divakar
There are books to be read and books to be comprehended. The second class is like learning to ride a bike : you climb on it to fall down & you keep repeating the gesture until at least shakily you can move forth a few feet unaided. What is contained in this book while at a first read is absurdly simple in its spartan-ness is a very difficult set of guidelines to live with.

The inspiration to know more about the Buddha was an unlikely source, a little trinket I bought. It was a resemblance of
Yasiru (reviews will soon be removed and linked to blog)
A wide-ranging and systematic sampling of Buddhist teachings, particularly in Theravada Buddhism, coming as it does from the Khuddaka Nikaya of the Pali Canon (see the external links section for valuable resources, including the Access to Insight collection of translated material). Highly economical and eminently accessible, these verses are indispensible in addressing the myriad misapprehensions and misrepresentations of concepts like karma, detachment, emptiness, et al. often made in casual la ...more
A re-read, this time in English translation. I got the Oxford version, because its form looked good in Amazon review (also its introduction is very clear and interesting; its explanatory notes are very useful too, very clear).

I think I got more out of this this time, maybe a few years really changed things. I'm not a Buddhist, not believing in reincarnation for example, but even so I got a lot of enjoyment and inspiration out of this. It's a slim volume, so it can be read quickly, but it can als
Ibrahim Saad
كان عندي حب إستطلاع إني أعرف اللي بداخل الكتاب ده .. خصوصاً إن عنوان الكتاب "الدامابادا كتاب بوذا المقدس" جذّاب جداً
واني قرأت بعض مقولات منسوبة لبوذا ..
لكن الكتاب برأيي .. سطحي او أن عنوانه كبير اوي على الكلمات اللي فيه
عن النرفانا وتطهير النفس والبعد عن الدنيا بشهواتها و زينتها ، والحكمة والاتزان والتخلص من الآلام والمعاناة .. الخ مما هو معروف عن البوذية وتعاليم الدامابادا .. لكن لم اشعر بعمق او لم أشعر أي كلمة فيه -_- وان كان بعض الكلمات ممكن تنال اعجاب اي حد يعني !

كتاب تبدأه وتخلصه وبس :'D

Cassandra Kay Silva
Very good edition. The text is beautiful. The message is good. This is the kind of thing that can be read and reread throughout your lifetime and will bring different meanings at different places in your life. I got a copy at the library. I will be looking for a personal copy to keep for my own. So beautiful. I really appreciated the accompanying notes.
To read forever.
After some anonymous person on the internet tried to school me on what "karma" is, and ended up telling me "sorry for your ignorance, go read a book," I realized that I hadn't read The Dhammapada this year.

I purposefully sought out a different translation than the one I own a copy of, and found a translation by "various Oriental scholars" edited by F. Max Muller. I still prefer the Byrom translation, although there are things in this translation that really came through for me.

Favorite passages:
I really appreciate the accuracy of S. Radhakrishnan's translations. His translation of the Upanishads is excellent as is his translation of the Gita. This particular volume is an excellent rendition of the Dhammapada. As a philosopher, he wrote a lengthy introduction to the doctrines of Therevada Buddhism. He also deals with some of the problems related to the historical Buddha.

This volume also provides not just an accurate translation, but also the transliterated Pali text. It is helpful for
Po Po
Interesting little book. It seems that Benjamin Franklin 'borrowed' many of these sentiments for Poor Richard's Almanack. There is an emphasis on hard work and restraint in activities of the tongue: eating and speech.

This is organized by subject matter into tiny chapters of one to three pages long: " impurity" , "self" , "happiness" and "evil" are a few examples.

Here is one overtly sexist idea I strongly oppose: "bad conduct is the taint of woman". And then there are some extremely obvious words
D / wayward cloud
Sep 30, 2015 D / wayward cloud rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to D / wayward cloud by: Houellebecq
Shelves: kindle, non-fiction
El primer texto budista que leo en mi vida. Lo primero que me llamó la atención es su violencia, una especie de crueldad refinada que te explota en la cara (las itálicas son mías):

Eres como una hoja reseca y amarilla.
Los mensajeros de la Muerte ya se hallan
esperando por ti. Te hallas en el umbral de tu
partida. Pronto harás el viaje y no tienes
provisiones para el camino (c. XVIII, 1)
Contempla este cuerpo al que llamas
“bello”. Es un conjunto interminable de
dolores, de enfermedades; nada en él es
Nashwa Nasreldeen
مش حابة اقيمة بس هو يستحق القراءة
There is always room for compassion.
Nov 04, 2008 Warun rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: every buddhest
Recommended to Warun by: I had to read it for a class
this was a spiritually fulfilling helped me understand the life of the Buddha and the reasoning behind his actions and spiritual life decisions.Siddhartha is the son of a Brahmin's sun who ventures of because he wanted to live the life of samana who are wondering monks who live their life with our possessions and try to find eternal peace.he romeos the earth and ends up running into this man they called the Buddha ,which means enlightened one .he has lived for centuries and will finally ...more
"We are what we think.
All that we are arises with our thoughts.
With our thoughts we make the world."

I had not heard of the Dhammapada until my friend Legdup pulled out a worn copy from the inside of his wallet. "It's always with me," he said.

I fell in love with that particular translation, because others seem clunky. "All that we are is the result of what we have thought: it is founded on our thoughts, it is made up of our thoughts" just doesn't do it for me.

I sought out this translation, and wh
This is a book that requires some preparation before reading and concentration while reading to absorb its message, and is a work to revisit again and again. As Ram Dass writes in the foreword: "Read them slowly . . . a phrase at a time." Why? Because "These words come to you from purity; for them to touch you they must be received in purity. These words come out of divine simplicity; to liberate you they must be heard in simplicity. These words come from the soul; to feed that in you which thir ...more
Interesting to read from a Christian/Western perspective. As an amateur reading his first Buddhist text, this is fairly interesting. I've heard it said that Eastern thought is basically asking the same questions that pre-Socratic Greek thinkers were asking, but is lacking a Plato or a Christ to give answers to those questions. I didn't see anything in this text that disproved that claim, but this is also pretty short and only representative of one Eastern tradition.

These seem to be some of the
May 01, 2013 Roumissette rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Beginners and Advanced Spiritualists :)
Recommended to Roumissette by: a friend
Definitely a good read - the translation is really pure, and the message of the Buddha feels very powerful and inspiring, and still applicable to today's world. I really appreciate this book, and find a lot of inspiration from reading a chapter or even a certain passage.

The Dhammapada talks a lot about mastering the mind - but one thing against it, is that though it describes beautifully what is and what is not a truly concentrated mind, it does not tell me how to reach such a state, nor does it
Rachel Cotterill
This is one of the world's most influential philosophical texts, and lies at the heart of Buddhism, so it's not surprising that it was an interesting read with plenty to think about. The translation is quite old (hence being freely available online) and it isn't always perfectly clear. There are some ambiguities of language, for example in several places reaching Nirvana is defined as being above good and evil (amongst other things), and yet requiring the avoidance of evil (and sin) to achieve i ...more
Exactly as one might expect (though more hell-talk than I had anticipated). It expounds virtuous ideals about how to live. Not all of it is particularly logical in its deductions and contradiction abounds, but then that tends to be the nature of religion. It is often down to interpretation I suppose.
Many of the similes are dubious but, at the very least, they are perhaps culturally informative.

2.5 stars
Good clear poetic translation. Buddhism has always been interesting to me , as sometimes it approaches the level of philosophy so much as a religion - at least it does to my understanding. Good thoughts for living well.
Jul 07, 2008 Meen rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Those seeking a good first experience with Buddhist scripture.
I chose this version of The Dhammapada b/c of the excellent reviews Glenn Wallis' translation and exegesis received. I was not disappointed. This is an excellent introduction to Buddhist scripture!
Thomas Ross
If I hadn't been high, this book would've got 1 star I think.
Not a work of Japanese literature, I know, but in its Chinese translation (from the original Pali), Hokkugyō 法句経 is--or perhaps was once--a popular text in Japan, thought to represent sayings of the Buddha himself. This Little Black Classics edition is excerpted from Juan Mascaró's translation of The Dhammapada, first published in 1973, though I'm not familiar with this earlier version.

Much of the advice is (surely!) common to all religions:
"Speak the truth, yield not to anger, give what you ca
This translation of the Dhammapada is wonderfully lyrical and easy to read. I've found that sometimes reading English language Buddhist books can become a little routine- many are long on exegesis and short on poetry or memorable stories. A nice antidote is to switch up your reading by finding direct translations of important Buddhist sources. The problem, of course, is that the quality of translations varies widely, and a bad translation with no explanation can be difficult to read. That isn't ...more
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Gautama Buddha (Sanskrit: गौतम बुदध) born as Prince Siddhārtha (Sanskrit: सिदधारथ) was a spiritual teacher from the Indian subcontinent, on whose teachings Buddhism was founded.

Gautama is the primary figure in Buddhism, and accounts of his life, discourses, and monastic rules are believed by Buddhists to have been summarized after his death and memorized by his followers. Various collections of te
More about Gautama Buddha...

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“A man is not called wise because he talks and talks again; but if he is peaceful, loving and fearless then he is in truth called wise.” 540 likes
“Conquer the angry one by not getting angry; conquer the wicked by goodness; conquer the stingy by generosity, and the liar by speaking the truth.

[Verse 223]”
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